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QUAE FiANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1912 



Holloman, 4 

Morse, 2b 3 

Gaddis, lb 3 

Cassibry, e 3 

Ward, p-cf. 2 

•Jon. s. If 2 

Hawthorne, rf... 3 
Condrey, p-cf... 2 



OPENING EXERCISES 



Prospects Bright for Athletic*-. 

Athletics are now under g » *d 
headway. There is not going io 
be as much interest taken in fec?,- 
ball this year as there was 
although there will be several 
ter-class games. A schedule A»dl 
be made so that each class tei m 
will get to play each of the oth r 
teams at least once. Baseba'^ 
and basket ball and track evei * 
are the onW things in which v ‘ 
are allo^prto compete with othd’ 
colleges, and therefore they nee- 
special attention. 

Friday afternoon there was 
lively game of baseball played 



Many Speeches Mark Opening of New Session, 



On Wednesday, Sept. 18, Millsaps College started out on its 
twenty-first session. The opening exercises began at 11 o’clock with 
students and many visitors present. After a song by the student 
body, Rev. C. H. Ellis, pastor of the Methodist Church at Terry, 
Miss., was called upon for the opening prayer. 

After the prayer by Bro. Ellis, Rev. J. R. Jones, presiding elder 
of the Jackson district, read a passage of scripture and made a short 
talk in which he exhorted the boys to get wisdom and understanding. 
Rev. Jones is well-known on the Millsaps campus and is quite popu- 
lar among the boys. 

Dr. Watkins then made his first appearance before the student 
body and the puhlic as president of Millsaps College. He made a 
short and interesting address in which he welcomed the boys to 
Jtillsaps. He promised to outline his plan of action later as occasion 
required. Dr. Watkins also spoke in appreciative terms of the cor- 
atal relation that exists between Millsaps College and the city of 
Jackson. TT % himself, is very popular in Jackson and it is hoped 
that his presence at the head of the college will serve as the medium 
start next spring. which will uraw the city and the college into still closer relationship. 

The game was exciting from' o r "Watkins has made a decided hit with the student body. He has 
start to finish and although it manifested a deep interest in every phase of college life and has 
ended in a tie. the result might 1 ^hown that he has a deep interest in the welfare of every student in 
have been different had the game college 

lasted nine, innings. The scrubs After the close of Dr. Watkins' address. Dr. J. M. Sullivan, 
got into the game from the start. , onior member of t lie faculty and vice-president of the college, made 
and when the smoke of the first strong address in which he spoke of the growing popularity of the 
inning had cleared away they „i] psre . He said this is Dartieularlv noticeable in the northern nart 



24 6 5 18 3 5 
NEW BOYS.” 

AB. R. H. PO. A. E 
3 1 1 10 0 0 



Taylor, c 

Rucker, lb 

Fant. 2b 

Backstrum, ss 
MeLure, 3b _.... 

Brown, p 

Barrett, rf 

Frazier, cf 

Hendrix, If 

Russel, ss 

Moore, 3b 

Kirkpat., c-ef. 



The varsity baseball men who 
are back this year are: Galloway, 
Morse, Gaddis, Cassibry, Ward, 
Jones, Hathorn, Condrey, and 
Jackson. 

These men will have a hard 
fight to hold their regular places, 
because there are some new boys 
here who come to us with mighty 
good reputations. 

Taylor, who is large enough to 
catch anj - pitcher, looks very 
good. Brown, who can put most 
anything on a ball, will probably 
turn out to be a valuable man. 

Rucker, Fant, Russel, Back- 
strum, MeLure, and Moore, /who 
played on the infield, all have 
good arms and handle themselves 
like old leaguers. 

Barrett, Frazier, Hendrix, and 
Kirkpatrick, who played the 
outfield, seemed to be experienced 
men and the men^who get the 
places over them, if they do, are 
going to have a hard fight. There 
are probably other boys on the 
campus who are good ball play- 
ers, but who have not yet li r d a 
chance to play. 



2 



€bt purple ai D ttlbite 






COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary- 

Dr. A. A. Kern... Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan.. Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

W. O. Brumfield Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern. Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton —Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds — Secretary- 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage -President 

F. T. Scott. .Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

H. H. Boswell President i 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell —Baseball Manager 

N. F. West Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 



COLLEGE NIGHT A GREAT 
SUCCESS. 

Friday night. Sept. 20, was the 
' occasion of “College Night.” For 
the past three years this has been 
one of the most enjoyable and ben- 
eficial occasions of the session. It 
was begun three years ago under 
the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. It 
was under the direction of and 
through the interest of Dr. Kern 
that it was started here, and it 
has been through his unflagging 
interest that it has always been 
made a great success. 

The program, usually, for this 
occasion is short speeches by 
leading students, music, college 
yells, and songs. Frank T. Scott, j 
one of the leading seniors in 
school, as master of ceremonies, in- 
troduced the speakers in a pleas- 
ing style, and strong speeches 
were presented representing dif- 
ferent phases of college life. 

The first speaker was H. H. Bos- 
well, who spoke on the question of 
“Athletics.” Boswell is an excel- 
lent speaker, having won the Mis- 
sissippi Chautauqua medal last 
summer at Crystal Springs. He 
has been a close follower of ath- 
letics at Mil Isa ps, being baseball 
manager and president of the Ath- 
letic Association last year. He 
made a strong plea for the dif- 
ferent games at the college and 



College Directory 



urged each man to try for a place pin,- s of college life. ! Bos o ? ll then delivered his speech 

on one of the teams. B. i . Foster gave an interesting on ‘The Call of Miss.,” with 

J. T. Weems came as next speak- talk or the work of the Preachers’ whicj he won the Crystal Springs 
er on the subject of the “Honor League, told of what they had Chautauqua medal last summer. 
Council.” He explained the work- done and hoped to do. and his speech was greatly en- 

ings of this organization. In a President Watkins gave an in- ; joyed by all present, 
masterly style he showed the good teresting discussion of all phases . R p] Selbv welcomed the new 

influence of this body on the life of college life which was much members to the society and ex- 

of the school and the sense of hon- enjoyed. plained the purpose of the society, 

or of the student body. He closed After this refreshments were Then the society went into an 

with an impressive appeal to served in the Y. M. C. A. Hall, informal session of voluntary re- 




nierks, during which many excel- 
t addresses w r ere made by Tom 
I’-'iley of the law department, 
Sfioltt, Jolly, Weems and others of 
old members. A large uum- 
^ of new men were initiated as 
ji'K mbers of the society. C. II. 
Bljwett and James McClure, Jr., 
w*re elected as monthly orators. 



RESOLUTIONS 



The recent death of Omar Reynolds, a former Millsaps 
student, brings sadness to the entire student body. As 
this sadness is most deeply felt among his classmates, be it 

Resolved, By the Senior Class of Millsaps College: 

1. That we express our sympathy to the bereaved family 
in the loss of their son and brother, our class-mate. 

2. That we shall ever remember his true, noble life as 
lived among us and the faithful work which he did in the Y. 
M. C. A., the literary society and college work in general. 

3. That we know that we have lost one of the strongest 
members of our class. 

4. That God may console those who are bereaved. 

5. That a copy of these resolutions be printed in the 
Purple and White and that a copy be sent to his people. 

Permit us to say further that notwithstanding the fact 
that we are much grieved over his loss yet we submit to the 
will of God, and trust that those even nearer to him may have 
the same spirit. 



WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 



( f. Millsaps College emblem 



uttons, fobs, medals, etc 



We bless thee sweet will of God 
And all thy ways adore, 

And every day we live 

We seem to love thee more and more 



Ve do all kinds of Watch 



tnd Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 



111 that he blesses is our good 
And unblessed good is ill, 

All is right that seems most wrong 
If it be his own sweet will. 

J. D. WROTEN. 

F. T. SCOTT, 

J. T. WEEMS, 

Committee. 

The sad news of Reynolds’ death was a shock to us all 
and the Purple and White joins the student body in extending 
its sympathy to his friends and relatives. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 



Second door east of Ken 
nington’s big store 
Jackson, Miss. 



every man to take defeat rather 
than dishonor. 

S. G. Noble spoke for the Prep- 
aratory School. No mishap oc- 
curred to mar the pleasure of his 
speech this year, and in his 
usual- humorous style he gave an 
impressive address. 

J. D. Wroten spoke of the work 
of the Y. M. C. A., and showed 
that it covered and supported all 



where an enjoyable time w<! 
spent. 



SAY BOYS! 



LAMAR SOCIETY 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the Jackson 
Steam Laundry 
and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. j. SPINKS 



Boswell Orates. 

The first meeting of the Lamt 
Literary Society was called tc r- 
der Friday night by Presi it 
Kirkland, and then led in pr »r 
by the chaplain, Olin Ray. I I. 






Che purple anD CGtjitc 



3 



Y. M. C. A. 

Cs Foster 'Addresses Association on 
“The First Inning.” 

jO On Friday night, September 27, 
V) the Y. M. C. A. met for the first 
jj ' time this session. The president, 
D. J. Savage, conducted the 
JK opening song and prayer service 
jr^ and closed by introducing the 
1 speaker of the occasion. B. F. Fos- 
nk ;er. This gentleman is well known 
and highly respected in college 
^ circles, especially those of the Y. 
V M. C. A., of which he is and has 
k been a faithful member and effi- 
iStcient officer. 

i f. Foster began by reading a part 
v of the first chapter of the Epistle 
"y to the Ephesians. He spoke of the 
JS. importance of the first part of a 
man’s college course. It is a gen- 
eral truth but one especially appli- 
cable to college life that a good 
beginning must necessarily have a 
great influence on the entire 
course. There is nothing un- 
natural in this. The man who be- 
gins his course in college without 
due regard to his duties does two 
things: he forms habits of idleness 
which will be hard to overcome in 
future years and also fails to lay 
a foundation in school work that 
will make- the work of the future 
easier. 

The speaker called attention to 
the fact that in college life a man 
was absolutely free. The student 
is free to a great extent to choose 
his course in school. Certainly he 
is free to say whether or not that 
course shall be one of profit to him 
or just merely a record of wasted 
opportunities. He who refuses to 
battle with the harder things, no 
| matter in what sphere of life they 
may be found, can never hope to 
develop that strength which the 
successful man must have. An- 
other choice is that .of companions. 
This is not so important a ques- 
tion at Millsaps as elsewhere for, 
as the speaker said, our school has 
more gentlemen in respect to her 
size than any other school of prom- 



The duty of every schoolboy, so j 
Foster said, was more than to him- j 
self and the college while he is 
here. One of his greatest duties 
is to the people of his home and 
home conlmunity. Unless we can j 
go back and make our influence 
felt among those whose sacrifices j 
have been for us, then our educa- j 
tion profits us but little. 

The speaker closed by appeal- 



ing to every loyal Millsaps man to 
put on the whole armor of Christ- 
ianity and fight the battle of faith ! 
and duty in the future as we have 
not done in the past. 

After the conclusion of this ad- 
dress. the house was thrown open 
for the election of certain officers 
in place of those who did not re- 
turn. Mr. B. E. Selby was chosen 
as secretary and Mr. W. S. Burns 
as treasurer. President Watkins 
made at this point the announce- 
ment of the untimely death of Mr. 
Reynolds, a former officer of the 
Association, after which he dis- 
missed the meeting. 



Boys, have your Tailoring done 
by T. B. Doxey, 228 AY. Capitol 
St., and save the special discount 
which he gives to College boys. 

3t 

Edward H. Green in a Dramatic 
Role. 

In every crisis a man rises, 
fitted as it were by nature, for the 
particular work in question. Sel- 
dom has this axiom of experience 
been more completely verified 
than by a recent court -room 
scene. From a modest, retiring 
young gentleman to a master of 
dramatic art is a long way. so 
far in fact that it is spanned only 
in a lifetime and then, only by 
Destiny — groomed spirits. Yet a 
young law-student of Millsaps 
College recently metamorphosed 
from the former state to the lat- 
ter within the twinkling of an eye. 
Little wonder, then, that Wednes- 
day's papers heralded the follow- 
ing story to the world: "E. H. 

Green, a young law student, 
donned the clothes of the de- 
ceased and thus enabled the court 
to see and understand the nature 
of the wounds by which the de- 
ceased met his death.” 

Air. Green’s grace and manly 
figure thus became a very im- 
portant factor in the determina- 
tion of the issue before the court. 
Standing there as calm and unper- 
turbed as Moses at reveille, he 
seemed wholly unconscious of the 
dramatic role he played! His 
manner was almost, if not quite, 
sufficient to make his first official 
appearance in court as tragic as 
the annual rendition in the fresh- 
man ’ contest of the death-bed 
scene of Benedict Arnold. May 
we see more of this young artist ! 



DIRECTORY 



DR F H r.UTDWAY v - OTIS Robertson, Jackson, Miss. 

1 ' = r '- 1 1 • Vl.VJ.l.VJ > > 1 \ I THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. „ . , _ _ , 

Robertson & Robertson 

Second Floor Kress Building Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 

Phone 316 Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214' 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



DR. G. M. GALLOWAY GREEN TREE HOTEL 

DENTIST RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 

Office over Kress. Room 1. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

Cumb. Phone 2013. T. O. BYRD, Prop. 



Office over Kress. 



Cumb. Phone 2013. 



E. A. MAY, I). D. S. 



408-411 Century Building 



JACKSON, MISS. 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 

BOYS, DRINK 

Robinson Springs Water 

If You Don’t Know Why, Ask B. M. 
or Phone 1280. 

Robinson Springs (Inc.) 

Century Building. 

OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
512 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



BOYS 

Make SISTRUNK’S your 
Headquarters for Fruits and Cold 
Drinks. 



Cumberland 870. 



Home 2139. 



RAH. RAH. RAH. 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



LOGA^ PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

ADVERTISE 

in 

Che 19urplc aith CClijite 

and 

GET RESULTS 

RAH. RAH, RAH. 
HAH, HAH, HAH. 



Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the ”M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 

Call and see our Fountain Pens, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 

Someone wanted to know why Anyone happening to enter the 
Prof. Noble was late for breakfast. Prep school during chapel, will 
Probably the football practice of please notice the four front seats 
the evening before had something on the left hand side — we are 
to do with it. proud of them. 



4 



€be Purple anD COfjftc 



€be Purple anD CObit e 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry. Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore.--.:.... Special Reporter 

S. L. Croc kett: ^: Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. Gates Asst. Business Manager 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 



Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



Books, like distilled spirits, 
grow better with age. — (Chis- 
holm.) 



Millsaps has many sons of 
whom she is justly proud. One 
of these is Judge James A. Teat, 
B. A., B. L., ’00. who on the 21st 
of September assumed the duties 
of circuit judge of the 5th ju- 
dfeial district. The Purple and 
White extends its warmest con- 
gratulations to Judge Teat. 



Genuine heartfelt regret was 
expressed by all the students on 
opening day when it was learned 
that our friend and benefactor. 
Major Millsaps, would not be 
with us at the opening exercises. 
We are glad to learn that he has 
recently returned to the city after 
a very pleasant absence in which 
he has enjoyed excellent health 
and we hope to see him on the 
campus at an early date. 



The students of Millsaps Col- 
lege were very much grieved to 
bear of the death of Rev. W. B. 
Hull, the father of our former 
president. No man ever labored 
more conscientiously or more suc- 
cessfully for any cause than did 
Dr. Hull for Millsaps during his 
presidency, and we wish to assure 
him that although he is not with 
us now, that he has in this his 
hour of sorrow our heartfelt sym- 
pathy, as he has at all times our 
esteem and best wishes. 



OUR PRESIDENT. 

The students of Millsaps Col- 
lege have just cause for rejoicing 
over the election of Dr. Watkins 
as our president. To us he comes 
by no means as a stranger, but 
as one whom we have long known 
and loved. He has been identified 
with and a part of the college 
from the time when the idea of 
Millsaps College was first con- 
ceived. From his position as a 
member of the joint commission 
that was elected to formulate 
plans for the establishment of the 
school he became upon the or- 
ganization of the board of trus- 
tees one of the leading spirits of 
that body. To this there is added 
the fact that for the last twelve 
years he has served in the ca- 
pacity of vice-president of the 
board and in the absence of 
both Presidents Galloway and 
Murrah. respectively, he has fre- 
quently presided over the meet- 
ings and deliberations of that 
body. 

It is useless to say that his 
visits to the college have been so 
frequent and his relations so inti- 
mate that he has not only made 
himself fully conversant with 
every department of our school 
but, as few other men have ever 
done, has become the friend of 
every student of Millsaps College, 
both past and present. 

Dr. Watkins has long been rec- 
ognized as one of the foremost 
ministers of the land and has most 
ably filled the best appointments 
in his section. Not only has he 
been a minister of wide note but 
he has, with eminent distinction, 
filled important posts in almost 
every department of the church 
service. His election over the 
number of brilliant applicants 
who sought the presidential chair 
is itself a fitting testimonial of his 
merit and worth. This recogni- 
tion of ability and distinguished 
qualities of leadership by the 
hoard of trustees has been amply 
justified by the most commend- 
able manner in which he has as- 
sumed control of and managed 
the affairs of the college through 
one of the most promising and 
flattering openings and organiza- 
tions in the school’s history. We 
have no hesitancy in saying that 
if any one were inclined to ask 
whether or not he has already 
justified the ample expectations 
of those who rated him highest, 



that the student body would join 
the' Purple and White with hearty 
accord in answering with a re- 
verberant Yes. 

He has completely won the 
hearts of the student body, who 
look upon him as a man — in all 
that the word implies. One whom 
we can love, honor and obey — one 
whom we fear not to approach as 
our friend. To us. he is a man 
of brilliant intellect, of large and 
fluent vocabulary, an orator of no 
mean ability, a worker of invinci- 
ble zeal and energy, a man of so 
great versatility that he is equally 
at home whether in the pulpit, in 
the class room, on the athletic 
field or in the home of a student, 
withal a clean, upright Christian 
gentleman endowed with catholic 
zeal for the education and up- 
building of humanity and with 
dominant tact and regnant com- 
mon sense in all things that as- 
sures success. 

It is apparent to every one that 
he has back of him not only the 
entire student body but the en- 
thusiastic support and good-will 
of every member of the faculty, 
and we most heartily pledge him 
the loyal support of the Purple 
and White, assuring him that we 
are with him in every movement 
that tends toward the betterment 
and advancement of our already | 
great institution. 

Some one has said that the | 
achievements of a man’s past I 
when he approaches the meridian! 
become the promise of his later 
attainments. We can but cherish 
the hope that the future progress 
of our president will not be in 
some promotion to some other 
place, but in the enlarged oppor- 



tunities and unending growth of 
Millsaps College. 

m 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 



The enrollment in the law class 
of both this and last year clearly 
demonstrates that this depart- 
ment is no longer a thing to be 
pitied. This year’s enrollment 
will surpass that of any previous 
session. Already twenty-two stu- 
dents have signified a desire to 
expose themselves to clients by 
joining the class, and it is ex- 
pected that recruits sufficient to 
bring the number to thirty-five 
will soon be in the ranks. 

At a recent meeting of the class, 
the following officers were duly 
elected: President, Thos. L, Bai- 
ley; Vice-President, Jas. A. 
Blount; Secretary. Dabney; Treas- 
urer. Fulton Thompson. All offi- 
cers were duly installed, except 
Treasurer Thompson, whose bond 
will be made by one of America’s 
leading bonding companies. 

The (Moot court will be organ- 
ized at an early date. Several 
matters of very great importance 
are now pending. Mr. Carter has 
employed counsel and will push 
his suit against the owner of cer- 
tain vicious dogs that are wont to 
exercise him rather vigorously 
from time to time. Along with 
other facts. Carter will aver that 
on more than one occasion he has 
been compelled to run off from 
his hat. 



Prof. Savage is not keeping 
study hall for us this year. It 
seems to take all of his energy try- 
ing to teach some of the Preps 
Caesar. 



YOUR ORDER 

For that Fall and Winter Suit really belongs to us 
if you are particular at all about what you get for 
your money. We believe our store should be your 
store, when thinking of ordering a Suit or Overcoat. 
The only inducements we can offer you are de- 
pendable fabrics, honest values, stylish and durable 
tailoring. 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW 

MADE ’g GUARANTEED 

to your S I rv TO 

MEASURE A * * FIT 



STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 






€bc Purple anD Cflfritg 



o 



MASS MEETING. THE GALLOWAY “OF AGE.” 



Enthusiastic Athletic Rally. 

The first mass meeting of the 
session was held in the college 
chapel on Monday night. Sept. 
23. Practically every student in 
the college was present to hear of 
the prospects for athletics and 
great enthusiasm was manifested, j 
a fact which portends a great in- 
terest in ever}' phase of athletics i 
during the session. 

Prof. E. Y. Burton, the leading 

spirit in athletics at Millsaps, 

stated that the purpose of the 

meeting was purely a business 

one. He said that the Athletic 

Association must have money if 

* 

it did anything toward getting out 
successful teams. He showed how 
that at other institutions the stu- 
dents are forced to contribute to 
athletics when they matriculate, 
while at Millsaps all contributions 
are purely voluntary. He urged 
the students to rally to the sup- 
port of athletics by paying two 
dollars and becoming members of 
the Athletic Association. 

After Prof. Burton’s talk, 
Messrs. Thomas L. Bailey and Jim 
Blount, alumni of the college and 
at present members of the Mill- 
saps law class, made short talks. 
Both of these highly respected and 
learned gentlemen expressed the 
opinion that good teams are the 
only things which can so bring 
Millsaps to the front that she will 
be recognized as the leading in- 1 
stitution of the State. Both be- 
lieve that Millsaps is the greatest 
institution of its kind in the 
South and the only thing re- 
quired to make it be recognized i 
as such is something to bring it i 
prominently before the eyes of the 
public. 



The Galloway Literary Society 
of Millsaps College was called to 
order at 8 :45 p. m. Friday even- 
ing by President Harmon for its 
first meeting of this scholastic 
year. President Harmon deliv- 
ered the opening address and the 
house was lead in prayer by Ben 
Foster. Excellent addresses were 
delivered by Dr. Sullivan of the 
faculty. Secretary Broomfield and 
Mr. Blount of the law department. 
Crockett delivered an excellent 
oration, which was followed by an 
address by J. D. Wroten in which 
were set forth the principles for 
which the grand old society 
stands. 

This was indeed a memorable 
meeting of the society, for seven- 
teen new members vowed allegi- 
ance to her constitution at this 
session. A spirit of enthusiasm 
pervades the society and it is with 
bright prospects and noble as- 
pirations that we enter into the 
work of this year, with every mem- 
ber doing his duty, and we expect 
to make this year the grandest in 
the history of the society. Twen- 
ty-one years ago the Galloway be- 
gan her career, and it is with 
great pride that we note the work 
which she has done during her 
past history. Six times her men 
have captured the medal at the M. 
I. 0. A. Therefore it is with no 
little degree of pride that we en- 
ter upon the duties of this year 
having as our ideal to gain first 
place in the contests this year. 

This society meets every Friday 
evening at 8 o’clock. Visitors are 
given a hearty welcome. 

S. H. FRAZIER. 

R. E. P. 




LINOTYPE MACHINE PLANT 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing the latest 
model Linotypes kept continually busy on contract publications. 




You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 




BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

*415 East Capitol St. 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you lo treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 







6 



Ci)e purple anD SOftite 



J 

. 



LOCAL NEWS 



Alas! where are the many “old 
faces we used to shake hands 
with?” 



Well, hoys, we have had a 
long vacation; now let us settle 
down and do a good year’s work. 



Supt. Bailey of the Jackson 
schools, has kept his promise and 
sent us a good man in Leon Hen- J 
dricks. We are glad to welcome 
Hendricks among us. 



“Shorty” Adams (in conversa- 
tion with Willingham): “I am 

disgusted with the whole thing.” 
Willingham: “You must have 

gotten a good look at yourself.” I 



F. J. Bussell, who has beenj S. R. Boykin, of last year’s 
with us for a number of years, is sophomore class, passed through 
now studying engineering at the the city last week en route to the 
A. and M. University of Mississippi, where 

he intends to take up the study of 

Of all sweet words of tongue or medicine. 

pen, j 

The sweetest of these, “Enclosed are indeed glad to have 

find ten ($10.00).” Patterson back with us this year. 

It will be remembered that he was 

Messrs. Pittman and Ramsey, compelled to leave school the lat- 
alumni of Millsaps. were on the i er part of last session on account 
campus visiting friends and frat °f illness. 

mates last week. _ j 

I Mr. Blount (in opening address 

The Jackson High School sends to the Galloway Society) : “When 
us up a bevy of pretty girls from I was here in school we played 
last year’s graduating class. We tricks on the Professor.” 
extend to them a hearty welcome. Dr. Sullivan •(in audience).: 

“Yes, you are the very rascal that 

Prof. Noble has proven himself 8°t m Y buggy.” 

an excellent herdsman by round- 

ing up a goodly number of T. L. Bailey (Bill) of the class 
“Preps” during the summer, °i 09 is back with us taking law 

this year. We always welcome 

Among the “come backs” Mill- baek sueh men as Bill, for men 
saps is glad to tvelcome Melvin like him are the ones that are 
Johnson, “Jerry” Montgomery making records for their alma 
and the indomitable “Bob” Ster- mater, 
ling. 

SOCIAL. 



Football ! Football ! ! That ’s 
the cry. Let every class get 
busy and put out a winning team 
and we will have a series of in- 
teresting games. 



News comes to us from Gulf- 
port of the tragic death of Omar 
Reynolds, a member of last year’s 
Junior Class. The student body 
extends sympathy to the bereaved 
family. 



College Night was a grand suc- 
cess. We feel sure the speeches 
were enjoyed by all, especially 
the one delivered by Prof. Noble 
entitled “Mary’s Little Lamb.” 



Bill Ferguson, of last year’s 
Freshman Class, is now in the real 
estate business with his father in 
Hattiesburg. He sends us words 
of encouragement. 



Kappa Alpha Smoker. 

The Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
entertained their friends at a 
delightful smoker on Saturday 
night, Sept. 28, 1912, in their 
beautiful and attractive chapter 
house. To those who have enjoyed 
the hospitality of this fraternity j 
these social functions are a source 
of much pleasure and it needs 
only the announcement that the j 
K. As. are to entertain to assure 
a delightful evening. This atfair, 
coming as it does before the rem- 
iniscences of vacation days have 
been chased away by hard study, j 
cheers up the old men and often i 
proves the foundation of manyi 
new valued friendships. 

Fruit and punch were served 
and the evening passed so quick- 
ly that neither guests or hosts j 
could realize that their jolly j 
smoker was over. 



A Well Dressed Young Man 

Kuppenheimer Suits, Stacy Adams Shoes, Stetson 
Hats, Montauk Shirts, Arrow Collars and 
Coopers Underwear. 

Such brands as these are the best that money can buy and a large 
assortment can always be found to select from. Prices are very 
reasonable — satisfaction is always guarnteed. 

. LET US FIT YOU OUT 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720. 



Drink Carbonated 



Rensselaer 

Polytechnic 

and Science Institute 

Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.>, Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. E.). Electrical Engineering (E. E.), and 
General Science 'B. S.). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical, Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



Coca=Cola 

IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Jackson, Miss. 



College Boys! 

Trade with and meet your friends at our store. We want you 
to feel at home in our place of business. 

We want your drug business. Remember! “The Old Reliable 
Drug Store” is The Best in the city. Prescription work our specialty, 
all prescriptions being filled, by a graduate and registered druggist. 
We send for and deliver your prescriptions to the campus. 

The most complete stock in Jackson of STATIONERY, CANDIES, 
CJGARS, best, good and better. FOUNTAIN PENS, the perfect ones. 
BRUSHES of all kinds, TOILET ARTICLES, RUBBER GOODS; in 
fact, everything to be found in an up-to-date Drug Store. 

Remember the place. All cars lead to our door. 

We deliver quick. Try us. Phones 109 and 1499. 

Hunter & McGee 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Your SMOKERS and RECEPTIONS will not be complete unless 
you will let 

MANGUM 

serve you. He knows how and will do it reasonably. He also carries 
the best line of 

FANCY CANDY 

to be found in the City of Jackson. The best that’s made. When 
down town don’t forget to drink at his Soda Fountain where only the 
best of everything is served College Men. 

Headquarters for Millsaps Collegians. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




€bc Purple anD CTite 



7 






GREETINGS. 



For the fourth time the Purple 
and White extends its heartiest 
greetings to the students and 
friends of Millsaps College. We 
rejoice with the old students in 
the associations of the past and 
in the "joys of again assembling 
beneath the protecting wings of 
bur beloved alma mater. We re- 
joice to welcome the new men to 
our fold, for our hopes for the 
future lie in the addition of fresh 
young blood. For the old men we 
wish another year of growth, 
progress and development. For 
the new, we have all good wishes 
for the speedy development of 
that broad, liberal and generous 
college spirit and pride that be- 
speaks acquaintance with all 
phases of college life. To both 
alike we extend our heartfelt 
wishes for a most pleasant and j 
profitable year. 

Cognizant of the exalted posi- 
tion which our paper has assumed 
among the college publications 
through its former editors we, the 
new staff, beseech a helping hand 
and cordial support from every 
member of the college. With your 
help we hope to make our paper 
an unbiased history of our college 
year, free from all factionalism. 
We hope to make it truly repre- 
sentative of all that is highest and 
best in Millsaps College, portray- 
ing those things which are so 
manifest in ranking Millsaps Col- 
lege among the first colleges of 1 
the land. 



Pi Kappa Alpha Smoker. 

The house of the Pi Kappa Al- 
phas, always an attractive place, 
was unusually so Saturday night 
when the boys of this fraternity 
entertained their friends at an 
enjoyable smoker. This being an 
annual affair, it is always looked 
forward to by the young mqn 
with much pleasure, and this en- 
tertainment of 1912 proved es- 
pecially delightful. Many jokes 
and tales of vacation escapades 
were related, while they smoked 
and enjoyed the fruit and punch 
served by their hosts. Hours 
spent in such a delightful man- 
ner of course passed quickly, and 
it was with regret that this jolly 
partj T broke up, each guest carry- 
ing away with him pleasant mem- 
ories of a most enjoyable evening. 



Announcement. 

Beginning with next number 
we will begin the “Origin of Spe- 
cies.” It will be a sort of early 
history of the life and experi- 
ences of different members of the 
law class. 



The population of the Prep 
school has increased about twenty- 
five per cent this year. Also the 
enrollment of the Hyenas. 



Millsaps College has established 
a new record for thoroughness in 
work since they have added to its 
faculty “Kid” Cain, “Biz” Clark 
and “Sherloco,” alias Aluminum 
Moore. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43,332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right fexercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY - THE PLACE -OF COURSE 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1,00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



GALLE TAILORING CO. 

417*4 E. Capitol St. 

We do all kinds of Altering, Repairing, Cleaning 
and Pressing at Reasonable Prices. 

• Old Phone 618 



ATTEND THE BEST 

HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 

JACKSON, MISS. 

The Only Business University in the South 

y 

We have no branch schools and devote our 
ENTIRE time to ONE INSTITUTION which 
POSITIVELY enables us to give our students 
the CREAM of Business Training. 



We are as good as the best, 

And are better than all the rest. 



8 



Or purple anD SHtrite 



Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



To Millsaps College Men : 

The Official Watch Fob for your 
college is now ready. Come to the 
Quality Shop and ask about them. 
How to get one, etc. Our line of 

Men’s Wear 

in all lines is the largest and best in 
Jackson. 

Special Prices to You 

Come in and talk to us. 

FEIBELMAN BROS. 

411 E. Capitol Street. 




The popular “Belmont** notch Collar 
made In self striped Madras. 2 for 25c 

AR.HOW 

COLLARS 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Makers 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



Prep Athletic Association Elects 
Officers. 

The Prep School Athletic Asso- 
ciation held its first meeting of the 
year on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 1912. 
The purpose of this meeting being 
to elect new officers of the class 
and the various teams. The fol- 
lowing were elected: 

Joe Spinks, president. 

A. B. Holder, vice president. 

Prof. S. G. Noble, See-Treas. 

L. H. Gates, manager football 

team. 

E. P. Whitson, manager track 
team. 

W. M. Willingham, manager 
basket ball team. 

The meeting was presided over 
by L. H. Gates, our president of 
last year. Several points of inter- 
est were discussed, and the com- 
mittee for the collecting of the 
dues appointed. 

About twenty-four new men 
were taken in at this meeting. 

Prentiss Men Busy. 

The Prentiss Literary Society 
met Saturday, Sept. 28, 1912. The 
house was called to order by Vice 
President L. H. Gates. After a 
prayer, offered by Prof. R. S. 
Ricketts, R. C. Edwards gave the 
history of the Society in a thor- 
ough and interesting manner. He 
was followed by Prof. G. W. Hud- 
dleston, who made a helpful talk 
touching on parliamentary law. 
Prof. Ricketts also made a speech 
before the society. 

A business meeting was then 
called and a large number of new 
men were initiated into the society. 

The following officers were elect- 
ed for the first term of session 
1912-13. 

N. Golding, president. 

C. W. Alford, vice president. 

S. B. Bufkin, secretary. 

L. H. Gates, treasurer. 

Joe Spinks, critic. 

B. P. Gates, censor. 

E. S. Brooks, doorkeeper. 

Subscription Price 

$ 1.50 

Per Year 



$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 

Edwin Clapp PRICE Manhattan Sh rts 



$15 to $25.00 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

* Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A/ and B. S. 

A well equipped Law r School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, D. D., L. L. D. 






(Tltr purple mb 




lutr 



QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Vol. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1912. 



No. 2. 



DR. D. C. HULL. 



A Review of His Administration. | 

Millsaps students, and especial- 
ly the old ones, will be glad to 
learn that Dr. D. C. Hull, our 
president for the last two years 
and who resigned last year to take 
charge of the public schools of 
Meridian, is delighted with his 
work there. He has gone into the 
work with the vim and determina- 
tion that is so characteristic of the 
man and the people of Meridian 
are better satisfied than they have 
been since ten years ago when Dr. 
Hull left them. 

It would perhaps not he amiss 



ds> 



ATHLETICS 






There were other changes and 
improvements of a less public na- 
ture, but none the less of greal 
benefit to the college. 

The students of Millsaps College 

T , I wish for Dr. Hull much success 

Football in the Air— Class Teams Fast Rounding Into and they will watch his future 



Shape — Foot Ball! Foot Ball! 



career with solicitous interest. 






PROF. LIN. 



A Valuable Addition to the 
Faculty. 

As the session progresses 



the 



Football is the cry that is coming from every corner of the campus 
It has been decided to lay base ball aside for the present and enter) 
into foot ball with all our heart, soul and strength. 

All the teams have been organized and with about a week ’s prac- j 
tice will be ready to play. All this week the teams have been making ! student body and the faculty real- 
good progress towards getting team work and there are some now who ize more and more that there was 
work like a machine. no mistake made in the election of 

The Freshmen have gotten out a good team and look somewhat Prof. J. Reese Lin to the chair of 
like winners. i History and Economics. Prof. 



in this connection to enumerate 

some of the important achieve- The Sophomores have a team that is going to make a hard fight Lin is a native of Georgia and a 
ments of Dr. Hull during the short for the cup. graduate of Emory College of that 

time that he was with us. In the The Junior-Senior team is composed of old heads and even state. • He has studied extensively 
first place through his personal though they do have perfect team work, they are by no means going | at Vanderbilt University and at 

popularity throughout the state to walk away with the cup. Cornell. He has had wide ex- 

and his energy in the work of It is generally conceded that the Preps have a winning team. It perience as an instructor. * Eight 

building up the college, he increas- j is true that they have the heaviest team, hut when you attempt to years of his life have been devoted 

ed the attendance 11 per cent in ! match weight against brains it will soon be found that there is a great to educational work in Mississippi, 
his first year and in his second 12 ' difference, and in most every ease in favor of experience and brains, having been Superintendent of the 
per cent over the first year’s at- The games will probably start next week and as they are going to be Wesson schools for two years and 
tendance. He also brought the close and exciting large crowds are expected. Superintendent of the Natchez 

college into closer relationship ! schools for six years, 

with the preachers of the two con- « Not only is Prof. Lin well quali- 

ferences which was proved by the RASFRAT I fied for his work - but he knows 

attendance of a greater number of xSAoIb.ISALi.Li. college life and college boys, an 

ministerial students and ministers’ Regulars Spank Scrubs, important adjunct to any teacher’s 

sons | qualifications. He talks interest- 

One of the most important inglv of -his own college career and 

achievements of his administration Ever since the Scrubs tied the Varsity the}' have been boosting shows he knows the way of the eol- 
was the separation of the college j their team, and were not satisfied until one day last week when the lege boy. 

department and the preparatory * Varsity met them on the Athletic field and administered to them a) Prof. Lin’s record is as follows: 
department. This had been a crv- crushing defeat. The game was a one sided affair from start to finish A. B. Emory College; Fellow in 
ing need for sometime and Dr. and although the Scrubs took their defeat good naturedly it taught j Vanderbilt University, 1894-96, M. 
Hull accomplished a great thing them a good lesson. A., \ anderbilt I niversity ; Super- 



for Millsaps when he made out of 



The game opened up with Brown on the firing line for the Scrubs, 



the regular pupaiator\ depart- aud p eas ^ er f or the Regulars. The Regulars started out at a rapid 
' ' " itory Sc’ 11 

change 



intendent Wesson Public Schools 
1899-1901 ; Supt. Natchez Public 
Schools 1901-1907 ; Supt. Alexan- 



ment Millsaps Preparatory School te which they kept up during the entire game, while the Scrubs I {h& ) schools 1907 . 1909 

were always at the mercy of Peaster. 



The success of the 
proved its wisdom. 

Another great movement for- The result of the game was not a surprise to all the broad minded 
ward that Millsaps made under fans but only to those who can see only one side of a thing. This was 
Dr. Hull was its development along the second time that the boys have been out, and considering the fact 
athletic lines. Not only did it se - 1 that they have not practiced any they showed up exceedingly well, 
cure intercollegiate athletics in [ Several of the new boys played a much better game than they did in 

the first game and that is a proof that with constant practice they will 
make good ball players. Many thanks are due Mr. Harry Peaster for 
his services as coach. He knows baseball thoroughly and we are sure 
that some of the players will greatly improve their baseball ability 
bv taking advantage of the points he has shown them. 



everything except football, but it 
built one of the best athletic fields 
in the South and a track celebrat- 
ed over the state for its complete- 
ness. 



Professor Philosophy and Educa- 
tion, Central College (Mo.) 1909- 
10; Sage Fellow in Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1910-1912; Instructor in 
Civics and History, . Univeisitv of 
Mississippi, summer terms of 1902- 
3-4; instructor in English Litera- 
ture and Psychology, Tulane Uni- 
versity, summer term of 1909 ; 
student in summer terms of 
Columbia University, 1908-1910. ■ 




2 



Cfre purple anD Mite 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

* Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 



i 

W. E. Morse. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 
K. M. Broom 

;..Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

' N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton. Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

I J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

j S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

j L. H. Gates Football Manager 

1 P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

1 W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Rav Addresses Association. 

The association met for the sec- 
ond time on Friday night and be- 
gan the meeting with a song ser- 
vice. Mr. Foster conducted the 
opening exercises and introduced 
the speaker, Olin Ray, stating that 
j the Y. M. C. A. was indebted to 



however, and his downfall gradual, 
but from the moment a Christian 
loses his grasp upon the things of 
Christianity his spiritual downfall 
is sudden and sure. 

The speaker discussed at length 
the influence of an ideal upon a 
man’s life. Someone has said that 
we are not what we are but what 
we wish to be. Certain it is that 
he who marches onward and up- 
ward with his eyes fixed upon a 
high ideal, whether or not it can 
be attained, will never falter or 
fail in the battle of life. It is sel- 
dom possible for us to attain our 
ideals but it is possible for us to 
approach thqm and profit by the 
inspiration that comes to us by 
looking upon higher things. Nor 
would we attain our ideals if we 
could, for then we could do noth- 
ing but lament, like Alexander, the 
absence of other worlds to conquer. 
But it is our duty and should be 



as one of the leading members of 
that body tendered his resignation 
as an officer, whereupon Prof. J. 
M. Burton, one of the best and 
most enthusiastic players on the 
campus was unanimously elected 
to the position. Prof. Burton has 
taken an active interest in the as- 
sociation since coming to Millsaps 
and will no doubt make it a most 
efficient official. Sam Lampton 
was then chosen as president of the 
association for the ensuing year. 
His executive ability has been 
amply displayed on numerous- oc- 
casions and the association is to 
be congratulated on securing his 
services as president. 

After an informal discussion of 
plans for the year and the tennis 
outlook in general, the house was 
adjourned. Those who wish to 
join the association can do so by 
applying to Prof. J. M. Burton. 



Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton. Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon —Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery. ..President 

J. C. Honeycutt .Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling - Secretary 

• Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. Carraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 



S. B. Lampton 


Senior. 

President 


J. C. Honeycutt 
F. H. McGee .... 


Vice President 

Secretary 


W. M. Cain 




D. J. Savage ..... 


Junior. 

President 


T. M. Cooper 


Vice President 


I. W. Howe 


Secretarv 


H. L. Lassiter. 


Treasurer 


Law. 



T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 



— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems. 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 



him for consenting to speak at the 
last moment. 

ill-. Ray read a passage in the 
Bible exhorting men to press for- 
ward toward the ideal. He said 
that there was a tendency among 
college men to lay aside their re- 
ligious life to devote their time to 
school work and the activities of 
college life. Such need not and 
should not be the ease. The records 
of men not only of this school but 
of all schools has shown that the 
deeper consecration of a man’s life 
usually comes during the years 
that he spends in school. Some one 
has said that a man will in nearly 
every case be through his life what 
he is when he leaves college. If 
this be true, and it is true, how can 
, we afford to miss the opportuni- 
| ties of allying ourselves with the , 
forces of Christianity and develop- ; 
ing ourselves spiritually as well as 
mentally ? 

The speaker in connection with 
this, called attention to the fact 
that there is no middle course in 
spiritual things. The man who is 
not for the better development of 
himself and others is against it. 
The swimmer must go upstream or 
down. He must battle with the j 

I 

current or drift with the tide. This 
is true in every sphere of the ma- 
terial world, Jmt. especially is it j 
true of the spiritual world. The j 
business man. the man who fights 
the battles of the practical world 



J our purpose to press forward 
toward the ideal as it was in 
Christ. 

After the conclusion of Mr. 
Ray’s address, the chairman in- 
troduced Dr. Kern, to discuss for 
a few moments the question of 
Bible study. Rather briefly he 
outlined the work of the Bible 
study classes last year. He told 
of the number of men who joined 
in little groups, reading a chapter 
each day and meeting once each 
week for a discussion of these 
seven chapters. Dr. Kern told of 
the benefit to be derived from a 
study of the Bible, benefits wjiieh 
I hope are known to most of us. 
The men were asked to pledge 
themselves to spend ten minutes 
each day in reading the Bible. A 
great many of those present sign- 
ed cards promising to do this. 

The association appreciates the 
attendance of the last two meet- 
ings and earnestly invites every 
man in college, whether a member 
'or not. to come out and meet to- 
gether in the one place where we 
may meet with a common purpose 
and with perfect harmony. 



TENNIS ASSOCIATION OR- 
GANIZED. 



Officers Elected. 

At a call meeting Thursday af- 
ternoon the organization of the 
Tennis Association was perfected 



R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 



must keep steadily onward if he and plans for the year discussed, 
would meet with that financial sue- . Dr. M. W. Swartz who for several 
i cess which he desires. His lack of years past has been secretary and 
success might be imperceptible treasurer of the association as well 




OCIETy 
PINS & 

emblems 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 



of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson, Miss. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the Jackson 
Steam Laundry 
and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPICKS 





Che purple anD ISHbite 



Societies 



Lamars Have Interesting Program 
Election Night. 

The Lamars were kept exceed- 
ingly busy last Friday night, 
carrying out one of the strongest 
programs in the history of the so- 
ciety, initiating new men into their 
ranks and pulling off the annual 
election of officers and speakers. 

The first thing on the slate was 
an oration by C. H. Blewett who 
stepped forth and expounded in a 
most eloquent and impressive man- 
ner. 

So well did Blewett acquit him- 
self that he was rewarded with the 
important position of Mid-Session 
Orator. 

The debate which followed was 
a most enthusiastic discussion of 
that question which for several 
months past has proved a most in- 
teresting and spicy subject for 
men throughout the United States. 
It was “Resolved, that it would 
be better for the United States for 
Roosevelt to be elected president 
in preference to Taft.” Weems 
and Talbot ably presented the 
claims of the affirmative side while 
Jolly and Scott eulogized Taft at 
the same time taking some strong 
shots at their opponent’s speeches 
and candidate. Messrs. Sterling, 
Gathings and Tucker acting in the 
capacity of judges rendered the 
decision in favor of the affirmative. 

After the debate came what is 
probably the most important event 
of the year — the annual election. 
Never has there been an election 
pulled off with more ease and good 
feeling than this one. 

A complete list of the election 
returns is as follows: 

Anniversarian — H. H. Boswell. 

Anniversary Orator — F. T. 
Scott. 

Hendrix Debater — =J. T. Weems. 

A. & M. Debater— R. E. Selby. 

Mississippi College Debater — J. 
B. Kirkland. 

Mid-Session Debaters — C. A. 
Williams, J. M. Talbot. 

Mid-Session Orator — C. H. 
Blewett. 

Commencement Debaters — Olin 
Ray, R. I. Jolly. 

President First Term — W. B. 
Montgomery. 

Vice President — J. C. Honey- 
cutt. 

Secretary — Bob Sterling. 

Treasurer— G. W. Harrison. 



Censor — W. E. Hobbs. 

Corresponding Secretary — F. T. 
Scott. 

Critic — H. H. Boswell. 

Chaplain — J. T. Weems. 

President Anniversary — F. H. 
McGee. 

Doorkeeper — J. B. Kirkland. 

The above officers and speakers 
are especially well fitted for the 
various positions which they hold 
and will reflect honor and glory 
I on the society. Boswell, the anni- 
versarian needs no introduction 
as an orator to college circles. His 
being unanimously elected to this 
the highest honor in the gift of the 
society is itself assurance that he 
will creditably fill the position. 

Frank Scott is also an excellent 
speaker and will fill the position 
of anniversary orator with distinc- 
tion and credit both to himself | 
and the society. 

Weems is recognized by all the 
J members of the society as the one 
man best fitted to bring back a 
decision over Hendrix College, ' 
! while the Triangular Debates will 
no doubt be safe entrusted to such 
eminent debaters as Kirkland and j 
Selby. 

The other debaters and officers | 
are all strong, able men and we | 
do not fear but that at the end of 
the session the Lamars will have 
nothing but joy over having en- 
trusted the good name and fame of 
the society into their keeping. 

SENIOR CLASS ELECTION. 

Hon. Sam B. Lampton Elected 
President. 

The Senior Class held its first 
meeting of the session Tuesday af- 
ternoon, Oct. 1st. The meeting 
w as called to order by Mr. J. B. i 
Kirkland, president of ’13’s class' 
in 1912. The class immediately ; 
went into the election of ’13 ’s of- 
ficers for this session. 

The following were elected : 

S. B. Lampton, president. 

J. B. Honeycutt, vice president. 

F. H. McGee, secretary. 

W. M. Cain, treasurer. 

Miss Hortense Smith, prophet. 

Miss Janie Linfield, historian. 

Miss Rosa Howard, poet. 

H. H. Boswell, liar. 

J. T. Weems and F. H. McGee, 
honor council. 

After the election of officers it 
was moved that a committee be ap- 
pointed to confer with Dr. Kern in j 
regard to getting out the annual ! 



DIRECTORY 



tat) T? IT p AT I AW A V V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 

Ult. Ej. XI. uALiLU TY/il THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. n „ n , , 

Robertson & Robertson 

Second Floor Kress Building Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 

Phone 316 Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J/2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



DR. G. M. GALLOWAY GREEN TREE HOTEL 

DENTIST RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 

)ffice over Kress. Room 1. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 

z' u m _ on a n 



Office over Kress. 



Cumb. Phone 2013. 



DR. E. A. MAY 



DENTIST 



408-411 Century Building 



Phone 2007. 



JACKSON, MISS. 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 

Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 

BOYS, DRINK 
Robinson Springs Water 

If You Don't Know Why, Ask B. M.j 
or Phone 1280. 

Robinson Springs (Inc.) 

Century Building. 

OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. . 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 

Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. | 
512 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 
HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 



RAH, RAH, RAH, 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

ADVERTISE 

in 

Cbc Purple anD ffllbitt 
and 

GET RESULTS 

RAH, RAH, RAH, 
HAH, HAH, HAH. 



Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the "M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 

Call and see our Fountain Pens, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 

for this session : The"personnel of | confer with Dr. Kern at once and 
the committee appointed by Presi- 1 report at the earliest possible mo- 
dent Lampton is as follows: , ment. 

Boswell, Scott, Weems and Wro- TUere being no further business 
ten. before the class the meeting was 

This committee was requested to ; adjourned. 



Cpe purple anD White 



Cl )c Purple anD iKHlnte 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Miilsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Edltor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott .Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry -..Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. Gates Asst. Business Manager 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in Jiis hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers— 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 I 



OUR DEBATERS. 

We believe that the plans sug- 
gested by Dr. Watkins and other; 
members of the faculty for chang- 
ing the method of selecting the 
men who should represent us in 
the different intercollegiate de- j 
bates, a most laudable and com- 
mendable one, provided several 
seemingly adverse conditions can 
be coped with in a successful man- 
ner. and we join with them in the 
hope that the societies will give it 
a thorough and careful considera- 
tion. 

As we understand it, the sugges- 
tion was that every man in school, 
regardless of class distinctions or 
society affiliations, who desires to ■ 
do so may take part in a competi- 
tive debate, instituted for the pur- 
pose of selecting six men to repre- ; 
sent the college in these contests. 

This seems to us to be in most 
respects the logical manner to se- 
lect the very best men possible as 
our representatives. However, as 
we have suggested before, we be- 
lieve that there are certain condi- 
tions to be dealt with before the 
plan can become in all respects an 
ideal one. The first of these is that 
it has been the custom for each of 
the societies to furnish a debater 
for each college and each society 
has defrayed its share of the ex- 
penses. If the condition should 
arise that a majority or all of the 
debaters should be chosen from one 
society it would be hardly fair to 



ask the others to help defray ex- 
. penses and too much of a burden 
on the one society to put up all of 
them. 

Again, there would come up the 
j question as to whether or not the 
j most capable debaters would enter 
into the contests. The men who 
I are the best speakers and debaters 
in school are generally among the 
j busiest ones and while one of these 
might be prevailed upon to accept 
a position as representative debat- 
er of the college he might consider 
that he had not the time to pre- 
pare an extra debate and one too 
j where he would be forced to com- 
pete for the position, with the pos- 
, sibility of loosing out altogether. 

On the other hand, a lively, 
hard fought preliminary contest 
would be an excellent training for 
| the final event and we believe that 
if the above conditions can be suc- 
] cess fully dealt with the adoption 
| of the new plan will be a progres- 
sive movement that will prove a ! 
very satisfactory method of choos- 
ing the debaters. 

FOOTBALL. 

It is but fitting that at this sea- 
son of the year the attention of the 
student body in general should be 
turned to football. In spite of this 
fact and in spite of the fact also 
that there has been much said con- 
cerning this great college game, 
very little has been done at Mill- 
saps this year towards organizing 
the usual class teams. 

A careful analysis of the foot- , 
ball situation would disclose the 
fact that this condition is probably 
due to one or more of three causes 
— the first is the fact that we are 
not permitted to participate in in- 
ter-collegiate football — and on ac- 
count of this there is not as much 
incentive to work for a football 
team as there is in the other phases 
of athletics. This drawback is 
partly overcome, however, by the 
fact that a varsity team is always 
chosen from the various class 
teams and it is considered as much 
honor to be placed in this list of | 
varsity men as it would be if they [ 
contested against other schools. 

The second handicap is the fact 
that up until last week there has j 
been no football manager, but with 
the election on last Thursday, the 
difficulty along this line is settled, j 

The last reason is that on ac- 
count of the excellent baseball | 



coach who has been with us dur- 1 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
MEETS. 



j ing the last week or so, more at- j MEETS. 

tention has been paid to baseball 1 

than football. Baseball practice j Vacant Offices Filled, 
has now been abandoned and the The election of the officers of the 
other objections overcome, so there i athletic association last Thursday 
is absolutely nothing in the way of night was an affair teeming with 
having a good, spicy series of inter interest and enthusiasm. The 
class games of football. Let every lines were tightly drawn and the 
man who can do so come out and work of trained and experienced 
try for a team and those who feel politicians very much in evidence, 
indisposed to do this come out and The result was the addition of a 
encourage your class team by root- goodly number of members to the 
ing for them and cheering them ranks of the association and the 
I on to victory. election of a highly efficient corp 

j of officers consisting of the follow- 

JUNIOR CLASS ELECTION. '"p resident _ K . T Scott . 

j Vice President — S. L. Crockett. 

Savage Chosen President. Football Manager — Jack T. 



JUNIOR CLASS ELECTION. 



Savage Chosen President. 



One of the most important Gaddis, 
events of the past week was the Assistant Baseball Manager- 
election of officers by the Junior | yj Broom. 

Class. These near seniors always Scott is well known on the cam- 

assume a very dignified and im- pus an( j h i s ability as an executive 

portant air when there is any busi- officer is questioned by no one. 

! ness to be performed, consequent- Crockett is likewise a good man 

; ly it was with very scholarly and arK i w ;n com e up to all expec-ta- 

dignified mien that they assembled I t ions. Gaddis is an enthusiastic 

to elect the following officers to athletic man, having made both 

control the affairs of the Junior the baseball and the football 

Class for the year 1912-13. teams last year. Broom will make 

President — D. J. Savage. | Boswell a good assistant and is a 

Vice-President — T. M. Cooper. | good man to line up for manager 

Secretary — D. W. Howe. next year. 

Treasurer — H. L. Lassiter. «■ 

Historian — Miss Stella McGee. Statement of the Ownership, Manage- 

Poct— Miss B G Steen ment ’ Circulation, Etc., 

oei iliss 13. fx. Steen. I of p urp j e an( j White, published week- 

Liar — H. L. Lassiter. j ly, at Jackson, required by the Act of 

Snort— J B Cain I August 24, 1912. 

opon t). v am. Editor, H. H. Boswell, Jackson, Miss. 

Honor Council — S. L. Crockett. Business manager, *J. B. Kirkland, 

j j a cbson IVIiss 

No one doubts the efficiency of Publisher, Tucker Printing House, 
these officers and it has been pre- '• Jackson, Miss. 

dieted by many that these hoqors \ Business Manager, 

are onlv the earnest of more nu- Sworn to and subscribed before me 

,, this 7th day of October, 1912. 
merous ones to come to these A. C. POWELL. 

Juniors during their college ca- . Notary Public. 

(My commission expires March 12. 
reer - 1 1916.) 



YOUR ORDER 

For that Fall and Winter Suit really belongs to us 
if you are particular at all about what you get for 
your money. We believe our store should be your 
store, when thinking of ordering a Suit or Overcoat. 
The only inducements we can offer you are de- 
pendable fabrics, honest values, stylish and durable 
tailoring. 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW 



MADE 
TO YOUR 
MEASURE 



$15 



GUARANTEED 

TO 

FI T 



STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 



€bc J^utplc anO Catjitc 




TATOM SHOE CO. 

* 415 East Capitol St. 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 



An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SEUTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the 
largest and best equipped in the South, where you can get 
high grade work at reasonable prices, made by some of the 
most expert Photographers in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly 
come and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 



Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 



Lau) Department 



After a campaign notable for its 
bitterness and villification Messrs. 
Russell and Butler, respectively, 
have been elected to the offices of 
Sheriff and Circuit Clerk. There 
is talk of a contest but it is hardly 
probable, for Judge Nason, a mod- 
ern Boss Tweed, is in charge of the 
election machinery. 

John Paul Waugh in a Smashup. 

The friends of Mr. John Paul 
Waugh in this city and on Wall 
street were very much alarmed 
Sunday when it was announced 
that Mr. Waugh had been injured 
in a R. R. wreck. Mr. Waugh 
boarded east bound P. & Q. train 
No. 3 at the union station in this 
city on Sunday evening and was 
scarcely seated before he came [ 
near losing his life. As is the cus- 
tom, the railroad company was ad- 
ding a sleeper here and it was run 
into the train with so much vio- 
lence -that the force of the jolt 
threw the local coal baron and iron 
king to the floor seriously jolting 
and internally injuring him. He 
was immediately conveyed to his 
apartment at the Verdant Tree | 
Hotel by Drayman, Peg DeLoach. j 
Mr. Waugh has filed suit against 



the R. R. Company for the sum of j 
$50,000.00. In his declaration it 
is averred that he has suffered 
great physical pain and mental 
anguish, and that he, also, failed 
to conclude a very advantageous 
deal involving $150,000.00 because i 
of his inability to continue the 
journey to Birmingham for which 
city he was bound at the time of 
the accident. The R. R. will en- 
deavor to show that Mr. Waugh 
was without a ticket and therefore | 
a tresspasser and is not entitled to 
recover. The plaintiff is represent- 
ed by Messrs. Green, Donald and 
Adam and the defendant by 
Messrs. Logue, Dabney and Scar- 
borough. 



The Moot Court has been organ- 
ized and will meet in the Lamar 
Literary Society Hall on next 
Monday night. The case before 
the court is the suit of J. P. 
Waugh against the P. & Q. R. R. 
Co., for $50,000.00, being the 
amount of damages claimed by 
Waugh because of injuries receiv- 
ed in a recent wreck on said road. 









You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Kenninotons 



Everybody is talking about 
“strike-out” Brown’s pitching. 
He is making good in other ways 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 










6 



Oc purple anD ffllfttte 




Freshmen Hillman want to 
know if they give a post-graduate 
course in matrimony at this insti- 
tution. 

On ! On ! Steadily marching ! ! I 

The fair is the next goal. Bro. Purcell, an old Millsaps 

man, who is filling an appointment 

Boys! See Hobbs, the college at Florence, was on the campus 
barber for good barbering. Friday. 



R. E. Selby spent a few days at 
home with “pa” last week. 



Jack Gaddis spent last Saturday 
and Sunday with home people. 



Leroy Ratliff went home last 
Sunday to rest up a few days be- 
fore returning to take up school 
duties. 



Mr. Evans of Decatur, was vis-j 
iting Jolly and Williams one day j 
last week. 

Dr. Borum will address the Y. 
M. C. A. tonight. Be sure to hear 
foim. 



“Bish” Murrah, one of last 
year’s most popular freshmen, re- 
turned Saturday, much to the de- 
light of his many friends. 



FOR - THE - YOUNG - MAN 



“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



DRINK CARBONATED 



Robert H. Ruff, ’10, was on the 
campus Saturday and Sunday vis- 
iting friends and frat mates. 



“Dot” Lassiter ran on the Bull 
Moose ticket in the recent class 
elections and was elected class liar 
for the third successive term. 



Boys, call at Sistrunk ’s and get a | 
cigar, a drink and your stationery 
supplies. 



Jack Brewer and Bob Harmon 
were initiated in the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity Saturday night. 



Prof. Lin: (Trying to arrange 
conflicts) “This faculty has ’gotta 
quit kicking my dog around.” 



Boys, have your Tailoring don* 
at Doxey’s, and save the special 
discount which he gives to College 
boys. 3t 



Jack Frost, one of the old Kap- 
pa Sigma boys, was on the campus 
a few days last week visiting 
friends and frat-inates. 



Millsaps is proud to number , 
among her law students this year 
Mr. J. E. Johnson, former superin- 1 
tendent of education of Panola 
county. 



Bro. Andrews who is assisting 
Bro. Morse in a revival at the sec- 
ond Methodist church, conducted 
chapel exercises Wednesday morn- 
ing. 



M. W. Moore was called home to 
the bed-side of his mother last 
Sunday who was quite sick. We 
sincerely hope she is much im- 
proved by this time. 



Who said that Frank Tatom 
called up the information bureau 
at the telephone exchange to find 
out what his English lesson was? 



Jolly: “Sterling, what would 




FOLDING MACHINE PLANT 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing a battery of 
five of the latest model folding machines. 



Established 1824 j 



Rensselaer /-» n < 

Polytechnic Coca=Cola 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. EL), Electrical Engineering (E. E.) t aad | 
General Science (B. S.). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT. Registrar. 



IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



College Boys! 

Trade with and meet your friends at our store. We want you 
to feel at home in our place of business. 

We want your drug business. Remember! “The Old Reliable 
Drug Store” is The Best in the city.' Prescription work our specialty, 
all prescriptions being filled by a graduate and registered druggist. 
We send for and deliver youj; prescriptions to the campus. 

The most complete stock in Jackson of STATIONERY, CANDIES, 
CIGARS, best, good and better. FOUNTAIN PENS, the perfect ones. 
BRUSHES of all kinds, TOILET ARTICLES, RUBBER GOODS; in 
fact, everything to be found in an up-to-date Drug Store. 

Remember the place. All cars lead to our door. 

We deliver quick. Try us. Phones 109 and 1499. 

Hunter & McGee 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Your SMOKERS and RECEPTIONS will not be complete unless 
you will let 

MANGUM 

serve you. He knows how and will do it reasonably. He also carries 
the best line of 

FANCY CANDY 

to be found in the City qf Jackson. The best that’s made. When 
down town don’t forget to* drink at his Soda Fountain where only the 
best of everything is served College Men. 

Headquarters for Millsaps Collegians. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



Cfte Purple anD fliHjrite 



7 



you do if you should meet Regan every species of a politician have 
and Montgomery in the woods t ” I been developed from a self-confess- 
Sterling : ‘ ‘ Gee ; I wouldn ’t j ed bribe taking Bilbo to a bolting 



meet them unless I was crippled.” 



Teddy. 



Everett Truly (Judge), an old 
MHlsaps varsity man, was here 
Thursday. “Judge” is practicing 
law at Fayette this year and is 
making good. 



Harold: (In Physics 

Mr. Ward what is 



Hon. Sam I. Osborne ’07, a 
prominent member of the Green- 
wood bar spent Sunday of last 
week with Judge James A. Blount 
and other friends. 



Prof. 

J Class) 

| space ?” 

Mr. Ward: “Er, Er, ’Fessor I 
can’t just exactly explain it, but I 
got it in my head all right.” 



Among the “can’t come backs” 
who are teaching this year, are 
Bill Colmer, A. G. Gainey, Sam 
Sargent and Allbritton. They are 
making men for us in after years. 



We were very glad indeed to see 
Bill Thomas’ smiling face back 
among us last week. Bill says he 
is going to China to teach the 
ideas of the little “Chinks” how to 
shoot. 



Prof. Lin: (In Economics class) 
“Mr. Jones discuss the law of 
Supply and Demand.” 

“Big-foot” Jones : Trade works 
automatically ’Fessor. The man- 
ufacturer makes any size shoes, 
feeling sure he will find feet to fill 
them all.” 



Columbia Military Academy 
sends us another good man this 
year in Hal Backstrum. Hal hails 
from Water Valley and comes to 
us with a good recommendation as 
a ball player. 



James McClure, Jr., is another | 
man who is encumbered with a 
recommendation as a good, all 
round fellow and a ball player 
thrown in. Here’s hoping he will 
live up to it. 

The past week has been a week 
of , elections. Politics have been j 
freely indulged in and almost ! 



Mr. L. C. Smith who is leading 
the singing services at the Second 
Methodist church, gave us two 
beautiful selections entitled, ‘ ‘ Ship 
Ahoy” and “Keep Sweet,” Wed- 
nesday morning at chapel exer- ! 
cises. They were very much en- 
joyed by all. 

GALLOWAYS HOLD IMPORT- 
ANT MEETING. 

The Galloway Literary Society 
held its second meeting for this 
year Tuesday night, Oct. 4. This 
meeting was looked forward to hv t 
many with fear and trembling as 
it was election night. In fact, lit- 
tle was done except elect officers 
and speakers for the ensuing year. 
This was done in a business way. 
the reputation of the society and 
college being considered of more 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 

CITY DEPOSITORY. 

% 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43,332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

Li. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green. Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up, 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50e. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



GALLE TAILORING CO. 

417 y 2 E. Capitol Street 

We do all kinds of Altering, Repairing, Cleaning 
and Pressing at Reasonable Prices. 

OLD PHONE 618 



ATTEND THE BEST 



HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The Only Business University in the South 

We have no branch schools and devote our 
ENTIRE time to ONE INSTITUTION which 
POSITIVELY enables us to give our students 
Jhe CREAM of Business Training. 



We are as good as the best, 

And are better than all the rest. 





8 



Che Purple and Wbitt 



Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 



College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



S. P. McRAE 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 
Hats, Mann’s Leonard & Benbow 
Shoes, Silver and Eagle Brand 
Collars, Ides’ Shirts. Special 
Prices to College Boys. 

214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 




The popular “ Belmont ” notch Collar 
made in self striped Madras. 2 for 25c 

AR-R.OW 

COLLARS 

Cluett, Peahody & Co., Makers 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show YOU 



j importance than the ambitions of 
any individual. 

After the initiation of several ( 
new members, the society entered 
into the election. The political j 
machine seemed to he well oiled | 
and when once started was hard 
to stop. This machine was not a 
steam-roller either. Every man, 
with two exceptions, was elected 
by acclamation. 

The three coveted places on the 
ticket were Anniversarian, Anni- J 
j versary Orator and first term ; 
j President. A senior, J. D. Wroten 
was elected anniversarian. He is 
] in every way qualified for the 
place, having won both the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore contests and 
was Anniversary Orator last year. 
The choice for Anniversary Orator 
fell to a junior, S. L. Crockett. 

I Crockett not only won the 
Freshman contest but last year 
i won the Sophomore contest and 
the debaters medal at the Millsaps- j 
A. & M. debate at Moorhead. A 
dignified junior in the person of 

D. J. Savage was elected first term 
president. Mr. Savage is not a 
stranger to the duties of this of- 

j fice, having gracefully presided 
over the society several times last 
year while serving as vice presi- 
dent. The other offices, too numer- 
ous to mention, were filled by men 
peculiarly fitted for their respect- 
ive places. 

The harmony and good feel- 
ing prevailing throughout the 
meeting speaks well for the future 
of the society. 

The following officers and speak- 
ers were chosen : 

First term: 

President — D. J. Savage. 

Vice President — T. C. Willing- 
ham. 

Secretary — T. L. Carraway. 

Assistant Secretary — C. Bullock. 

Treasurer — U. B. Hathorn. 

Anniversary : 

President — W. S. Burns. 

Anniversarian — J. D. Wroten. 

Anniversary Orator — S. L. 
Crockett. 

Commencement Debate : 

President — R. T. Henry. 

Debaters — W. W. Moore, R. C. 
Edwards. 

Mid-Session Debate: 

President — C. C. Clark. 

Debaters — R. H. Harmon, K. M. j 
Brown. 

Triangular Debaters — N. B. 
Harmon, S. H. Frazier. 

Hendrix College Debater — W. : 

E. Morse. — 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 

$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$1.50, $1.75, $2 
TRY THEM 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. \V. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. • 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 






Vol. V. 



DR. BORUM SPEAKS AT 
Y. M. C. A. 



Last Friday night the Y. M. O'. 
A. was addressed by Dr. W. A. 
Borum, pastor of the First Baptist 
church. Dr. Borum spoke in his 
usual happy style and assured the 
boys that it gave him much pleas- 
ure to be at Millsaps. This we 
can easily believe from the inter- 
est he has taken in our work in 
the past and the number of times 
he has consented to speak to us. 
Indeed, Dr. Borum is no stranger 
to the strident body who have al- 
ways found in him a warm friend. 

Dr. Borum stressed the idea of 
serviee and spoke of the three 
planes of Christian living. We 
must choose on what plane we 
would live. The first plane is that 
of the man who is a church mem- 
ber and can say he is a Christian 
but had rather not talk on the sub- 
ject. This man’s religion does 
him little good, certainly he does 
not enjoy it. He considers it more 
of an aid to keep him out of hell 
than to help him lead a useful life. 
On the second plane is the man 
who is fully conscious of his sal- 
vation. He recognises the Father- 
hood of God and seeks to make his 
life conform to the divine will. 
The third plane is that of the man 
who is filled with the spirit of God. 
This last plane cannot be reached 
except by prayer and waiting be- 
fore God. Dr. Borum showed to 
reach these planes of Christian 
usefulness a student did not have 
to sacrifice his part in college ac- 
tivities but that the Christian stu- 
dent was the leader in all phases of 
college life. 

Professor Lin of the Millsaps 
faculty will address the association 
next Friday night. His subject has 
not been announced but rest as- 
sured that it will be something 
good. 



Y. M. C. A. SECRETARY 
VISITS MILLSAPS. 

The student body and especial- 
ly the Y. M. C. A members were 

(Continued on page 3) 



QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1912 No. 3. 



BASKET BALL ^ 



WINNING TEAM A CERTAINTY 
Personnel of the Team 

The interest taken in basket ball here on the part of h goodly | 
number of the fellows is attracting the attention of the athletic man- 
agers and coaches. 

A coach has been secured in the person of Mr. Fletcher. He has 
gained the confidence of all and from the side lines, one would be 
able to select a marked degree of improvement in the way the “fel- 
lows” handle the ball. 

Coach Fletcher is an all round athlete. Many of the Millsaps 
fellows remember well that it was this lad who took the honors on the j 
track at Gulfport two years ago. He is an able man and we feel ; 
no little degree of confidence that he will soon develop a winning j 
team, second to none in the state. 

Manager Kirkland has the interest of the team at heart, and is 
planning an exc-ellant schedule for the coming season. 

Nolan Harmon, one of last year’s Varsity men. is showing up 
well and promises to make good at forward. 

Robert Harmon, another of last year’s Varsity, is showing up 
well as the other forward. Both of these youngsters are fleet of foot j 
and deadshots at the goal. 

Burns, last year’s “star” guard is back at his old post and is 
playing in his usual form. He covers the court well and is a sure 
shot at goal. 

Bell, also a last year’s man, is showing up well in practice. He I 
is going to make some one hustle for a place on this year’s team. 

Cook hails from Crystal Springs, whffe he was a guard on the 
Higli School team which won the championship of the state in 1911. 

Frazier is tlm only man who will make the team without opposi- 
tion. So far he has had no opponent for center. He knows the game 
from one to twenty-seven, inclusive, and the man who makes center 
over him will have to eat yeast three times a day. 

Henry, R. T.. is an excellent guard and in ease of an emergency 
can play center. “High Henry” is a last year’s man and knows the 
game. AYe are watching him for it would not surprise us if he should 
make the Varsity. 

Henry, E. E.. is a new man with us hut is by no means a new 
man in the game. He handles the hall well and is quite a good goaler. | 

Broomfield is showing that he has the qualities of a good basket i 
ball man. His coolness in the game makes him of great value. Coach 
Fletcher has his eye on him. 

The presence of Cain, the “Greek Shark.” is noted with interest 
during practice. He is slow but sure and we are inclined to believe 
that should he be able to gain about 75 pounds he woidd make the 
Varsity. 

Lauderdale, A loo re and Ray are trying out and it would not be 
any great surprise should some good men come from among these. 

The boys wish to thank Dr. E. Y. Burton for his untiring efforts 
towards athletics, and to show their appreciation they are coming out 
in large numbers to try and make the teams the best that can be got- 
ten out. 



SELF-HELP AT MILLSAPS 
COLLEGE. 



By Alfred Allan Kern. 

In a recent address before the 
National Educational Association 
the President of a Western uni- 
versity denounced our universities 
as the loafing places of luxury and 
as winter resorts for the sons of 
the wealthy. Doubtless, he was, 
to a certain extent at least, correct 
in his statements. Contemperane- 
ous. however, with his denuncia- 
tion of the growing luxury and 
licentiousness of our educational 
institutions come the reports of 
the self-help bureaus in our va- 
rious colleges, which present a 
more hopeful picture of another 
side of college life and show that 
democracy is also on the increase 
in American universities. 

Thus, the daughter of President 
Butler, of Columbia LTniversitv, 
was among the freshman waiters 
at Barnard College during the 
past session. An investigation at 
Oberlin disclosed the fact that one- 
fourth of all the women in the col- 
lege were either partially or whol- 
ly self-supporting, and that anoth- 
er ten per cent were earning mon- 
ey toward their education. From 
the Yale bureau of self-help comes 
the statement that five hundred 
students in the university are eith- 
er wholly or in part working their 
way through college. The ways 
and means employed by these en- 
terprising five hundred students 
are almost as many and as varied 
as the students themselves; they 
range all the way from acting as 
professional pallbearers for the 
New Haven funerals at two dollars 
a funeral (“planting stiffs,” as it 
is called in Yale self-help circles) 
to winning scholarships and acting 
as assistants in the laboratories. 

It is furthermore a hopeful sign 
for American democracy that the 
men who work their way through 
college are in no sense looked down 
upon by their classmates. There 
are certain occupations which in- 
crease rather than lessen a man’s 
chances for the class presidency or 





Cije purple anO Mite 



Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selbv 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson ..Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 



Twoczett 

& 

Si emblems 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY 

Dr. A. F. Watkins 

Dr. E. Y. Burton.. 

Dr. A. A. Kern.... 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan. 

Dr. M. W. Swartz. 

FRATERNITIES. 
Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon _ 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

E. F. Foster 



Librarian 



Vice President 
Treasurer 



PH WE CARRY IN 
E|||j STOCK FULL 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



Secretary 



Secretary 



Phi Delta 



J. R. Gathings 



Sigma Upsilon 



for similar honors. Not many 
years ago the degree of Bachelor 
! of Ugliness, the highest honor in 
the gift ol' the student body of 
Vanderbilt, was bestowed upon a 
student who had worked his way 
through the university from his 
freshman year. The Federated 
School and Sectional Club of Yale 
has been making a special effort to 
secure future students who are 
willing to earn their way through 
college because they have discover- 
ed that many of the graduates who 
have brought most honor to their 
Alma Mater have been recruited 
from among this class of young 
men. 

Apropos of this movement in our 
colleges, I have thought that the 
results obtained by the census 
which was taken by the self-help 
bureau of Millsaps College might 
prove of interest and of aid to trie 
readers of the Advocate — of inter- 
est in that they can therein see 
what is being done to help needy 
students in one of the Church’s 
own colleges, and of aid in that 
other colleges may perhaps get 
therefrom a suggestion which will 
increase the efficiency of their own 
self-help bureaus. 

Last May each student was giv- 
en a blank slip on which he was 
asked to report the amount he had 
earned during the session and the 
ways in which he had earned it. 
Out of the one hundred and fifty- 
nine students who reported there 
were sixty-nine one way or anoth- 
er earned money during the .col- 
lege year. A condensed report of 
Anniversary Orator the census is given below, showing 
ps-Hendrix Debater occupation, amount earned, and 
number engaged. 

Mrn.Sessmn OriUnr Ministerial work S 2.4 n) b 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 



D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

P. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton. Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N F Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery 

J. C. Honeycutt. ' 

G. W. Harrison 

Bob Sterling - 

Galloway. 



Second door east of Ken 
nington’s big store 
Jackson, Miss. 



Instructor in college 

Printing 

Reporter for paper 

Selling coal 

Tutoring L 

Selling pennants 

Agricultural work 

( 'arpenter — 

Census taking 

Work on athletic field 

Stenographer _ 

Miscellaneous 



President 

.Vice President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 



SAY BOYS! 



President 

Vice President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 



D. J. Savage 

T. C. Willingham 

C. Bullock 

T. L. Carrawav.. 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the Jackson 
Steam Laundry 
and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Prentiss. 



...President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



N. Golding 
C. w. Alford. 
L. B. Bufkin 
L. H. Gates. 



CLASSES. 

Senior. 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



S. B. Lampton 
J. C. Honeycutt 

F. H. McGee 

W. M. Cain 



seen 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 



President 

.Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



D. J. Savage. 
T. M. Cooper 



A NEW DRUG STORE 



SOPHOMORE 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



R. H. Harmon 
K. M. Broom.. 

C. Bullock 

G. W. Harrisc 



An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fanev ices and ice creams. 



FRESHMAN 



Presidr.t 



T. L. Carraway 

J. N. McNeil 

Miss Fannie Buck 



.Vice President 
Secretary 



President 

.Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



J. A. Blount. 



Dabney 



Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
vour drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 



(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 



Oc pucple anD COhitc * 3 



DIRECTORY 



that preaching, clerking in the 
city stores, and writing insurance 
were the most lucrative occupa- 
tions, and that the first two, to- 
gether with attending to stock, de- 
livering papers, acting as agents 
for laundries, and pressing clothes, 
• were the most popular “profes- 
sions. ’ ’ 

An examination of the grades in 
the secretary’s book showed, fur- 
thermore, that the scholarship of 
those who were working their way 
through college was superior to 
that of the students who did no 
outside work. Thus, to give but 
one test, the sixty-nine workers 
made seventy-eight grades between 
ninety and one hundred, while the 
ninety non-workers made only 
seventy-four such grades. Had the 



Christian character. At four 
o’clock in the afternoon Mr. Mont- 
gomery met with the cabinet of the 
Y. M. C. A. together with all mem- 
bers of the Bible study committee. 
Methods were discussed and plans 
talked over for making this the 
best year in Y. M. C. A. work es- 
pecially in study of the Bible as 
the great message to college men. 
Mr. Montgomery was with us 
again on Wednesday morning and 
conducted chapel services. 

But by far the greatest message 
was the one on Tuesday night, 
when he spoke to quite a number 
of the young men in the Y. M. C. 
A. hall on Bible study. The speak- 
er brought to us more clearly the 
needs of the student for knowledge 
of the Bible. At the conclusion of 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J4 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 



The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 









t ' 



percentage of failures among the 
students been computed, it would 
have resulted in an even more fa- 
vorable showing for the self-help 
men, and. this, notwithstanding the 
faet that the co-eds, who are as a 
rule better students than the men, 
were for the most part classed 
among the non-workers. Certain- 
ly there is no ground for believing 
that outside work as a whole in- 
terferes with scholarship. 

It should be added that the self- 
help bureau at Millsaps deserves 
but slight credit for the showing 
here made; it is due almost entire- 
ly to individual initiative and de- 
monstrates clearly the fine possi- 
bilities in this field of work for 
the self-help bureau of the Y. M. 
C. A. With a better organized bu- 
reau. such as we hope to have next 
year, the total amount earned 
would be increased at least thirty 
per cent and the whole movement 
placed upon a moi*e secure and set- 
tled working basis. 

(Continued fron Page I) 

pleased to have with us on Tues- 
day and Wednesday of last week, 
Mr. J. N. Montgomery, traveling 
secretary of the Association from 
Alabama. Mr. Montgomery was 
the guest of Dr. Kern while here, i 
He made acquaintance with a 
large number of the students and 
did much toward creating an in- 
terest in Y. M. C. A. work. 

On Tuesday morning at chapel 
he spoke to the student body on 
the subject of forming character. 
He appealed to the boys, taking as 
the basis of his remarks the words 
of the Bible, to do those things 
and only those things which stand 
for the development of the highest 



his remarks several pledged them- 
selves to give ten minutes each day 
to a study of this great book. 

We are very glad to have had 
Mr. Montgomery with us and hope 
that he will come again. 



Rensselaer 

Polytechnic 

god Science Institute 

Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
| gineering < M. E.), Electrical Engineering it. Ej, and 
i General Science ' B. S. ). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showirg 
work of gradna'es and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT. Registrar. 



MISSISSIPPI STATE 
! FAIR 

* 

J ackson, Miss. 
OCTOBER 21-26, 1912. 

An Immense Display of Farm 
Products 

Horse. Cattle, Sheep, Swine, Poultry 
and Pet Stock, Vegetables, Fruits, 
Grains and Grasses, Farm Machinery, 
Automobiles, Carriages, Wagons, Mer- 
chants Displays, Musical Instruments, 
Flowers, Fancy Work, Plants, Pic- ■ 
tures. Culinary and Household Artl- . 
cles. Silo, Good Roads and Dairy 
Demonstrations. 

Will Last One Week Only 

Special Reduced Railroad Rates on 
all Railroads. One Fare Plus 
Twenty-Five Cents for the 
Round Trip. 

Fairs are best means of recreation | 
and education and all should attend 
as many fairs as possible, but, above 
all, do not miss this Fair. 

Address Secretary 

j. m. McDonald 

For Catalog. 



I)R. G. M. GALLOWAY 

DENTIST 

Office over Kress. Room 1. 

Cumb. Phone 2013. 



DR. E* A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 

BOYS, DRINK 
Robinson Springs Water 

If You Don’t Know Why, Ask B. M. 
or Phone 1280. 

Robinsoit Springs (Inc.) 

Century Buildin’g. 



GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 

Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117.' 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 
HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

HALL DRUG COMPANY 
Jackson, Miss. 



LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the, Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HE DERM AN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 



RAH, RAH, RAH, 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



RAH, RAH, RAH, 
HAH, HAH, HAH. 



Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the “M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 
Call and see our Fountain P?ns, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 



BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street . Jackson, Miss. 




€bc ffurple anD CtHlnte 



€bc purple anD G&bite 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott..... Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore -...Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. Gates Asst. Business Manager 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 

THE SELF-HELP BUREAU. 



Elsewhere in this issue will be 
found an article written by Dr. 
Kern for the Christian Advocate 
in which he reviews the work of 
the self-help bureau of this and 
other colleges. The figures set 
forth by Dr. Kern are surprising. 
They show that during last session 
nearly half of the students of Mill- 
saps made an average of approxi- 
mately one hundred dollars 
($100.00) each. When we con- 
sider that this amount is over one- 
half of the necessary expenses of 
a session, the result is even more 
surprising. We believe that if the 
fact of such possibilities for work- 
ing one’s way through college were 
known throughout the state, there 
would be a great increase in the 
enrollment in the near future. 

The self-help bureau at Millsaps 
differs from those of many other 
institutions in that it is 'under the 
direct management of the Y. M. C. 
A. This organization is behind 
every good movement in college, 
and we do not hesitate to say that 
the self-help department is among 
the ones most worthy to be pushed. 
The authorities of the Y. M. C. A. 
have appointed J. B. Kirkland, 
manager, and Knox Brown, as- 
sistant manager for this year. Stu- 
dents who want work, sign the self- 
help blanks, indicating what work 
is prefered. The managers distrib- 
ute these blanks around town both 
in the business sections and at the 
residences. People wanting work 
done communicate with the mana- 



gers and he assigns somebody to j 
the job. A goodly number of stu- 
dents have already signed up for 
this year and it is expected that a 
good many more will do so. 

The students are not the only 
ones who profit by the efforts of 
the bureau. It has also been of 
great advantage to the business 
men of the city in getting ready 
| service. Nearly every merchant 
needs an extra man on Saturday, 
and having the self-help bureau to 
! draw from, releaves him from the 
necessity of picking up a street 
; loafer. When he has bills to be 
[ collected, he likes to entrust them 1 
! to a young man working his way 
1 through college. The men of the 
| city speak in appreciative terms of 
' the work of the bureau. 

While the bureau has done most 
| valuable work in the past, it is to 
be hoped that it will increase in its 
j efforts in the future. The state is 
filled with young men who are, 
yearning for the possibilities that ; 
an higher education will give them, j 
but who are too poor to go to col- ; 
lege without financial aid. Once 
let these men know that there is 
an organization at Millsaps which 
! proposes to help them through 
school, and they will flock here in 
numbers unheard of before. 

KAPPA SIGMA SMOKER. 
— 

(Intended for Last Issue.) 

On Wednesday evening. Oct. 2. 
the members of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity threw open the doors of 
their spacious colonial home, Gal- 
j lowav Hall, to welcome their 
friends to 'a delightful smoker. Of 
all the enjoyable affairs of the \ 
j year, no other holds quite the ■ 

; place in the hearts of the boys as 
this annual smoker and on Wed- 
; nesday night they found more 
j pleasure awaiting them. While j 
listening to the sweet music of the ' 
orchestra, the young men recalled 
other delightful evenings and re- 
later tales of college pranks and 
summer pleasures. 

The enjoyment of the evening 
was greatly enhanced by the pres- 
ence of a number of the faetultv, ( 
and some of the old Kappa Sig- 
ma ’s who still love the frat and 
enjoy the smokers as much as in 
their college days. The hours 
passed quickly and it was with re- 
gret that the guests bid their hosts 
goodbye after enjoying the charm- , 
ing hospitality which the K. S.’s 
know so well how to extend. 



THE PHI DELTA SMOKER. 

(Intended for Last Issue.) 

The Phi Delta fraternity enter- 
tained their friends on Saturday 
evening. Oct. 6. at one of the most 
enjoyable smokers of the year. 
Their elegant and attractive rooms 
were filled with a jolly crowd of 
boys, who made the hours merry 
with jokes, songs and talks of mar- 
velous adventure. Smoking was 
greatly enjoyed and each guest 
was served with punch and an 
abundance of fruit. Nothing could 
be more delightful than for these 
boys, who see each other every day 
in the class room and on the cam- 
pus. to gather here and in this 
pleasant manner spend such a jol- 
ly evening. 

It was at a late hour that the 
Phi Deltas and their friends said 
good night : each guest declaring 
that this smoker was one of the 
most delightful he had atended. 

GALLOWAYS DECIDE IM- 
PORTANT QUESTION. 

The Galloway Literary Society 
met last Friday night under most 
auspicious and favorable condi- 
tions — all the factionalism and 
strife occasioned by the great po- 
litical battle waged in society hall 
at the previous meeting had died 
down — leaving in its place a unit- 
ed and determined feeling on the 
part of all the members to make 
this the best year of the society. 

After the installation of the of- 
ficers-elect, M. Johnson, the orator 
of the occasion, was called forth 
and in response delivered an ex- 
cellent oration which was enjoy- 
ed by every member of the society. 

The debate was one of special 
interest, not only to the Gallo- 



ways, but to all the students of 
Millsaps as well — touching as it 
does one of the most important dis- 
cussions brought before the stu- 
dent body at the present time. It 
furnished a field i'or many striking 
and effective speeches on each side. 
The question was, “Resolved, that 
Millsaps should abandon football 
and devote her time to other 
sports.” The affirmative was rep- 
! resented by R. W. .Jones and N. 
Harmon, while the negative was 
represented by T. C. Willingham 
and W. D. Barrett. After much 
time spent in earnest consideration 
J and deliberation over the question 
it was decided in favor of the neg- 
ative. “Bigfoot” Jones claims that 
there was bribery connected with 
the decision, but no one has any 
very grave fear of an impeach- 
ment of the judges growing out of 
the charges. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

The recent bereavement of Mr. 
E. S. Brooks, on account of the 
death of his father, brings sadness 
to his many friends. Therefore be 
it 

Resolved, by the Prentiss Liter- 
| ary Society : 

1. That we express our sympa- 
thy to him and the bereaved fain*- 

I ily- 

2. That we pray God may 
i bless them in their bereavement. 

3. That we regret Mr. Brook’s 
absence from our school. 

4. That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be printed in the "Purple and 
White and that a copy be sent to 
the bereaved family. 

C. W. Alford. 

L. H. Gates. 

A. M. Odom, 

Committee. 



YOUR ORDER 

For that Fall and Winter Suit really belongs to 11s 
if you are particular at all about what you get for 
your money. We believe our store should be your 
store, when thinking of ordering a Suit or Overcoat. 
The only inducements we can offer you are de- 
pendable fabrics, honest values, stylish and durable 
tailoring. 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW 

MADE ^11* 1 T* GUARANTEED 
TO YOUR 5* I TO 

MEASURE ^ FIT 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 




Ctic purple anD fflbi te 



o 



PRENTISS SOCIETY. 



Lively Question Debated. 

"(Intended for Last Issue.) 

Prentiss Literary Society met 
Friday night, October 4. The 
house was called to order by Pres- 
ident Golding. After the opening 
prayer, led by Odum, the roll was 
called, and thirty-six members an- 
swered present. 

The names of two new men. Mr. 
Yerger and Mr. Bending, were 
handed in, and they were initiated 
into the Society. 

The literary exercises were un- 
usually good. H. S. Wheeler read 
an instructive essay on the life of 
Abraham Lincoln. W. K. Wil- 
liams. the declaimer for the even- 
ing, proved that he still has some 
of those medal winning qualities 
which were so manifest last -June. 

The question for debate was : 
“Resolved, that foreign immigra- 
tion is detrimental to our nation.” 
Messrs. Odum, Waller and Mussle- 
white discussed the affirmative 
side, and Messrs. Joyce, Barrett 
and Wooten defended the negative. 
The judges decided in favor of the 
negative. 

A committee on resolutions was 
appointed by the president to ex- j 
press the sympathy of the Society j 
to Mr. E. S. Brooks in the loss of j 
his father. 

I. C. Garraway was elected es- 



sayist for one month hence, and 
W. P. Perkins was elected door- 
keeper as successor to Mr. Brooks. 

We were glad to have with us 
Friday night some of our honorary 
members — the coeds. We want 
them to come again for they are 
always welcome. 

PRENTISS LITERARY 
SOCIETY. 

On Friday evening at eight 
o’clock the regular meeting of the 
Prentiss Literary Society was 
called to order by President Gol- 
den. Gregg delivered an excel- 
lent reading upon James A. Gar- 
field. The question for debate was, 
“Resolved, that whiskey is more 
injurious to a nation than war.” 
The speakers who represented the 
affirmative were Whitson, Green 
and Mansell. Those on the nega- 
tive were Davis, Odom and Bar- 
rett. The question was decided in 
favor of the negative. 

Who is Monitor of the Century 
section this year? Let us suggest 
that since this is such a large sec- 
tion. there be two monitors ap- 
pointed and instructed to report 
all absentees to the President. 

ADVERTISE 

in 

€bc purple anD White 

and 

GET RESULTS 







SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SEUTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade .work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

. Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 




You’ll find Walk-Over. Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 




BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

• 415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43,332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 




V 




6 



€fte Purple anD mbi tc 



LOCAL NEWS 



Good cigars are always found 

at Sistrunk’s. Try one. 

« « $ 

Leroy Ratliff and Jack Gaddis 
spent Sunday with homefolks in 

Edwards and Bolton respectively. 

* * * 

C. D. Havens of Lucedale, Miss., 
has recently become a member of 
the law class. 

* * - * 



Bro. G. W. Bachman made the 
student body a much appreciated 
talk at chaped exercises one 

morning last week. 

# * * 

R. C. Edward delivered two 

good sermons at the first Method- 
ist Church of Crystal Springs last 
Sunday. 

* # # 

H. H. Lester returned to school 
last Monday. Lester has been do- 
ing engineering work on the St. 
j Francis levee in Arkansas. 



Judge James Andrew Blount “Dot" Lassiter. “Midget" Cris- 
spent the week-end with “friends” ler, “Strike Out” Brown and 
in Charleston. l“Cuty” Page spent Sunday with 

* * * * friends in Brookhaven. 



Hobbs gives good hair cuts for 
25c. Get him to do your work 
and save money and time. 

# # * 

B. F. Foster spent last week at 
Meridian attending the conference 
of the Southern Christian Church. 

* * * 

R. E. Steen, last year’s editor 
of the Purple and White, was a 
welcome visitor on the campus last 
week. 

* * s 



* * * 

Well ! Well ! ! Boys, the politics 
of the year are over, and even if 
you did not get your man elected, 
let us “bury the hatchet” and get 

down to regular work. 

* * * 

From the large number of play- 
ers that appear on the basketball 
field each evening it looks as if 
Coach Fletcher will have an easy 

task picking a star team. 

* * * 



Messrs. Bailey, Boswell, Scott ^ -Jolh of the Junior Class 

and Wroten were initiated into the re t u rned 1° Us home at Newton 
Sigma Upsilon Literary Fraterni- ' ilsT " ee ^ - J°H> is going to teach 
tv last week. this year, but will return in June 

* *’ * to receive his “dip.” 

# £ £ 

Mr^ Sessions: (Walking in the I 

rear of Miss McGehee on a warm ^ • Montgomery , travel- 

afternoon 1 “Let me carry your j secretary of the \. M. C. A., 
parasol for you Miss McGehee.” j delivered a splendid address on 
Miss McGehee: “No, thanks; 1 1 “Character building” to the stu- 
can carry it all right. -dents Wednesday morning. 




OFFICE 
Showing a 
Tucker 



FRONT 
employees at the 
Jackson. 



* # • 

Dr. Swartz: (In Latin class) 

j “Mr. Weems, which of your paral- 
lel readings has been the greatest 
benefit to you?” 

Mr. Weems: “My pony, ‘Fes- 
sor. ’ ’ 

* « • 

; How does Coach Fletcher for 
basketball and track and Coach 
I Peaster for baseball sound to you. 
.It listens well doesn't it? Well 
I then come out and give them 
! something to do. 

* * * 

Mr. Bingham: (In Freshman 

English), “Dr. Kern, will we have 
1 to write a composition every i 

week?” 

Dr. Kern: “Yes, everv Tues- 
day.” 

Mr. Bingham: “I hope Thans- 
giving will come on Tuesday this 
year.” 



FOR - THE - YOUNG - MAN 



“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



The Great Southern Hotel 

Gulfport, Mississippi. 



THE MOST PALATITL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



Golf Bathing 

Tennis EUROPEAN Hunting 

Fishing PLAN 250 Rooms 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, - Manager 



College Boys! 

Trade with and meet your friends at onr store. We want you 
to feel at home in our place of business. 

We want your drug business. Remember! “The Old Reliable 
Drug Store” is The Best in the city. Prescription work our specialty, 
all prescriptions being filled by a graduate and registered druggist. 
We send for and deliver your prescriptions to the campus. 

The most complete stock in Jackson of STATIONERY, CANDIES, 
CIGARS, best, good and better. FOUNTAIN PENS, the perfect ones. 
BRUSHES of all kinds, TOILET ARTICLES, RUBBER GOODS; in 
fact, everything to be found in an up-to-date Drug Store. 

Remember the place. All cars lead to our door. 

We deliver quick. Try us. Phones 109 and 1499. 

Hunter & McGee 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Your SMOKERS and RECEPTIONS will not be complete unless 
you will let 

MANGUM 

serve you. He knows how and will do it reasonably. He also carries 
the best line of 

FANCY CANDY 

to be found in the City of Jackson. The best that’s made. When 
down town don't forget to drink at his Soda Fountain where only the 
best of everything is served College Men. 

Headquarters for Millsaps Collegians. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




€be purple anD &3frite 



1 



Boys, have your Tailoring done 
at T. B. Doxev’s, and save the 
special discount which he gives to 

College boys. 3t 

* # * 

Frazier: (To Prep), “Say fel- 
low, you should be like me, have a 
clear record in love affairs.” 

Prep : “Yes, I could have a clear 
record too. if it was a blank one 
like yours. ’ ’ 

* * * 



New Student: (Passing chapel 

Friday afternoon) “What is all 
that noise in chapel, sounds like 
the Republican convention?” 

Old Student : No. no, only the 
Freshmen electing class officers. 

# * # 



Barrett has recently received a 
discipline to Cicero from Hinds 
and Noble : ‘ ‘ Acquaint now thy- 
self with the truths contained 
therein dear brother that your 
knowledge may be strong in 
.June.” 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 



KODAK 



Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



Patterson: (Discussing the dif- 

ferent sections of the State of Mis- 
sissipi) “O, there is no section of 
the state any good except the part 
I came from.” 

Willingham: “Surely, then you 
are not a fair sample of its pro- 
ducts.” 



PREP LOCALS. 

The entire student body of the 
Millsaps Preparatory School, ex- 
tends its deepest sympathy to E. 

1 S. Brooks, on account of the re- 
cent deatli of his father. 

Mr. I. D. Hicks, a former stu- 
dent of the Prep School, made us 
a short visit Sunday. He was en- 
route to Atlanta. Ga., where he is 
to enter the Southern School of 
Pharmacy. 

The Prep football team is pro- 
gressing rapidly. The outlook is 
exceedingly cheerful and we are 
expecting a winning team. 

Pride goeth before destruction. 
Watch out. or the Prep’s weight 
may destroy some of the college 
brains. 

Freshman to Prep : ‘ ‘ Say. Sport, 
which are you trying for on the 
team, right or left formation?” 

Someone wanted to know why 
the college refused to scrimmage 
the Preps. Perhaps they . used 
some of their superfluous brains. 




C 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN 
Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath. One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupv 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



| SOPHOMORES ELECT OFFI- 
CERS. 

Following in the footsteps of 
j the Seniors ond Juniors the mem- 
! hers of the Sophomore class got 
together last week and with some 
I politics all their own managed to 
pull off the annual election of class 
officers. Be it said to their credit 
that they had profited somewhat 
by the experiences of the past year 
and pulled through the affair with- 
out any very serious hitches or 
hinderaiyes of any kind. 

The officers selected are as fol- 
lows : 

R. H. Harmon, president. 

K. M Broom, vice president 

C. Bullock secretary, 

G. W. Harrison, treasurer. 

Miss Green, historian. 

J. W. Chisolm, liar. 

J. Gaddis, sport. 

J. Coudrey. honor council. 

LAMARS DISCUSS HAGUE. 

The enthusiastic members of the 
Lamar Society held a splendid 
meeting last Friday night in the 
Society Hall. The meeting was 
marked by good attention, elo- 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course , 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING CjOMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned. Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $100. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



GALLE TAILORING CO. 

417'/2 E. Capitol Street 

We do all kinds of Altering, Repairing, Cleaning 
and Pressing at Reasonable Prices. 

• OLD PHONE 618 



ATTEND THE BEST 

HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The Only Business University in the South 

We have no branch schools and devote our 
ENTIRE time to ONE INSTITUTION which • 
POSITIVELY enables us to give our students 
the CREAM of Business Training. 



We' are as good as the best, 

And are better than all the rest. 



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Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



S. P. McRAE 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 
Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard 
& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle 
Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 

214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 




Arrow 

Notch COLLARS 

THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2H to. BELMONT 2 H In. 
MEDORA VA In. CHESTER 2 In. 



DRINK CARBONATED 




IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 

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JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



quent orations, logical arguments, 
and prophetic visions. Some of 
the best speakers of the society 
spoke and the one prophet of the 
society prophesied. Altogether the 
meeting was one of much profit to 
the speakers and of much pleasure 
to the listeners. 

The declaimer of the evening, 
Case, spoke very eloquently on the 
lives of great men in general and 
of Lafayette in particular. At 
times the eloquence of Case was 
so great that the imaginative lis- 
tener could see the great French 
patriot as he stood at the head of 
the American army with his pow- 
dered locks waving before the 
wind. Case is no stranger to the 
Lamars as he was one of the most 
loyal members of last year. 

Next came the orator, James 
McClure. The very name is elo- 
quent. This young man. with his 
graceful bearing and his slow and 
forceful delivery made a lasting 
[ impression on every member of the I 
I society, and his terse, short, em- 
phatic sentences, replete with prac- j 
i tical thoughts and common sense. 

| burned themselves into the minds 
j of the listeners. McClure is one of 
j our new men and bids fair to make 
himself an influence felt in the so- 
j ciety before the session closes. 

After the orations came the reg- 
ular order of debate. The ques- j 
tion, “Resolved, that the Hague 
has failed to cope successfully with [ 
the peace problem. ’ ’ was argued 
ably by Weems, Hillman and Mc- 
Gee for the affirmative, and Harri- 
! son for the negative. The decision 
was rendered by the judges in fa- 
! vor of the affirmative. ,Well de- 
served mention might be made of 
j all the debators, but especial men- 
tion should be made of Mr. Hill- 
; man, a new membe.* of the 
Law Class. He handled his sub- 
! .ject as only the great lawyer 
that he is destined to make might 
handle his case. We wall always 
be glad to hear Hillman at any 
time on any subject. 

Mention should be made here of 
McGee, our old stand-by, aud 
our only prophet. His knowledge 
of geology and astronomy is such 
that his prophecies equal and pos- 
sibly excel those of Elisha and 
Elijah. Lack of space forbids us 
to mention his prophetic utteran- i 
ces, but suffice it to say, that 
everybody might well watch the 
programs for the appearance of 
Mr. McGee’s name and come out to 
hear him 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. I. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 

$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$1.50, $1.75, $2 
TRY THEM 



Z. D. Davis, President 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CD. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 







QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 




Vol. V. 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1912 


No. 4. 



FOOTBALL. 



Fresh-Sophs Downed Preps, Score 
20-0 — Gaddis and Cassibry Star 
in Snappy Game — Gates and 
Holder Play Well for Preps. 
The first game of football was 
played last Thursday between the 
Freshmen-Sophomores and Prep 
teams. Both teams were in good 
form and although the game was 
rather one-sided, it was very inter- 
esting. The Preps were confident 
of victory because they have much 
the heavier team, and have been 
practicing for a longer period. 

The Freshmen-Sophomores how- 
ever, were not afraid in the least 
and when the game was called it 
took them just four minutes to 
make the first touch down. After 
the first half the Preps became 
aware of the fact that weight is not 
what counts in football. 

The score after the first half 
was 20 to 0, and although the 
Freshmen-Sophomores could have 
scored in the last part of the game 
the feeling they have for the 
Preps kept them from doing so. 
The detail of the game is as fol- 
lows : 

The Fresh-Soph kick off and 
Golden returns the hall two yards ; 
the Preps then fail to make the 
distance and the ball goes over. 
McLain gains six yards ; Hathorn 
goes around the end for twenty 
yards ; Cassibry sweeps around 
left end for touch down. The 
Fresh-Sophs kick off and the ball 
is returned five yards. Then there 
was playing pro and con and when 
the first quarter was over the ball 
was on the 20 yd. line in Fresh- 
Soph possession. Second quarter, 
Cassibry fifteen yards ; Gaddis 
then goes through the line for a 
touch down; kicks goal. Preps 
kick off and Hilzem returns eight 
yards. Gaddis then goes around 
the end for eight yards. Gaddis 
goes through the line for two 
yards. Holder recovers forward 
pass and runs fifteen yards. Wilber 
gains three yards. Gates ploughs 
through line for nine yards. Hol- 
(Conrinuad on Page 3) 



I Annual Boom Inaugurated j 

Senior Class Assumes Responsibility and Elects Compe- 
tent Staff — Scott, Editor — Weems, Chairman of 
Business Corps — Work Will Begin at 
Once and Annual Will Come 
Out Early. 

The knockers will please put up their hammers, the pessimists 
kindly pessimate no more, let the kill-joys order a quart, the Class of 
j ’13 will uphold its record as a class which does things. It has as- 
sumed the responsibility of an Annual, therefore a successful produc- 
tion is assured. 

The committee appointed by President Lampton to confer with 
Dr. Kern in regard to an annual met with him on last Thursday and 
after due consideration the following staff was nominated. At a meet- 
. ing of the Class on Friday it was elected in toto : 

F. T. Scott, Editor-in-Chief. 

G. H. Moore, Literary Editor. 

Miss Hortense Smith, Art Editor. 

J. A. Blount, Law Editor. 

J. D. Wroten, Club Editor. 

S. L. Crockett, Statistic Editor. 

J. W. Weems, S. B. Lampton, F. H. McGee, Business Managers. 

“Red” Golden, Prep Editor. 

Joe Spinks, Prep. Business Manager. 

It can be said without fear of contradiction that a better man 
than Frank Scott could not have been selected, to head the staff. Since 
the time of his entrance as a Prep he has been known as a man who 
does things, a willing and competent worker. Scott is very fortunate 
in having associated' with him as literary editor and associate editor, 
| George Moore — Moore is considered one of the hrainest and best read 
men who ever attended Millsaps and will add much to the excellence 
of the forthcoming annual. As every one knows, nothing adds so 
much to a publication as good illustrations, and if Miss Smith is not an 
artist of renown herself, her personality and winning ways are suffi- 
cient to make any artist work his fingers off for the good of her depart- 
ment. 

Blount is an old head, and capable, as is shown by his work 
on many previous annuals. 

Dorsey Wroten, a “joiner” himself, is equal to the task of por- 
traying Club Life in Millsaps. 

That Crockett is worthy is evident from the fact that, an under 
class man, he is given a place among the gods. 

So far as getting out the Bobashela is concerned, no one has so 
much responsibility as the business managers. This year this import- 
ant position has been given to a board of three, with J. T. Weems as 
Chairman, assisted by Lampton and McGee. These men will divide 
the work between them and each has the privilege of selecting an as- 
sistant. The annual will be out by May 1. 

These men will get out a good annual, but they must have your 
support, especially financial. Will you do your part? 



Y. M. C. A. 



Prof. Lin Discusses the Character 
of Daniel. 



An Interesting Session Attended 
by Large Audience. 

On last Friday night the Asso- 
ciation was much gratified at hav- 
ing Professor Lin as the speaker 
for the evening. It was his first 
time to appear before the Y. M. C. 
A., not having been here before 
this year, but already he has ac- 
quired a reputation for admirable 
character, forceful speaking, and a 
thorough knowledge of the Bible. 
Therefore quite a large number of 
students, faculty members, and vis- 
itors were collected in the Y. M. 
C. hall to hear Professor Lin. 

He began by calling attention to 
the very evident fact that in 
church attendance there is always 
a majority of women. Passing by 
some reasons assigned as the cause 
of this, the speaker said that there 
: was one thing which he considered 
as the primary cause of the pre- 
I dominance of women in religion, 
: namely, that the feminine virtues 
of religion had been stressed too 
much, that attention was not call- 
ed to the fact that Christ had been 
the strength of ages and dominat- 
ed and shaped the lives of men 
whom we have considered the 
strongest of the strong. We have 
looked upon Christ as the Lily of 
the Valley and have forgotten that 
he was also the Lion of the tribe 
of Judah. The religion of such a 
man can be none other than a 
man’s religion. 

In coming to the special man 
under discussion, Professor Lin 
stated that Daniel was a man to 
be admired for the combination of 
strength, purity, and gentleness, 
that went to make up his life. 
Briefly, but with force and empha- 
sis on significant facts, the speaker 
discussed the successive events in 
the life of Daniel from the time 
when as a boy he was taken as a 
captive to the great City of Baby- 
lon. There he entered into the life 
(Continued on Page 2) 



2 



€t)c purple anO Wfoxti 




COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr.-*. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr.-M. W: Swartz .r.:.-...-.:. . Treasurer 
FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis .—. .Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

.. . Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton ......Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds„ Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble....... Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott .Vice President 

R. E. Selby...... Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott ;. President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery... President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. Carraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain ... Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 



C. H. Blewett...r. Mid-Session Orator 

' Olin Ray 

R. I. Jolly 

.....Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

.1. D. ^Vroten Anniversarian 

1 S. L. Crockett .. ...Anniversary Orator 
W. E. Morse.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
1 R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

„ Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

L. H. Gates Football Manager | 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager ; 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 



Y. M. C. A. 

(Continued from Page 11 
of the court at one of the most lux- 
urious and splendid capitals of the 
ancient world. In the same way 
! and yet to a much greater extent, 
Daniel was confronted by the same 
problem that comes to the school- 
boy when he enters college : the 
temptation to waste his time in 
frivolty and idleness and change 
the words learned in a Christian 
\ home for those of a more thought- 
| less world about him. But Daniel 
had purposed in his heart that 
these things should not change the 
course of his life. The speaker 
laid special emphasis on this fact 
that it was no accident in the case 
1 of Daniel but that behind his 
! great achievements there was a 
firm and steadfast purpose, the ne- 
cessary foundation for a successful 
life. 

The course of Daniel’s life was 
followed up through the days 
when he became one of the first 
men of the nation. Daniel won 
his way into the hearts of the peo- 
ple by his gentle and lovable qual- 
ities. A man need not he weak to 
be a gentleman. No character in 



T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil ..Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck _ Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems. 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell -Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott -Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems-Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 



ancient history was stronger than 
that of Daniel and yet no one was 
loved better by his people. The 
king showed his love by being un - 1 
able to sleep on the night that Dan- 
iel spent in the lions’ den. 

The great qualities of Daniel 
which ought to be admired and fol- 
| lowed by the young men of today 
are his moral purpose, his mental 
strength and diligence in the work 
laid out for him to do. The life of j 
Daniel was a well rounded life, a j 
life so perfectly balanced in its 
mental, moral, and physical as - 1 



pects that nothing could shake its 
purpose, its course, or its final des- 
tiny. 

Altogether it was a strong and 
pleasing presentation of a good 
subject. The students were much 
pleased by Professor Lin’s style 
and hope to have him speak to us 
again. 

At the conclusion of the address. 
Mr. Weems presented the subject 
of Bible study as a part of the As- 
sociation work. 




'OCI-ETV 
J>ZATS & 
EMBLEMS 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 



of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 



PREP LOCALS. 



Bro. Savage in Caesar Class : | 
“Let’s have better order in class. 
If you expect me to treat you as 
ladies and gentlemen, you must 
treat me the same way. ’ ’ 



The nerve of some people ! A 
Freshman actually approached a 
Prep and proposed that they go to 
town together. Some one should 
take it upon themselves to inform 
the sadly neglected individuals in 
regard to the pride and dignity of 
His Highness, the Prep. 



We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



Of course we had to suffer de- 1 



feat in order to encourage the var- 
sity to further activity. — The Prep 
football team. 



Watch out fellows, the old story 
of “I have a relative in town,” is 
getting weak in the eyes of the 
faculty. 



The fair is at hand. Of course 
we shall all attend and let people 
know that we are Preps. • 



Rensselaer 

Polytechnic 

Engineering Inctihlfp 

and Science UlMIlUlC 

Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. E.). Electrical Engineering (E. Lj, and 
General Science <B. S.). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical. Electrical. Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to FYansioli’s Rookery ) 




Che purple anD QHfrit c 



3 



FOOTBALL. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

der goes around right end for 
three. Gates hits through line for 
two yards. Holder gains five 
yards. Gaddis recovers F. P., and 
goes for a touch down. Kicks goal. 
First half ends score 20 to 0. 

Second half McLain kicks off. 
Golden returns twenty yards. 
Gates two yards. Golden one 
yard. Holder runs and loses ball. 
Fresh-Soph lose ball on the first 
play. Gates through line four 
yards. Preps penalized fifteen 
yards for pushing. Holder makes 
four yards and loses ball. Cassibry j 
passes ball to Watkins who makes J 
twenty yards. Cassibry no gain. 
Incomplete F. P. Gaddis kicks and j 
Holder returns hall seven yards. 
Gates four yards. Golden no gain. 
Gates six yards through line. Hoi- ! 
der around end for six yards. 



Gates through line for four yards. 
Holder kicks to Cassibry who re- 
turns the ball to the middle of the 
field. Third quarter up ball in 
Fresh-Soph possession. 

Incomplete F. P. Cassibry 
around end six yards. Gaddis 
through line six yards. Incomplete 
F. P. F. P. to Watkins for nine 
yards. Gaddis around end eight 
yards. Cassibry around left end 
seven yards. Gaddis through line j 
for nine yards. Cassibry around 
end for nine yards. P. C. and J. j 
N. McNeil were then put in the j 
game. Gaddis, no gain. Gaddis 
around end six yards. Mclain 
loses six yards. The Preps get the 
ball on a fumble. Gates fails to 
gain. Gates through line for 
twelve yards. Holder kicks and 
Gaddis returns the ball ten yards. 
Time up, ball in the middle of the 
field in Fresh-Soph possession. 
Score 20 to 0. 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J/2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



DR. G. M. GALLOWAY 



DENTIST 



V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss'. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

; 202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 



Office over Kress. 




Cumb. Phone 2013. 



Room 1. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 



DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 

ADVERTISE 

in 

Cbc purple anD Z&bitz 
• and 
GET RESULTS 

OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

I Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 
HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

HALL DRUG COMPANY 
Jackson, Miss. 

LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the Jackson 
Steam Laundry 
and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Olin Ray: (Shaking Wroten vig- 
J orously to wake him) “Say fellow, 
j are you asleep ? ’ ’ 

Wroten: “Why do you ask?” 
Ray: “I want to borrow a dol- 
lar.” 

Wroten: “Yes, I am sound ( 

J asleep.” 

Dr. Swartz: (Lecturing to Jun- 
ior class) “Cato was, if you please, ; 
a narrow-minded, bigoted old fel- 
low. He despised Greek.” 



RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE HAH, HAH, HAH. 

Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the "M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 
Call and see our Fountain Pens, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 



B O N-T O N CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 




4 



Cftc Purple anD mWt 



Ci)c Purple anD mWt 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. Gates Asst. Business Manager 



signified his intention of getting 
the Ann up) out sooner than it has 
ever been done before — that is not 
later than May 1. In order for 
him to do this you must have your 
picture made on time, pay your 
levies promptly, subscribe for an 
Annual and help the staff in every 
possihle manner. 



EXIT FAIR ; ENTER GRIND. 



resolve that the ill effects shall not 
be permanent. Let him resolve to 
profit by his experience and be 
able to tell his new college friend 
of next session to beware. Above 
all. fellows, let the exit of the fair 
be the signal to get down to work. 

CORRUPT POLITICS IN 
MILLSAPS. 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 

THE ’13 BOBASHELA. 



No one who is at all familiar 
with the work which has been ac- 
complished on the annual during 
the past week has any hesitancy in 
predicting for Millsaps the most 
successful annual in her history — 
hoth from a financial and a liter- 
ary standpoint. The business like 
manner in which the Senior Class 
has conducted the preliminary ar- 
rangements. the excellent staff 
which has been selected, the finan- 
cial support which has been as- 
sured and the hearty co-operation 
which is being tendered it on 
every hand — all go to make up 
what are considered the most, fa- 
vorable auspices under which the 
Bobashela Boom has ever been 
launched and portend for Chief 
Scott and his associates the pro- 
duction of an annual of unexcelled 
merit and worth. 

An annual is a thing in which a , 
school may justly take pride, for 
it is a reflection, as it were, of the 
year’s work and happenings — a 
thing by which others may come 
to know something of the pleasures 
and doings of the inner collegiate 
circle — a thing that will in after 
years enable the student to call 
hack the sweet memories, associa- 
tions and friendships of a happy 
college career. It is encumbered 
upon every man then, in order that 
he may be a part of this important 
college publication that he do his 
pprt in aiding the staff in getting 
together the material for the An- 
nual. The business manager has 



Well, the fair with all its dis- 
tractions. with all its fascinations. 
! is over. We have all been down 
and have had a good time. We 
i have taken in everything from the 
j farm exhibit to the various attrac- 
tions on the pike. We have list- 
ened to the speal of the fakir as he 
appealed to our credulity, and, in 
many instances, have proved gulli- 
ble. We have gone down with our 
pockets jingling with silvery coins 
and returned despondently rat- 
tling our keys. We have been 
down sometimes perhaps, when we 
ought not to have gone, when we 
| used a great deal of our time 
watching out for the Profs. But. 
taking it all in all, we have had a 
good time. We all have our re- 
grets, but we also have our happy ! 
recollections. 

It is, however, over now, fellows, 
and with it we should let go every- 
thing that has stood between us 1 
and our school duties. We should j 
get down to earnest, conscientious j 
work. Between now and the j 
Christmas holidays there are eight 
weeks. In these eight weeks, the ! 
best work of the session can be 
| done. There will be nothing to 
disturb us. During this time we 
ought to review our back work so 
thoroughly and get up our present 
| recitations so well that we will 
j store our minds with a bulwark of 
j knowledge that no set of examina- 
j tion questions will be able to over- 
' come. We owe this duty to our- 
selves, to our college, and to our 
parents. 

The effect of the fair on the 
student body and especially on the 
new boys is always a matter of 
great concern to the faculty and to 
others who are interested. There 
are so many distractions, so many 
things connected and associated j 
with it that are misleading in their 
tendency that it is easy for a boy ! 
to get started wrong during the 
week that it is in progress. If 
there is one among us who feels | 
that he has strayed from the right 
path during this week, let him i 



Woman’s Suffrage Plays Promi- 
nent Part. 

Any one on the campus last 
Wednesday afternoon would have 
thought that the Bull Moose were 
in convention. The howls of the 
Western cowboy intermingled with 
J screaches and squeals of the lady 
suffragettes permeated the most 
' remote parts of the campus. Officer 
: Hitch peacefully sleeping in rear 
of Brown’s Livery stable was 
awakened by the uproar and after 
sending in a hurry call for a 
double force of reserves hastened . 
towards the seat of combat to quell 
the riot. But on his arrival he j 
found that the Freshmen hadj 
merely gone into executive session 
for the purpose of electing of- 
ficers. Hon. W. E. Hobbs called 
the meeting to order and was elect- 
ed temporary chairman. Messrs. 
Carraway, Duncan and Hendricks 
were then placed in nomination for 
president. At the end of the first 
ballot the count stood: 

Number present 36 ; number 
votes cast 56. Carraway, 32 ; Hen- 
dricks. 12; Duncan. 12. Hon. T. 
Roos. Carraway was declared elect- j 
ed. • 

At the close of the election of 
vice-president it was evident the 
suffragettes held the upper hand 
and that no one but those of pul- 



chretidinous superiority would be 
selected. Mr. J. N. McNeil was 
chosen vice president overwhelm- 
ingly. The majority party then 
decided that the Divine Right of 
Woman should be upheld, conse- 
quently the following Co-suffra- 
gettes were elected : 

Miss Buck, secretary. 

Miss Ella K. Steen, historian. 

Miss Shurlds. poet. 

Having in mind the Biblical 
statement that “All Men Are 
Liars,” it was with some difficulty 
that the High Exalted Grandfath- 
er of Jhis mighty order was select- 
ed. but after due consideration T. 
M. Rubble. Esq., was unanimously 
< chosen. 

Mr. Barrett was elected Honor 
Councilman over Mr. Jamie 
Thompson by a vote of 48 to 43. 

The complete list is: 

L. T. Carraway, President. 

J. N. McNeil, Vice President. 

Miss Buck, Secretary. 

Miss Ella K. Stean, Historian. 

Miss Shurlds. Poet. 

Air. Rubble, Liar. 

W. D. Barrett. Honor Council- 
man. 

Co-ed to Backstrum: “You are 
pretty much of a celebrity.” 

Backstrum (elated) “A what?” 

Co-ed (frantically endeavoring 
to explain) “O. something like a 
wild animal.” 



Dr. Watkins: (In Psychology 

class) “Air. Morse, what is tim- 
bre?” 

Air. Alorse: (very knowingly) 

‘ ‘ Lumber, Doctor. ’ ’ 

Dr. Watkins: “I mean timbre 
from a psychological standpoint.” 
Mr. Alorse: “The material then 
from which psychology is made.” 



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Every garment will be strictly hand tailored to 
your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 

Best Fit ©1 K Best Assortment 
Best Values J- O Best Service 

Olliers at $16.50, SI8, S20, $22.50, & $25 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 




Cfrc purple anD Wbitt 



o 




The question tor debate was 
‘ ‘ Resolved, the Negro Should Have 
a College Eedueation.” The first 
speaker on the affirmative was 
Blewett. He handled the subject 



was ably represented by Messrs. 
Bullock, Crocket and Keister while 
the negative was equally as well 
represented by Messrs. J. B. Cain, 



BOYS: Lome and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



to the State of Mississippi, and 
which is now so prominent before 
the public, was decided in favor of 
the affirmative. 

A committee was appointed to 
confer with the Lamar Society rel- 



half of the negro. Selby came 
next for the negative and in his 
customary way put the enemy to 
flight. Next came W. W. Hillman, 
who spoke in a very forceful man- 
ner. Following Hillman. Boswell 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

41d East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43,332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander. W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders. S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



Literary Societies 

LAMAR LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Enthusiastic Meeting — Patterson 
Declaims and Hillman De- 
livers Oration. 

A lively interest is being taken 
this year by the Lamars in society 
work. This is evident by the rec- 
ord of last Friday night. Every 
man on the program was present. 
Several new men were on the pro- 
gram and they made an excellent 
showing. The deelaimer of the 
evening, Patterson, made an excel- 
lent speech. He is a man who will 
make a good record on the plat- 
form and who will bring honors to 
the society. After the deelaimer, 
the orator, E. L. Hillman, in a 
pleasant and forceful style, deliv- 
ered an excellent oration. 



i spoke in behalf of the negative. He 
handled the subject in a logical 
and matter of fact way and greatly 
aided his side. Kirkland next 
spoke for the affirmative and ac- 
; quitted himself well. The last 
i speaker. Gathings. was at his best 
and gave a good speech which de- 
termined the final decision in favor 
of the negative. 



GALLOWAY SOCIETY. 

Declare that Governor Shall Not 
Have Pardoning Power. 

The regular meeting of the Gal- 
| loway Literary Society took place 
| Friday evening in the society’s | 
; hall. An unusually lively and in- j 
teresting debate was on the pro- 
gram for the evening. The ques- 
tion was ‘ ‘ Resolved, That the Gov- 
ernor Should Not Have the Par- 

j : ff rru „ 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to * wear at 



in his usual masterly way, making 

<1 n 4 "nnvt/v + n-rvrvnnl it* V>n 



Liauaeraaie ana iteagan. me 
mipstion. which is of vital interest 



jy JACKSON'S BEST STORE. 

Kenn/ngtons 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SE UTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 





6 



£t)c purple anD CTitc 



* 



ative to getting a debate with the ( < 

Univ ersity of Mississippi. ; J^ aW O e p ar tment j 

PRENTISS SOCIETY. 



Preps Decided in Favor of Com- 
pulsory Education. 

Friday, Oct. 18, the house was 
called to order by the President, 
and led in prayer by the Chaplain. 
After the roll call, three new mem- 
bers, Messrs. Holder, Yentress, and 
McGehee, were initiated into the 
Society. 

The literary exercises were then 
taken up. The essayist being ab- 
sent, the declaimer, “Red” Gold- 
ing, was the first speaker. He de- 
livered an excellent oration. 

The question for the evening : 
“Resolved, that the United States 
Should Adopt Compulsory Educa- 
tion,” was well debated. The af- 
firmative was upheld by Messrs. 
Johnson, Alford and Holmes, 
while on the negative side were 
Bending, Waller and Perkins. The 
judges rendered their decision in 
favor of the affirmative. Scott 
from the Lamars was then given 
the floor and after a few words of 
encouragement to the members, 
stated the main reason of his visit. 

The Bobashela Staff Committee, 
had decided, he said, to have two 
representatives from the Prep de- 
partment, an editor and a business 
manager, as these officers were to 
come from the Society, the house 
was then opened for nominations. 
Golding was elected without oppo- 
sition as editor. But there seemed 
to be different ideas as to who 
should be business manager. B. B. 
Gates and Joe Spinks were nomi- 
nated, and when the count was 
taken, Spinks was declared elect- 
ed. 

There being no further business 
to come before the Society it was 
adjourned. 



At the last meeting of the High 
Moot Court, the case of J. P. 
Waugh vs. the P. & Q. R. R. Co., 
came up for consideration and 
after a wonderful battle between 
opposing counsel the ease was sub- 
mitted to the jury. A verdict was 
rendered in behalf of the plaintiff 
and $75,000 fixed as the amount of 
damages. 

Judge Fulton Thompson presid- 
ed as special Judge. His decisions 
were noteworthy because of their 
lucidity and power. Judge Thomp- 
son will no doubt at some future 
date wear the Ermine of this eoun- 1 
try’s Highest Court. 

The counsel for both sides of the 
case were all particular stars. As 
they thundered the canons of law 
at the court and jury, men marvel- 
ed. Very brilliant indeed was the; 
address of Attorney Sharborough. 
This eloquent address was, in full, 
as follows : Gentlemen of the jury, 
you have as much sense as these | 
here lawyers and I thank you for 
your close attention.” With an 
expansive Hooliganesque bow he 
submitted the case. 

The address of each lawyer in 
the case was good but any report 
of the case without mention of E. 
H. Green’s plaintive cry for Rod- 
erick, would be hopelessly incom- 
plete. 

The case of J. M. Talbert vs. 
Mack George for libellous state- 
ments as to his character was 
thrown out of court because of a 
lack of consideration. 

James A. Blount, who stands as \ 
a sort of Fiduciary of Cupid, visit- 
ed Charleston the first of the week. 
Ostensibly business was the reason 
for his visit but really, it was to 
see “Miss Freckles.” 




JOB PRESS ROOM 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing the long line 
of Job Presses kept continually busy on good printing. 



FOR • THE ■ YOUNG - MAN 

“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



The Great Southern Hotel 

Gulfport, Mississippi. 



THE MOST PALATITL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



Golf Bathing 

Tennis EUROPEAN Hunting 

Fishing PLAN 250 Rooms 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, ... . Manager 



College Boys! 

Trade with and meet your friends at our store. We want you 
to feel at home in our place of business. 

We want your drug business. Remember! “The Old Reliable 
Drug Store” is The Best in the city. Prescription work our specialty, 
all prescriptions being filled by a graduate and registered druggist. 
We send for and deliver your prescriptions to the campus. 

The most complete stock in Jackson of STATIONERY, CANDIES, 
CIGARS, best, good and better. FOUNTAIN PENS, the perfect ones. 
BRUSHES of all kinds, TOILET ARTICLES, RUBBER GOODS; in 
fact, everything to be found in an up-to-date Drug Store. 

Remember the place. All cars lead to our door. 

We deliver quick. Try us. Phones 109 and 1499. 

Hunter & McGee 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Your SMOKERS and RECEPTIONS will not be complete unless 
you will let 

MANGUM 

serve you. He knows how and will do it reasonably. He also carries 
the best line of 

FANCY CANDY 

to be found in the City of Jackson. The best that’s made. When 
down town don’t forget to drink at his Soda Fountain where only the 
best of everything is served College Men. 

Headquarters for Millsaps Collegians. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




€t)c Purple ano Wite 



LOCAL NEWS 



Late rivals of the “Gold Dust 
Twins ’’-^-McNeely Brothers. 



“Jerry” Montgomery spent last 
week in Memphis on professional 
business. 



The Junior Co-eds want to know 
if they can get a monopoly on 
hearts. 



Luke Neil, of the Class of ’09 
spent several days with Frat mates 
last week. 



-Dr. Hutton, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church, made us a 
splendid talk on “College Hon- 
esty,” last Thursday morning at 
chapel. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show VOll 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



Will someone kindly give Weems 
and Savage some lessons in closing 
transoms. 

# * * 

J. L. Heflin, a member of last 
year’s Freshman Class, was on the- 

‘ 

campus last Tuesday. 

# * # 

E. J. Davis, a one time student 
of Millsaps. spent several days in 
the city during the fair. 

* # * 

Hurrah! for the fair. Go down 

tomorrow and try your skill 
knocking down the negro babies. 

* * * 

| Rev. W. M. Williams of the j 
Orphanage, conducted our chapel 
i exercises last Tuesday morning. 

* * # 

Miss McGehee: (To Harmon) 

! ‘ ‘ How goes the world ? ’ ’ 

Harmon: “All right, I guess, 
she is still turning around. ’ ’ j 

* * * ! 

Reid Gee visited friends on the j 

campus last Saturday and Sunday, j 
Gee says he expects to return to 
Millsaps next year. 

t * « 

Raymond Applewhite, a snort- 
' ing Freshman of last year’s class, ! 
was a pleasant visitor on the cam- 1 
pus last week. j r 

* * • 

Freshmen Co-eds (after knock- 
ing half an hour at entrance of 
Science Hall) “Is this Mr. Kern’s 
room ? ’ ’ 

* # # 

Robt. Harmon says that all the 
Co-eds have the funniest noses this 
year. We wonder if they have all 
told him no, already. - 



Mr. Blewette: (after roll call in 
I Latin class) “Dr. Swartz, did you| 
call my name before I came in ? ” 

Dr. Swartz: “Yes, as I usually 
Ido.” 

« • • 

Miss Stein: (Translating Latin) 
j “Pliny’s wife wanted him to write 
to her twice a day.” 

Dr. Swartz: “Miss Stein that’s 
{going some, isn’t it?” 

* * * 

Tommy Lewis, of the Senior 
Class of ’ll and law class cf T2 
spent Saturday and Sunday with 
Frat mates and friends here, 
i Tommy was enroute to Oklahoma 
where he has formed a partnership 
with his uncle in the law practice. 

# * * 

W. M. Colmer. of last year’s j 

| Sophomore Class, spent the week’s 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Panching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 



Phones 415. 



GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed In the Latest 
Styles. Felt , Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



GALLE TAILORING CO. 

417*4 E. Capitol Street 

We do all kinds of Altering, Repairing, Cleaning 
and Pressing at Reasonable Prices. 

OLD PHONE 618 



ATTEND THE BEST 



HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The Only Business University in the South 

We have no branch schools and devote our 
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the CREAM of Business Training. 



We are as good as the best. 

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8 



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Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



S. P. McRAE 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 
Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard 
& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle 
Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 

214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 



end on the campus, visiting friends 
and fraternity mates. “Bill” is 
conducting a “young university” 
at D’Lo, Miss., and many good re- 
ports have reached us from that 
place. 

* • • 

Prep : ( To Miss Lowther over 
telephone) “I simply adore you.” 

Miss Lowther: “What did you 
say ? ’ ’ 

Prep: “I adore you.” 

Miss Lowther: “Who did you 

say you adored?” 

* • • 

Dr. Swartz: (In Latin class) 
“Mr. Clark, when do you use the 
word Ama (Love Thou)?” 

Mr. Clark: “Only on extra or- 
dinary occasions, Doctor.” 

• • • 

H. H. Boswell addressed the 
high school one day last week on 
Athletics. Bos has made athletics 
his hobby and no one doubts but 

that he did justice to the subject. 

• • • 

We regret very much to lose two 
of our old ‘ ‘ stand-bys, ’ ’ in the per- 
sonages of Fred Jones and Billie | 
Duncan. They left Thursday for 
the University of Mississippi and 
S. P. U., respectively, where they 
will enter school. 

* # * 

“Skylight Jack,” alias D. J. J 
Savage, gives free lessons in wall I 
| climbing. Members of the Junior j 
* English class had the pleasure of 
seeing one of his demonstrations 
j Tuesday morning. 




— MEETING OF PREACHERS 
LEAGUE. 



Arrow 

T^otch COLLARS 

THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2H to. BELMONT 2 >4 to. 
MEDORA 2H to. CHESTER 2 to. 

2 for 25 ct«. C' UETT, PEABODY & CO., Maker? 

DRINK CARBONATED 




IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Rav Elected President — Dr. Wil- 
liams Addresses Meeting. 

The Preachers League met on I 
last Wednesday evening for the 
purpose of organizing. The house , 
was called to order by F. H. Me- j 
Gee and the following officers were j 
j elected : 

President — Ray. 

Vice President — Chisolm. 

Secretary — Alford. 

Treasurer — Barrett. 

The office of Historian was cre- 
j ated, and Gates was elected to this 
j office. 

Thirty-three members were en- 
I rolled and we are expecting our 
[ league to be very beneficial to all. 

Before adjourning. Dr. Watkins 
j came forward and made an excel- j 
lent address before the league. We ; 
! hope to have him with us often 
| during the year. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 
TRY THEM 





{ 




Voi. y. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1912. No. 5. 



CLARK’S ORATION 

Speech Delivered by G. C. Clark at N. I. O. A. Contest Last May 

THE NEXT VICTORY OF THE ANGLO SAXON 
. . _ -=• ■ 

Great deeds call for noble men. morning when he met his fate, j 
Only those men in whose veins runs well could he say, “I die in peace,” 
the red blood of a virile race can for his work was finished and an- 
blaze the path for the world’s on- other continent acknowledged the 
ward march. Every race has had power of the blue-eyed race, 
its allotted work, and the proud But not in war alone has this 
race of the Anglo-Saxon is no ex- mighty people set its seal on the 
ception. pages of history. The greatest ' 

Follow me for a moment while constructive mind in the history of 
we review the history of the Anglo- statesmanship, a mind that thought 
Saxon on the battlefield, — a history in terms of continents and nations, 
not marked by age but crowned bent its energies to the building of 
with progress from its beginning a powerful Anglo-Saxon empire, 
to the present time. 1 and from his desk in London, Wil- 

King Alfred, the West Saxon, , Earn Pitt, the Great Commoner, 
sounded the bugle blast that called directed the destinies of England, 
the men of his own blood together America, India, and the domain of 
and began the most marvellous his- the sea. His fondest dream was a 
tory of the greatest people that the ! mighty empire girdling the world 
world has ever known. The con- with the principles of Anglo-Saxon 
flict which ensued was not only a i freedom. 

conflict between Dane and Saxon, j But it was not to be. God had 
but between Thor and Christ. A willed that the empire whose build- 
challenge came from the warrior ing was the master-piece of this 
god to the Prince of Peace. The ; far-seeing statesman, who ranks 
struggle began, Christianity con- with Alexander, Caesar, and Peter 
quered, and England became a na- i the Great, this one undivided coun- 
tion. try, should now be separated, and 

Now since she has taken her for a K es the t wo resulting world 
place among the nations of the earth P owers should walk ln diverse P aths - 
she must battle for existence. The now at P eace ’ now at war > until to- 
bugle called again, and the yeo- day they stand shoulder to shoulder 
men of England faced the aristoc- ’ n tke £ reat movement that looks 
racy of mighty Spain. When the to the banishment of war from inter- 
black clouds of war cleared away ; nat ^ ona ^ P°Etics. 
and the bright sun arose over the ' Thus the powerful English-speak- 
“white cliffs of Albion,” it was re- ! ing people that delight to honor the 
vealed to the anxious watchers not j common heroes of two nations, the 
only that the Armada was de- people whose hearts thrill at the 
stroyed and Spain humbled, but '■ names of Shakespeare and Henry 
that England was the mistress of | V, of Milton and Cromwell, this 
the deep. i people have carried to the highest 

Time passed, and England grew, P°* n,; ot perfection uar and the 
but soon the world must witness politics of war. But to-day we 
another combat. The scene had stand at a point where war belongs 
shifted across the Atlantic to the 1 lEc past. Or.ly v esterdav this 
Plains of Abraham ; and the strug- ' ST 03 -! evd was permissible, today 
gle was to determine the strength ^ * s absolutely wrong, 
of the English people in the Western A crowning victory over this 
world. -The French, haughty, proud, wrong is the next great deed as- 
and brave, were out-witted by the signed to the two vast nations that 
chivalrous Wolfe; and on that glad tod_ay face each other across the 



ever-narrowing waters of an ocean 
that unites for peaceful pursuits 
rather than divides into \var-like 
camps. Already there is a voice 
crying in the wilderness of war and 
w T aste,‘‘ Prepare ye the way for the 
next victory of the Anglo-Saxon — 
the establishment of universal 
peace.” Nor shall we be discour- 
aged if progress toward this ideal j 
seems slow : 

“Heaven is not gained by a single 
bound, 

We build the ladder by which we 
rise 

From the lowly earth to the vault- 
ed skies, 

And mount to its summit round 
by round.” 

It is a vast and mighty chasm 
across which we look from the evil 
of w*ar to the righteousness of peace, 
and the goal seems far away, but — 
“Not in vain the distant beacons. 
Forward, forward, let us range, 

Let the great world spin forever 
Down the ringing grooves of 
change.” 

But war and the love of war are 
strongly entrenched in the minds 
and hearts of men. Nation still 
rises against nation because we 
have not yet agreed upon a better 
method of settling disputes and be- 
cause the animal side of our nature 
can yet be aroused by the so-called 
protectors of our nation, who arc, 
in fact, human vampires sucking 
the life-blood of toiling millions. 
When seventy-two cents of every 
dollar spent by the American gov- 
ernment goes to support army and 
navy, or to pension those made 
helpless by past wars, it comes over 
us with appalling force, that wheth- 
er in peace or in war, it is the hum- 
ble array of toiling humanity that 
must win the victory or go down in 
defeat and death. The glory and 
the applause, the tumult and the 
shouting are for the military hero, j 
while the crushing burden of un- 
holy war falls on the man whose 
labor supports the nation. 

We hasten then to shed our 
brother’s blood because the warrior 
has been the ideal of the orator and 

(Continued on page two) 



MILLSAPS CLASS ’12. 



Last Year's Senior Class Fast 
Rounding into Judges, Phy- 
sicians and Business Men. 



A college has no advertisement 
of equal value to that of the prom- 
inence which her Alumni take after 
graduation. That Millsaps is well 
advertised can be shown, taking 
only a single instance, by the po- 
sitions that last year’s class, — mere 
fledglings, — have taken in the great 
world of “get-up and hustle.” From 
the energy which they have shown 
in getting down to work “right 
now” and the prominence of the 
positions which they hold at pres- 
ent, although less than one year 
removed form the wings of their 
Alma Mater, it can be expected 
that before long the Class of ’12 
will number among its Alumni bank 
and college presidents, M. D.’s, Ph.- 
D.’s, L. L. D.’s and D. D.’s. 

A few are still continuing their 
studies in this and other institutes 
that they may be still better pre- 
pared to tackle the world and sup- 
port a wife. 

Farve Adams, that genial and 
happy-go-lucky person, is now a 
theological student at Vanderbilt. 
Some day, it is prophesied, a book 
will appear: “Baseball in Biblical 
Times,” by Bishop M. F. Adams, 
author of “The Good Jokes Re- 
lated by Job to M. F. Adams.” 

Of course, Walter Henderson, 
“Louisiana’s mocking-bird,” could 
not let Farve be separated from him 
so he joined him at Vanderbilt, 
from whence in the distant future, 
he expects to emerge as a full- 
fledged “saw-bones” and “pill-roll- 
er.” 

Prospective Supreme Judges are 
plentiful. Fulton Thompson, E. 
H. Green and U. F. Logue have 
formed a temporary partnership 
for the purpose of instructing Judge 
Whitfield in the rudiments of law, 
and it is certain that if they have 
advised him on all the points of 
law and equity, the knowledge of 
which they have shown in the 
various sessions of the Moot Court , 

(Continued on page six) 





2 



Cite purple anD eatme 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan _.Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern — Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurids Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. Carraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford.. Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain.... Treasurer 

Junior. 

D: J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom.. Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount....: Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems. 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T. W eems. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

- Mid-Session Debaters 



| C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

-Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse ..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

| R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

• Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

.T. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

I S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

; P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

(Continued from page one) 

| the poet. In song and story we 
see war from its sunny side alone. 
We see the battle-scarred hero, the 
| glorious triumph, the palms of vic- 
tory. We do not see the agonizing i 
: soldier writhing in death, his last j 
painful gasp a protest against the 
sacrifice of a human life on the altar 
of personal ambition. We do not 
see the mother as she stands in 
the door-way watching with ever I 
fainter hope for the return of the [ 
one support of her declining years. 
We hear not the sob of the maiden 
i in her first sorrow, nor do we see 
the silvered head of the old man 
brought down in grief to the grave. 
Our excited imagination is stirred 
only by beating drums, flaunting 
, flags, and shouts of victory. Too 
long have our writers taught us i 
that it is our highest honor to lay j 
down our lives on the field of battle. 
In sober truth it should be as great 
a disgrace for a civilized man to ' 
waste his God-given life of oppor- 
tunity in a legalized war as in a 
lawless duel. It was this same mis- 
taken sense of honor that sent Alex- 
ander Hamilton to the fatal field 
and laid low the mightiest intellect 
of American state-craft at the feet 
of a political renegade. And thus 
are men, made in the image of God, 
slain like beasts of the field by 
creatures often lower than these 
same beasts. Thousands of noble, , 
capable men, whose brain and brawn 
could have blessed a whole world, 
have fallen like cattle, a sacrifice 
to this false conception of honor, i 
when the stroke of a pen, guided 
by the hand of a statesman, could j 
have adjusted all troubles without 
the clash of arms. 

When once the enlightened mind 
of the race that has made modem 



England and America shall grasp ' 
the appalling cost of war in men and 
money we shall lay aside these out- 
worn ideas of glory and honor, — 

“Were half the power that fills the 
world with terror, 

Were half the wealth bestowed on 
camps and courts. 

Given to redeem the human mind 
from error. 

There were no need of arsenals or 
forts.” 

If an infinitesimal part of what 
has been expended in preparing 
| the mighty engines of war had been 
devoted to the development of rea- 
son and the diffusion of Christ -like 
principles, all the terror, devasta- 
tion and demoralization of this evil 
! would today be mere records for 
the industry of the antiquarian. 

Let us frankly admit that it is 
over the blood-stained battlefields 
of the past that the twin nations of 
Anglo-Saxon stock have marched 
■ to power and glory, but today they 
stand in the forefront of civiliza- 
tion because they have a noble and 
sublime mission lo perform — a mis- 
sion to be a light to them that sit in 
the darkness of war and death, 
to lead them out into the light of 
universal peace. 

We, the sons of Anglo-Saxon war- 
riors. must teach the world that 
what is just and right between man 
and man is just and right between 
nation and nation, that the God 
whose chosen tide is the Prince of 
Peace has established but one code 
of morals. Xo longer shall we teach 
and practice a double code, no 
longer shall we call that right in 
war which is wrong in peace. Rath- 



S pins & 

emblems 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 

RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson, Miss. 



Rensselaer 



Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



Polytechnic 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Courses in Civil Engineering: (C. E.). Mechanical En- 
gineering >1. E.i, Electrical Engineering (E. t .), and 
General Science 1 E. S. •. Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical, Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildtu^s 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 




Che Purple anP Mite 



3 ' 



er shall we from school room, pul- 
pit, and home, teach the young 
men who make the America of 
to-morrow that the true reliance of 
a “great, free, powerful, and inde- 
pendent nation” must be the irre- 
sistible force — not of arms — but of 
law and justice. 

Today the great offspring of stur- 
dy sires, England and America, 
stand in a moral and physical pre- 
eminence, secure from attack, fated 
for leadership, with traditions of 
conquest that tpetoken still greater 
victories. God has given our people 
strength and power to conquer a 
world, but He has willed that this 
conquest should be one of peace. 
That day has come when the “far- 
flung battle line” shall yield to the 
suggestive influence of a holy zeal 
for higher manhood. Thus shall our 
honored race still lead the advance 
in cementing together the nations 
of the earth into a new “Parliament 
of man,” where even,- people shall 
retain individual characteristics, but 
shall delight to obey a common law 
of justice and peace. 

This time of peace, the vision of 
the poet and the dream of the philos- 
opher, shall be at hand when the 
warring nations accept those two 
principles which are now domi- 
nating the life of the Anglo-Saxon 
and which are destined to make of 
this battle-seamed earth a glorious 
home, — those radiant truths, the 
Fatherhood of God and the Broth- 
erhood of Man. The little streams 
and rivu’ets of kindly sympathy 
and fraternal justice flowing out 
from the lives of consecrated work- 
ers for international peace are gath- 
ering into a mighty river that leads 
on to the great ocean of universal 
brotherhood. 

Then shall the poet no longer 
look for inspiration to the jagged 
battle-axe or the reeking field of 
carnage. Then shall he sing as his 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



i greatest hero the man who in- 
spired by duty to suffering human- 
ity gains a glorious tomb in com- 
bating disease and death in the 
j crowded hovels of the poor, or the 
man who, in the face of famine and 
flood, reclaims a barren desert to 
be an earthly paradise. 

And shall not and I join hands 
with others of our noble race to 
hasten this triumphant day? Let 
us endeavor at our appoined posts 
of duty, to start a ripple on the 
ocean of public opinion that will 
gather mass and power until all 
the people of the earth shall strike 
hands, in a common purpose, no 
longer to destroy but henceforth 
to help — not to war but to arbi- 
trate. Let us nobly stand back of 
those great leaders of the two great- 
est nations, who as torch bearers 
of a mighty movement signal to 
each other across the once stormy 
Atlantic. And though mistaken 
views of public policy have marred 
and perhaps defeated the first great 
universal arbitration treaty, it is 
not in the sturdy manhood of our 
fighting race to be conquered. De- 
layed but not defeated, this first 
of the great peace pacts of the re- 
generated world shall be ratified. 
Then will be established in the 
brighter years to come a Supreme 
Court of Humanity from which 
there can be no appeal and to which j 
all nations shall bow with willing j 
submission. 

On that glad day when such a ! 
court shall be established and the 
praises of liberated man shall blend 
in celestial harmony with the 'mus- 
ic of the Spheres, then shall all the 
nations of this re-bom world arise 
and in thunderous tones exclaim, 
“God bless the Anglo-Saxon!” 



Found in a Freshman’s note- 
book. — “Dear Papa: Please send: 

me a donation. I am having the 
time of my life. I have been beating 
these old show fellows out of the 
nicest cigars, and, just think. Papa, ( 
I came very near winning a quarter 
twice. Please forward check at 
once.” 



What a gleam of genuine pleas- \ 
ure it was to see the beaming coun- 
tenance of our old property mana- 
ger, Cook £elby, on the campus j 
during the Fair! Cook is a Co-ed I 
at Whitworth this session and from ! 
all reports, is doing good work. 

Well, we wonder why certain 
members of the faculty w-ent thro’ 
the “squeezer?” 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 

THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

21 4p2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


DR. G. 31. GALLOWAY 

DENTIST 

Office over Kress. Room 1. 

Cumb. Phone 2013. 


GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
T. O. BYRD, Prop. 


* 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 
HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

HALL DRUG COMPANY 
Jackson, Miss. 


JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Hie Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON. MISS. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building. Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 
JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE HAH, HAH. HAH. 

Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the “M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 
Call and see our Fountain Pens, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 





BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



{ 



4 



Of Purple anO cCIbitr 



Cbe purple anO Mite 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief I 

F. T. Scott..... -...Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J,. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. Gates Asst. Business Manager 



Matter intended for publication j 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, j 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



Y. M. C. A. 



A well rounded college career 
may be said to be divided into three 
phases — that of the mental, phys- 
ical and spiritual development. 

Probably most people consider 
that the principal purpose of the 
college is the development of the 
mind, yet when we stop to think, 
we realize that a well developed 
mind is of little value to a student 
unless he has at the same time a 
sound and well developed body. 
A further analysis reveals the fact 
that spiritual development is like- 
wise an essential requirement of a 
well rounded individual. What no- 
bler and yet simpler conception can 
the human mind conceive of 
than the sturdy character build- 
ing which is continually going hand 
in hand with the noble develop- 
ment of the mind. 

The Athletic Association is a j 
potent factor in promoting those j 
activities that go to make a man’s J 
body strong and healthful — the 
class room routine and the literary 
societies have as their ideal the 
perfection of a man’s mental capac- 
ities. But greater than all of these 
is the college Y.. M. C. A., fcr it 
includes them all. Having as its 
motto, “Body, mind, and spirit,” 
it is the embodiment of all that is 
best and noblest. It is the promo- 
ter of every good and noble move- 
ment in college. Its weekly meet- 
ings, conducted by students or 
friends of the Association, are a 
source of inspiration to higher and 
better living and furnish a relig- . 



ious atmosphere that surrounds the 
college at all times. 

A man’s entrance to college marks 
a critical moment in the develop- 
ment of these questions for which 
the Y. M. C. A. stands. Then, as 
at no other time, is a man suscepti- 
ble to the various influences and as- 
sociations that go to make up his 
environments. This being the case 
it is well for him to throw around 
himself all the protection he can 
against evil influences. . Nothing 
he can do will be of more benefit in 
this respect than a speedy affiliation [ 
with the Y. M. C. A. Every man in 
School has had an opportunity of j 
joining the Association, and if you [ 
haven’t done so, let us urge you to 
ally yourself with this great band 
at the earliest possible moment. 



Lau) Department 



Among the distinguished Alumni 
who attended the Fair were Robert 
E. Bennett, R. R. Norquist, D. H. 
Glass, J. M. Morse, and District 
Attornev East. 



The courts of Illinois are soon to 
be called upon for a decision as to 
the legality of a marriage by mail. 



It is with regret that we announce 
the illness of Judge Harper. He is 
still confined to his room, but is 
improving and we wish for him an 
earlv recovery. 



CLARK'S SPEECH. 



Elsewhere in this issue will be 
found a complete reproduction of J 
the speech which our representative, , 
G. C. Clark, delivered at the Mis- 
sissippi Inter-collegiate Oratorical 
Association, at Meridian, Miss., last 
May. As all of those who were 
present know, Clark had a great 
speech and made a most creditable 
showing on this occasion, although 
he was awarded second place by 
the judges, many, while accepting j 
with absolute confidence the wis- j 
dom of the decision, believe that 
the judges would have done equally 
well had they given Clark first 
place. To say the least the students 
of Millsaps College are proud of 
the effort Clark made and The 
Purple and White takes great pleas- 
ure in reproducing the speech. 



Russell gives promise of develop- 
ing into a great lawyer. His latest 
evidence of precocity is relative to 
the marriage cpntract. He gives 
it as his candid opinion that a great 
percentage of marriage contracts 
are void because they are formed 
on Sundav. 



Up in Tacoma, Washington, a 
lawyer named Wilcox, purchased a 
J second hand automobile. He had 
his partner out for a spin. The car 
would not go. The partner crawled 
| under the machine while Wilcox 
J started to do some oiling up. The 
| partner suddenly crawled out with 
la yell: — “What are you trying to 
jdo?” he asked, glaring at Wilcox. 

“Why, I’ve just oiled the cylin- 
i der.” 

! “Cylinder, — h !” said the 

partner, “That’s my ear you poured 
that oil into!” 



J. H. Donnell has been absent 
from the city for a few days at- 
tending to his large volume of 
business. 



R. R. Hardy has shown that his 
heart is in the right place by raising 
a contribution in his home town, 
Clinton, for the Wilson-Marshall 
campaign fund. 



The case before the Moot Court 
for Thursday night was the suit of 
John Andrews vs. Pete Norwood. 
The notorious Cat Hartman, as 
usual, was involved. Counsel for 
the plaintiff were Messrs. Bailey, 
Blount and Currie, while the de- 
fense was representd by Messrs. 
Butler, Thompson and Russell. 



The Basketball squad is hard at 
work, and if present indications j 
count for anything a winning team '■ 
is assured. Manager Kirkland is 
arranging an excellent schedule that 
will be printed when completed. 



Court at Lexington the first of 
the week. 



DONTS FOR FRESHMEN. 

If you never smoked at home, 
don’t begin it now. 

Study like fury the first term and 
make a good impression. — Don’t 
put it off. 

Don’t cut if it isn’t necessary. 
You will need them later. 

Don’t knock — boost ! 

Don’t study at chapel during 
prayer, or sit when others rise to 
sing. 

Don’t overdo your bragging. If 
there is anything worth while in 
you it will surely crop out. 

Don’t believe all the tales you 
hear. 

Don’t “prep” all the time. It 
has been known to grow tiresome. 

Don’t be too “fresh” — You might 
succeed in convincing the older 
men that you are so “fresh” that 
you are green. 

Don’t go to town at night with- 
out permission. 

Don’t fail to join the Athletic-. 
Association and the Y. M. C. A. 



The Freshmen have been busy 
this week writing compositions on 
“What We Saw at the Fair.” We 
understand that most of them cen- 
tered their attention on the “squee- 
zer.” 



Freshman: (Entering girls’ 

room at Library) “Please ma’am 
direct me to Millsaps ; papa 

didn’t want me to go to Bel- 
haven. ’ ’ 



The Fair is a thing of the past — 
likewise the Freshman’s hard-earned 
cash. ' - 



Tailored Sp i 


icially For ' 


foil 


Every garment will be strictly hand tailored to 
your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 

Best Fit 1 ^ Best Assortment 

Best Values Best Service 

others at $16.50, $!8, $20, $22.50, & $25 


STANDARD WOOLEN Cl 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 


j. 

Miss. 






Oc purple a no Mite 



5 



BISHOP THIRKIELD’S 
ADDRESS. 

Talk on Manhood — “Find Thyself” 
the Slogan. 

Great Ovations Given Major Mill- 
saps and Dr. Watkins. 

The students and faculty en- 
joyed a great treat at the chapel 
exercises on last Tuesday morning 
in the shape of a lecture by Bishop 
W. P. Thirkicld. 

Bishop Thirkield is a great speak- 
er. He has a superb flow of lan- 
guage and his manner of speaking 
is so attractive that he has no 
trouble in holding his audience. 
On this morning he spoke for over 
an hour and when he stopped ev- 
eryone seemed to be sorry that he 
was through. 

After delivering a short eulogv 
on the life and character of Bishop 
Galloway, telling how glad he was 
to speak in a chapel graced by a 
picture of such a man, he launched 
into a discussion of a real man. 
He thinks that the highest aim of 
an education is to make a man. 
Manhood is in achievement, not 



the most important things toward 
a successful career is for a person 
to find himself and to develop a per- 
sonality. He should know what he 
is like, and if that doesn’t suit, he 
should strive to be like something 
else. 

Another important thing is self- 
control. The Bishop said that ma- 
ny people have an erroneous idea 
as to what self-control is. The act 
of self-control is not throttling but 
directing. He likes the man of 
passion, but he likes to see the 
passion restrained. He has no use 
for the man with no temper, but 
he likes to see him keep it in bounds. 

He congratulated the students 
in being able to get their education 
at a Christian college. It is easier 
to live a Christian life in a relig- 
ious atmosphere than in a non- 
religious one, and a great many 
colleges that are not under the 
auspices of a Christian Church are 
essentially non-religious. 

A person to be a man, must have 
a purpose. Bishop Thirkield thinks 
that the man without a purpose is 
beyond redemption. He stalks 
around over the earth in an humble 













You'll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 






TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43,332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, ’ 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. .T. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 

C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, . S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green. Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



in heredity, or environment. Of way as if to apologize for being BOYS! Come and See the New 
course these things may help one I alive. He is in the way because he p a ]j Styles in all leathers and 
to make a true man, but unless one j hasn’t a strong enough purpose to Can furnish VOU this Shoe 

works, unless he is a doer of things, i give him enough energy to get out . , _ . 

no sort Of conditions or c.rcum- of it. m tan > S un metal and patent, 

stances can make him a real man. , Toward the latter part of his | button or lace. 



The Bishop thinks that one of speech, while reviewing the life of 



Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SE UTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 







6 



Cl )c purple anD mbitt 



James A. Garfield, Bishop Thirkield 
sprang a surprise which brought 
forth a great ovation for Major 
Millsaps who was present on the 
stage. The early history of the 
founder of Millsaps College is not 
widely known . Therefore, when 
the Bishop reviewed this history, 
telling how he went through col- 
lege on fifty cents a week, and how 
he finally ended up with a diploma 
from Harvard, reserving always the 
name to the last, there went up a 
shout from the audience, the like 
of which was never heard in Millsaps 
chapel before. When the enthusi- 
asm of the students had spent it- 
self, the Bishop pulled out his 
handkerchief, and waved it above 
his head. His example was fol- 
lowed by the students, and another 
shout went up that shook the win- 
dows of the chapel like a furious 
storm. 

In ending. Bishop Thirkield paid 
a high tribute to our President, Dr. 
Watkins. This brought forth an- 
other volley of applause from the 
students. 

(Continued from page one) 

that they have a very short while 
longer to tarry with him. 

Feeling that the University Law 
Faculty is not the equal of Mill- 
saps in mental aptness, Fred Smith, 
on account of his vocal stamina, 
has condescended to instruct the 
U. of M. Law 7 Faculty in the legal 
branches, but thinks it wall take, 
even him, at best two years to do it. \ 

Daniel Ananias Bufkin is located 
in the capital city and says that he 
is talking a million dollars of life 
insurance and expects to write at 
least a thousand dollars worth. In 
his leisure monemts he is worship- 
ing at the shrine of Minerva. (Dr. 
Swartz, take note.) 

In various parts of the world, 
in fact from Lucedale to Louisville, 
five brilliant products of the Mill- 
saps brand are teaching the young 



■ idea how to — what is it They teach 
the young idea to do? No matter, 
you have likely heard the expres- 
sion before. Jim Broom, with 6.0 
assistants and 240.00 students re- 
ports that every idea shoots with 
an air gun, just like he does. The 
report is being circulated that Prof. 
Harrell expects to visit Prof. Broom 
in a few days in order to investi- 
gate an unusual physical phenom- 
enon — the air is all hot. 

Misses. G. B. Clark and “How- 
son” Lott are Professoring in Ma- 
gee and Columbus, respectively. 

Messrs. Dodds and Whitson are 
Professoressing somewhere so far 
from the railroad that communica- 
' tions have not been received from 
! them and for fear that they have 
not yet reached their destinations, 
it is best not to locate 
them. It has been rumored 
that one is in the San Francisco 
School for Lady Suffragettes, the 
other in the Latin Department of 
the University of Timbuctoo. 
Where ever they are, the T. A. is 
the only text -book. 

R. Ernest Steen is editing the 
Jackson Daily News, assisted by 
Hon. Fred Sullens. Manly Cooper is 
located in Helena, Ark., looking 
for a wife and preparing for her 
support in office of the New 
South Oil Co. 

“Coach” Foster is Athletic In- 
structor in the Porter Military 
Academy, Columbia, S. C. 

Miss Honeycutt is resting from 
her years of knowledge seeking and 
is at home to her friends on North 
President Street. 

Joe Henry Morris has become a 
philanthropist and is assisting his 
father in keeping Jacksbn cool in ; 
the summer time. 

RandolplAPeets is connected with 
the purchasing department of the 
Jackson Light and Traction Co. 
He is generally given credit for 




FOLDING MACHINE PLANT 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing a battery of 
five of the latest model folding machines. 



I 



FOR • THE • YOUNG ^MAN 

“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



The Great Southern Hotel 

Gulfport, Mississippi. 



THE MOST PALATITL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



Golf Bathing 

Tennis EUROPEAN Hunting 

Fishing PLAN 250 Rooms 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, .... Manager 



College Boys! 

Trade with and meet your friends at our store. We want you 
to feel at home in our place of business. 

We want your drug business. Remember! “The Old Reliable 
Drug Store” is The Best in the city. Prescription work our specialty, 
all prescriptions being filled by a graduate and registered druggist. 
We send for and deliver your prescriptions to the campus. 

The most complete stock in Jackson of STATIONERY, CANDitS, 
CIGARS, best, good and better. FOUNTAIN PENS, the perfect ones. 
BRUSHES of all kinds, TOILET ARTICLES, RUBBER GOODS; in 
fact, everything to be found in an up-to-date Drug Store. 

Remember the place. All cars lead to our door. 

We deliver quick. Try us. Phones 109 and 1499. 

Hunter & McGee 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Your SMOKERS and RECEPTIONS will not be complete unless 
you will let 

MANGUM 

serve you. He knows how and will do it reasonably. He also carries 
the best line of 

FANCY CANDY 

to be found in the City of Jackson. The best that’s made. When 
down town don’t forget to drink at his Soda Fountain where only the 
best of everything is served College Men. 

Headquarters for Millsaps Collegians. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




Cbe Purple anD Mite 




the new cars of which Jackson is 
so proud. 

Bre’r Bill Thomas is riding a 
circuit around Alt. Pisgah, and re- 
ports large numbers on the mourn- 
er’s bench every sendee. He didn’t 
say whether they were all of the 
feminine persuasion or not. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 



LOCAL NEWS 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



D. D. Cameron, of the Class of 
’ll, was a pleasant visitor on the 
campus Friday and Saturday. 



A STRONG ARM 



You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes 
strong and keeps you well. 



D. & M. ATHLETIC' GOODS 



L. C. (“Big Kirk’’) spent a few 
days with his brother, J. B. Kirk- 
land, and fraternity- .mates last 
week. Kirkland says he has a 
“bumber” crop this year, and is 
very seriously contemplating mar- 
riage. 



If you like good cigars call at 
Sistrunk’s and get one. Try a cold 
drink and some of his stationery 
also. 



Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 



FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Let’s don’t break training any 
more — until Thanksgiving. 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



Mr. Hannon — Why are the Co- 
eds always on hand at the chapel? 

Miss Shurlds — To be there when 
the “hymns” are given out. 



• Have T. B. Doxey do your tail- 
oring and save the special discount 
he gives to college boys. 



Hon. Fred W. Long, Secretary 
of the State Sunday Schools, was a 
welcome visitor on the campus 
Tuesdav. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 



KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co 



Prof. E. Y. Burton made some 
observations of the moon, and it 
is reported, made some very won- 
derful discoveries last week — down 
on the pike. 



Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



Rev. W. B. Lipscomb conducted 
chapel exercises Thursday', and 
spoke a few words of encourage- 
ment to the bovs. 



Rev. E. S. Lewis, of the North 
Miss. Conference, conducted chapel 
exercises Tuesday' morning. 



ATTEND THE BEST 



Rev. W. Chisolm, our efficient 
book-dealer, has ordered a “1913 
model” auto. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



The Only Business University in the South 



Will some kindly disposed gen- 
tleman please tell us what Prof. 
“Duckey” Lin carries in that black 
satchel? 



We have no branch schools and devote our 
ENTIRE time to ONE INSTITUTION which 
POSITIVELY enables us to give our students 
the CREAM of Business Training. 



Minor Russell, of last year’s, 
Freshman Class, visited frat -mates 
during the Fair. 



THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 



We are as good as the best, 

And are better than all the rest. 



Among the new students who 
have recently entered none are wel- 
comed more warmly' than George 
Harris. Harris is reported to be a 
good base ball man and will 
add much to the team’s strength. 



Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



PREP LOCALS. 

The student body regrets the 
departure of Charlie Leadbetter, 
who left for his home last Saturday'. 

There has been added to our num- 
ber two new students, Harris and 
Greenway. We are glad to welcome 
both of them. 



Prentiss Literary Society failed to 
hold its regular meeting Friday 
night. 

Harry Wheeler enjoyed a visit 
from his father during the past 
week. 



Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 



“Skeate” Williams was one of 
the smiling visitors during the Fair. 



Have Hobbs do your barbering, 
if it’s convenience and good ser- 
vice you want. — Shack No. 4. 



When two -or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



James F. McClure, Jr. spent the 
week end at Fayette, Miss., with 
home folks. 



Owing to the lyceum lecture, the 



8 



Che Iputple anD fiHfritg 



Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 

S. P. McRAE 



Even -one enjoyed the lecture giv- 1 
en bv Bishop W. P. Thirkield, last 
Tuesday morning. His subject was, 
“Find Thyself,” and the Bishop 
certainly handled it in a masterly 



R. Edward Stein returned to 
schpol Monday, much to the delight 
of his friends and frat -mates. 
— 

Mr. Williams (introducing his 
girl to Moore) — Mr. Moore, meet 
my Miss E . 

Dan Bufkin attended the Lyceum 
entertainment last Friday night. 
Dan says he is doing everybody he 
can in the insurance business now. 

John Philips spent last Friday 
and Saturday with home people. 

David Glass, of the law class of 
’ll, was here during the Fair. Dave 
says he makes a specialty of di- 
ivorce cases, and has a large prac- 



■ — -1 Ask Brown the color of the lady 

S P McRAE I he was l * ta S£ in g on ” to When he 

[emerged from the “squeezer” at 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson . the Fair. 

Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard 

Mr. Ruble — Lassiter, what is 

& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle your rea] j ncome j 

Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. Lassiter (thoughtlessly)— 12:30 a. 

m., during the Fair. 

Special Prices to College Boys. 

214 West Capitol Street Mr ' McLure (standin s on the cor- 
ner at Brown’s) — Hackman, can 

Near the Union Depot you drive me out to Milisaps coi- 

lege? 

^ Hackman — No, Mistah, I don’t 
^ believe I have any harness to fit you. 

|jjB Williams, of Webster county 

BOH spent Fair week with D. J. Savage. 

Miss Hunter Cain spent several 

days of last week visiting her broth- 
f |\*/ ers on the campus and taking in 
If the sights of the city. 

Notch COLLARS — 

the belmont style in four heights S. E. (“Big Sis”) Williamson, an 

GLASGOW In. BELMONT 2H In. 

medora 2 % in. Chester 2 in. old Milisaps man, was here Thurs- 

>for?5cts. C' UETT, PEABODY <t CO., Makers , . r 

i • f day, visiting fraternity mates. 

DRINK CARBONATED The students of Milisaps Col- 
lege were very deeply grieved last 
week to hear of the death of Wil- 
M U Jt' liam Simms Clark, one of last year’s 

m graduates. Clark had many friends 

Wi' on the campus who join his rela- 

IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS tives in mournin s his death - 

I a | n , , . The lvceum entertainment given 

loca-Cola Bottling Bo. in the chapel was a most inter- 

° esting performance and immensely 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI enjoyed by those present. 



Arrow 

'Notch COLLARS 

THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2H In. BELMONT 214 In. 
MEDORA 2H In. CHESTER 2 to. 

DRINK CARBONATED 



IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 



“Dunlap” Hats jackson-s greatest store «p ega |” shoes 

$5.00 o i inuMcnu theCoNeg8Boys ' 

in all the new O. J. JUnNoUN Friend 

Fall Styles COMPANY * 3 - 50 to * 5 



$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



Standard of Perfection. 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Milisaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Milisaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



. ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Milisaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 






Vol. V. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1912. No. 6. 



SACRED CONCERT 
Y. M. C. A. Has a Special 
Program for To-nigh 



ro Pe nSt Mosic Enthusiastic Alumni Meeting 



The meeting at the Y. M. C. A. 
to-night will be a departure from 
the usual method of conducting 
the meetings in that instead of 
having a single speaker there will 
be several. The topic for discus- 
sion will be “Prayer,” and the va- 
rious phases of the subject will be 
presented by some of the most 
forceful speakers on the college 
campus and in the Preparatory 
School. The meeting will be pre- 
sided over by Mr. J. T. Weems. 

In addition to the speeches there 
will be a special music program com- 
posed of the best sacred numbers in 
the Victor Catalogue; many of these 
are by the best sacred singers in 
the country, whom it will be a gen- 
uine treat to hear. The program 
is as follows: 

Ave Maria (Gounod) — Elizabeth 
Wheeler. 

I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say — 
Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler. 

Crossing the Bar (Tennyson) — 
Frank Stanley. 

The Great Camp-meeting — The 
Fisk Jubilee Quartet. 

Balm of Gilead — The Fisk Jubi- 
lee Quartet. 

Abide with Me — Richard Jose. 

I’m the Child of a King — Eliz- 
abeth Wheeler. 

0, Morning Land — Stanley and 
McDonough. 

God be with You till We Meet 
Again — Haydn Quartet. 

HONOR COUNCIL COMPLETED 

Wroten and Foster Elected as 
Floaters. 

On Tuesday night of last week 
the student body assembled en 
masse in the College auditorium 
for the purpose of electing two men ; 
to represent the student body at j 
large on the Honor Council. Men 
had already been elected from the 
different classes, and these two 
floaters were to complete the coun- 
cil. 

The meeting was called to order 



Jackson Men Organize Alumni Association. — Felix Gunter Chosen 
President — Promotion of Athletic Interests Main Issue. 



Quite a number of the most prom- 
inent men of Jackson met last Fri- 
day afternoon at the law office of 
J. A. Baker, for the purpose of 
organizing a Millsaps Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Jackson. The Associa- 
tion will consist of former students 
of Millsaps in Jackson and thro’ 
out the State. Its purpose is to 
devise ways and means of arousing 
the interest of all former students 
in the affairs of the College, es- 
pecially in athletics, and to assist 
in every way possible in bringing 
| the College prominently before the 
public. 

One of the principle features of 
the organization was the election 
of officers which resulted as follows : 
Felix Gunter, President; L. M. 
Gaddis, First Vice-President; Geo. 
B. Power, Second Vice-President; 
John W. Saunders, Secretary and 
Treasurer, and Tom L. Bailey, As- 

by Prof. J. M. Burton. Having 
stated the object of the meeting, 
he announced that nominations 
would be heard for the place. The 
first elected was B. F. Foster. 
Since his entrance at Millsaps dur- 
ing the session of 1910-11, Foster 
has had the entire confidence of 
the students and faculty. It can 
be safely said that no one could 
have been selected in whose fair- 
ness and impartiality the students 
would have placed greater con- ( 
fidence. 

The next elected was J. D. Wro- 
ten. Wroten is one of the most 
prominent members of the Senior 
class, and also one of the most 
popular ones. Every one who knows j 
him knows him to be a man of j 
sterling integrity and fairness of j 
judgment. 

After the election was over. Prof. 
Burton read a resolution . adopted j 



sistant Secretary and Treasurer. 

These men are all prominent and 
successful business or professional 
men, and no movement over which J 
j they have control can fail. 

In addition to the above officers 
an executive board whose duties 
will be of a general advisory char- 
acter, will be appointed by the 
j President in the near future. 

Committees were also appointed 
i to draw up a constitution and by- 
laws, and to look after the prelim- 
ianary arrangements. 

The Alumni are awaking to the 
fact that they can help the College 
very materially by taking an en- 
thusiastic enterest in the Associa- 
i tion and they are manifesting this 
interest by their works. Another 
meeting of the Association will be 
called during the coming week and 
a large and enthusiastic session is 
| predicted. 

• 

by the faculty, the substance of ( 
which was that the faculty desires 
that the decisions of the Honor 
Council be considered final. That 
is, there is to be no appeal fo the 
faculty from a decision of the 
Council. 

The Council as completed con- 
sists of Barrett, Condrey, Crocket, 
and Weems, and McGee, from the 
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior classes, respectively; and of 
Foster and Wroten as floaters. Look- 
ing this body of men over, it can 
be safely said that a body of fairer 
judges could x not possibly have been 
selected. It is the ardent of desire 
the writer that they will not have 
a single case to come before them 
during the session; but if, unfor- 
tunately, such should be the case, 
there can be no doubt that the 
person accused will have a fair J 
and impartial trial. 



EXTRA! EXTRA!! 

Mysterious Midnight Meeting! 

PURPLE AND WHITE SCOOPS 
HER COMPETITORS 

Her Reporter right on the Job — 
No other Paper has this Piece 
of News. 

Special Edition Rushed to Convey 
This News to a Waiting Pub- 
lic. — Freshmen Involved. 

About 1 1 :30, Thursday night, as 
a belated reporter of this paper was 
crossing the campus his attention 
was attracted by a number of 
masked persons entering the main 
building of this college. Of course, 
being strictly on the job, he fol- 
lowed at a distance. The conspira- 
tors entered the Lamar Hall, and 
as they had only one candle for 
light, Sherlocko, the Reporter, was 
able to view the proceedings from 
a safe distance. One of the con- 
spirators, evidently a Sophomore 
from the outspoken manner in which 
he took charge of things, presided. 
Another, a Junior, from the cut of 
his clothes, acted as Secretary. At 
first, the newspaper man was un- 
able to catch the gist of things, but 
when he heard the following reso- 
lutions read, he knew what had 
happened. They are published be- 
low for the benefit of the public. 
This paper will, no doubt, be ac- 
cused of underhanded methods, but 
the public must have the news : 

To All Concerned: 

Inasmuch as the Freshman Class 
of this Institution, on account of 
their numbers and physical pro- 
portions, evidently consider them- 
selves the equal, if not the superior, 
of the upper classmen of said In- 
stitution; Therefore, 

Be it Resolved, This state of 
affairs cannot exist and must be 
corrected. 

Be it therefore ordained: That 
all Freshmen shall have their hair 
trimmed after the fashion commonly 
called “clipping.” 

That it must be done not sooner 







2 



€1 be purple anD Cfltmc 



College Directory 



ijC. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Rav 
R. I. Jolly 



Commencement Debaters 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery— President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. Carraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey — President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems. 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott .Anniversary Orator 

J. T. W eems..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 



R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems „. . (Chairman) 

H. Magee" Business Managers 



than Dec. 15th, 1912, and not I 
later than Dec. 21, 1912. 

That the Sophomore and Junior 
classmen are hereby appointed to 
do the cutting. — The Seniors to 
lend their moral support and cut- 
ting instruments. 

That no Freshman shall under j 
any circumstances escape, except | 
those of feminine persuasion and 
those who on account of delicate 
constitutions fear that such an op- J 
eration will result in pneumonia or 
like disease. (If such an excuse is 
offered a doctor’s certificate must 
be shown, stating that he consid- 1 
ers petitioner a weakling and really 
belonging to the genus feminine 
or infant). Hon. Servetus Love 
Crockett, Grand Howler of the 
Hyenas, is hereby appointed to | 
pass on all such certificates. 

(Signed) Sophomore Class. 

Junior Class. 

Senior Class. 

This day, Oct. 31st, 1912. 

DE OLE PLANTATION BELL. 

In the early morning when the 
sun hab jist come up — 

Twix, der crowin’ ob de rooster 
And der whining ob der pup, 
I’se awakened by de ringing ob 1 
De ole plantation bell; 

By de “rising” ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 



When I’se been working all de 
Mom, in de sun so hot; 

And though I’se hoeing ob de 
Cotton, my mind’s on dinner 
sot. 

I quit's work by the ringing of de 
Ole plantation bell. 

By de “dinner” ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

When I’se done had my dinner. 

And is feelin’ mighty well; 
And in my ole cane bottom chair 
I’se resting just er spell, 

I’se startled by de ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

By de “working” ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

In de ebening when de sun am 
Jist about going down, 

And de darkies am er creeping 
Ober all de country round, 

I goes home by de ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

By de “ebening” ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

And always, all de time, ebery day I 
It’s jist the same; 

I works, and eats, and sleeps, dat i 
way 

'Cept de days we hab rain. 
Seems like my life is done held up ] 
by de ringin’ ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

By de “rising,” “dinner” “work- 
ing”, “ebening” ringing ob de 
Ole plantation bell. 

C. H. B„ '15. 

A good “Hair Cut” — Hobbs does 
the work at 25 cts. — Shack 4. 



■HI WE CARRY IN 
IPI STOCK FULL 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 

RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



Rensselaer 



Established 1824 

Troy, N- Y. 



Polytechnic 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.\ Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. E.). Electrical Engineering (E. E.), and 
General Science <B. S. Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 

The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 




€hc Iftutple anD Mite 



3 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



Weems Stars as Orator. — Battle of 
Words Waged Between 
Debaters. 



The Lamar Literary Society held 
a very interesting meeting last Fri- 
day night. On account of the ab- 



monthly orator. Arrangements are [ 
already under way for a larger seat- 
ing capacity, and ushers have been ; 
appointed to handle the large crowd 
that is expected the night this gifted j 
young Lamar is to demonstrate his I 
ability to sway multitudes. 

THE GREAT OLD WORLD. 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 



V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 



PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 



Robertson & Robertson 



Second Floor Kress Building Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 



Phone 316 Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



sence of President Montgomery, 
Vice-President Honeycutt presided. 

There was some misunderstand- 
ing concerning the proper program, 
due to the fact that the regular 
meeting of the week before was not 
held. Lusk was excused as declaim- 
er on account of this confusion. 
Weems delivered an excellent ora- 
tion on “The Higher Vision,” which 
was greatly enjoyed by the large 
audience. Weems is one of the best 
orators of the Senior class and it 
is with regret that we recognize the 
lamentable fact that after this year 
this silver-tongued orator will no 
more pour forth in thunderous 
tones his masterly discourses with- 
in our hall. 

The question for debate, “Re- 
solved, That the White Man ; 
Treated the Indian justly in Tak- 
ing his Land,” was next taken up. 
The speakers for the affirmative, j 
Hillman, Patterson and Lusk, made 
eloquent appeals in behalf of their 
side, but to no avail, for their 
arguments were dispersed into thin 
air by the tremendous bombard- 
ment of Selby, Stirling, and Hobbs, 
for the negative. 

The judges, after retiring to a 
dark room and discussing, very 
deliberately, every thing from the 
Bull Moose Party to the Halloween 
raids of the previous night , 1 de- j 
cided in favor of the negative. The 
announcement of their decision was 
greeted with applause. 

Lusk, the Demosthenes of the 
Lamars, was unanimously elected 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



The cynics mock her, 

The red storms rock her, 

The earthquakes shock her, 

But on she rolls ! 

Downcast, elated — 

For ruin slated, 

She still goes freighted 
With human souls! 

- M 3 ,TT ■ - - -1 

- t ? 

The great seas thunder 
And rend asunder — 

The white stars wonder, 

As time grows gray; 

But — reaping, sowing, 

Her way she’s going 
To meet — unknowing — 

A Judgment Day. 

But — joy go with her ! 

Nor slip his tether 
When stormy weather 
Makes grief and moan ! 

Tragedy — jest world — 
Lost-unto-rest world 
Still — still the best world 
We have ever known. 

—Ex. 



Many times we think when look- 
ing upon the lives and deeds of 
great men, that the hand of desti- 
ny has pointed favorably toward 
them. We never stop and consider 
that before this great hour came 
into their lives, there was hard 
study in preparation. So remem- 
ber, young man. before the hour, 
comes the man. 



Be a booster, instead of being 
boosted. The world is looking for 
real wide awake boosters. Men 
who are willing to assume the re- 
sponsibilities of leadership, and do 
their best. So get busy Boothonian 
and help swell the columns of our 
voice with things worth our while. 
— R. B. M. 



We wonder why the benches that 
the Co-eds use in front of the Libra- 
ry were moved away Halloween 
night? Surely it was not because 
the ghost objected to these “natural 
beauties” occupying that part of 
the campus. 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214i/ 2 W. Capitol Street 

Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



DR. G. M. GALLOWAY 

DENTIST 

Office over Kress. Room 1. 

Cumb. Phone 2013. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 

Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoe^ Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 



DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 



408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. Gj 
One Block from Campus. O 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 



Ingrowing Nails Destroyed} 
HALL’S REMEDY^ 

Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. .Vy .SC' 

HALL DRUG COMPANy.yf 
Jackson, Miss. / , , 

^ - W 



The Jones Printing Company 



LOGAN PHIHI&S 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gen^isJ^urnisher 



DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON, MISS. 



— Sole Agent iGr^ 

deIts 



DUNLAP HATS, BOYDElT'S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



OPTOMETRY 



The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 

Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 






€be purple anD fflbitt 



€be purple anD Wfoitt 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Edltor-in-CMef 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Xocal Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland .Business Manager 

L. Gates .Asst. Business Manager 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 

L. H. Gates 
S. B. Lampton 
W. W. Moore 



Asst. Bus. Managers 



joung this being the third year are proof positive that a majority We would especially commend 
that she has been allowed to par- at least of the students of Millsaps the Honor Council to the new men 
ticipate in inter-collegiate games. ! have caught the spirit of our Honor as an institution that purports to 
Some one has said the athletic : Council and are lending it their uphold the honor and good name 
spirit at Millsaps has not always j support by conducting themselves of the students and- the College, 
been what it ought to be. This ! in a clean, gentlemanly and up- We would remind you that you 
is true because of the fact that until right manner as the spirit of the are expected to catch the spirit 
recently athletics have not been en- Honor Council would have them of the Honor Council and to hold 
couraged here, and during our do. sacred its standards and ideals, 

short history in the inter-collegiate The Honor Council stands as a We can conceive of nothing that 
circle we ha\ e been forced to rely i protection both to the student body is more thoroughly contemptible 
almost entirely on the student body and the faculty. It stands as a and despicable, and base, than for 
for encouragement and means of protection to the student body be- a student to become so thoroughly 
support. Unstinted praise is due cause it guarantees to every man devoid of honor and self-pride as 
the faculty manager of athletics that even,’ other man must stand 1 to willingly and maliciously try 
for the admirable manner in which on his merit and get his pass or his to steal on an examination. We 
he has conducted the financial end diploma in a fair, legitimate man- fail to see how a man who had ac- 
of the Association. It has been a ner. It guarantees to both stu- 
hard, laborious task for him to pro- dent bodv and faculty that any 
vide the teams with equipment and man who sinks so low as to steal 
coaches, and it is only through his on an examination or to get drunk, 
zealous watchfulness and care that has no place at Millsaps and his overwhelming him. 

he has been enabled to keep the presence will not be tolerated here. On the other hand we can think 

Association free from debt. We wash to commend most heart- 

We believe, taking into consid- ily the resolution recently passed 



quired a pass or a diploma by such 
methods could ever think of it or 
look at it without convulsions of 
shame and humiliation completely 



OUR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



To say that the students were 
elated over the announcement that 
the Jackson Alumni had taken the 
initiative in organizing a Millsaps 
Alumni Association, would be put- 
ting it mildly. Genuine whole- 
souled rejoicing greeted the an- 
nouncement that these men of the 
business world still cherish a love 
for their Alma Mater and that they 
intend to band themselves together 
for the advancement of her inter- 
ests and welfare. 

This is but the culmination of a 
long felt want and desire on the 
part of the Millsaps College author- 
ities and students. We believe that 
Millsaps College can never hope to 
reach its highest aspirations and 
dreams unless she has back of her 
the enthusiastice support of her 
Alumni but if the interest mani- 
fested by the members of the Asso- 
ciation during the past week is at 
all indicative of what the future 
has in store for us we feel perfectly 
safe along that line. 

Our College numbers among its 
Alumni some of the most promin- 
inent professional and business men 
both in the city of Jackson and 
throughout the State. That they 
are taking an active interest in 
College affairs means much to us 
in many ways. Especially is this 
true from an athletic standpoint 
since the interests of the Alumni 
are mainly centered upon bringing 
our school to the front in this 



eration the means in hand, that the 
best possible results have been ac- 
complished. At the- same time we 
realize that these means have been 
scant, and our horizon limited. 

A better day is dawning, however, 
and a new era opening. Prospects 
for winning teams are exceedingly 
bright. The awakening of the Alum- 
ni portends many desirable things — 
among them better equipments, bet- 
ter coaches, and that which is the 
culmination of these, a recognized 
position on the inter-collegiate map. 

Is it any wonder, then, that the 
students take pride and rejoice in 
the interest manifested by the 
Alumni? May this movement con- 
tinue to grow and increase until 
it shall have accomplished the fond- 
est desires and wishes of its creators. 



OUR HONOR COUNCIL. 



by the faculty to the effect that the 
decisions of the Honor Council be 
final. This means that with re- 
spect to those things which come 
under its jurisdiction, the Honor 
Council is absolutely the highest 
and predominant authority — that 
its decisions cannot be appealed 
from but must stand. This reso- 
lution, we believe, will add much 
strength to the Honor Council by 
showing the fellows, those who need 
it, that the Honor Council has the 
unqualified endorsement and sane 
tion of the College authorities. 



of no more ideal situation at Mill- 
saps College than for the sentiment 
among the students to become so 
thoroughly in sympathy with the 
ideals of the Honor Council that 
there would not even be the prob- 
ability of the Council being sub- 
jected to the unpleasant task of 
trying a student. Then, indeed, 
would our Honor Council be a 
source of just pride and Millsaps 
more than ever a college whose 
students the world would depend 
on when men who could be counted 
on to respond when appealed to 
on grounds of honor and honesty 
are wanted. 



MAGEE - HAWKINS 

i 


COMPANY 


Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 


West Jackson 


Mississippi 



No institution of Millsaps Col- J 
lege is deserving of more credit [ 
and praise or loyal and cordial sup- 
port from the student body than 
is our Honor System. Created as 
it was by the student body it is 
essentially a student’s movement. { 
It stands out before the world 
watchful and zealous of the honesty 
and integrity of the students so 
that “those who run may read” j 
the attitude of the student body 
in regard to the things over which! 
it has jurisdiction. 

The introduction of the Honor! 
Council into the School by the stu- j 
dents through their own initiative, 



and the fact that very few cases | 
respect. Speaking from an ath- have arisen for trial before it during^ 
letic standpoint, Millsaps is rather] the few years of its past history; 



Tailored Specially For You 

Every garment will be strictly hand tailored to 
your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 



Best Fit 
Best Values 



$15 Best Assortment 



Best Service 

Others at $16.50, $18, $20, $22.50, & $25 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 




Cfte purple anD Cflftite 



5 




attire and history. No great histor- 
ical character or hero in the fiction 
of the past has been discussed with- 
out taking into consideration the 
surroundings and early influences. 



tution of learning. Even in religion 
those cherished principles so dear 
to us became ours in the first place, 
many times, because they were the 
principles of our friends and asso- 



BOYS! Lome and see the JNew 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



or the view from a window, for 
those were the things that gradually 
and slowly yet persistently shaped 
and moulded the characters of men. 

An interesting allusion to liter- 
ature was the story of Charlotte 



not only had influence in 



shaping 

the early part of our life, but it 
is at work still, changing often the 
currents of our lives. Who can 
forget a mother’s loving care, even 
after we have gone from under her 



Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. Swartz Discusses “Environ- 
ment” to a Large Audience. 

The Association was much pleased 
to have Dr. M. W. Swartz, of the 
faculty, address the students and 
visitors. Dr. Swartz is a fluent 
speaker of unquestioned knowl- 
edge and pleasing personality. He 
came with an interesting discussion 
of a vital question and delighted 
his hearers with his treatment of 
the topic. 

The speaker defined his subject 
as meaning the surroundings of a 
man’s life from the mere physical 
forces of his boyhood through the 
process of mental advancement, in- 
cluding to a great extent the moral 
influences that surround his life — 
especially the earlier part of his 
life. The importance of environ- 
ment has been recognized in liter- 



Bronte. This maiden was reared 
without a mother, having only to 
{ care for her a drunken father and 
a worthless brother. Her life, a 
hard and cheerless one, was re- 
| fleeted in her writings. In contrast 
j was the story of Jane Austin, reared 
in a kindly home, loved and cher- 
ished by all. The stories .that she 
1 gave to the world were permeated 
by the atmosphere of gentleness 
and sweetness, coming, no doubt, 
from the influences of her early life. 

Again, no man can say that his 
present life and character are the 
product of present conditions. The 
forces that have shaped our des- 
tiny have been the forces existing j 
for a long time. In the field of 
politics our choice of party many 
times has been simply the choice 
of our forefathers. In education, 
our progress is determined, to a 
great extent, by forces in existence | 
before we have entered any insti- 1 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



We are told of seemingly trifling | ciates. But environment is not 

fbinrrc nir'flirar fbn Trrnlln ! i r , v i • , 



rr jjc/tson's best store, 

KeWNGTON'S 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

. 415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SEUTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 






Cfie purple attD W\ ritz 



influence, especially after she has 
passed into that great beyond ? 
Can we, so long as we have con- 
science or even memory, forget our 
mother’s kindly words, our moth- 
er’s Bible, our mother’s God? 

After discussing the importance 
of environment in shaping destiny, 
the speaker turned to another con- 
sideration of the question, namely, 
whether or not character was whol- 
ly formed by surroundings. We 
are not altogether the creatures of 
chance and circumstance. The 
human being, not by himself alone, 
but with the help of his Creator, 
can rise above his surroundings. 
This fact has been exemplified in 
the past history of every people. 
Those early converts at Rome to 
whom Paul was speaking in his 
letter to the Romans, were pressed 
down by every circumstance that 
confronted them. It was contrary 
to the will of an unprincipled em- 
peror that they should declare 
themselves as Christians. Add at 
this the daily scenes of revelry, 
wantonness and blood, when the 
chief sports were watching men and 
women die in the ampitheatre or 
gladiatorial combat with beasts 
How easy it would have been to 
drift with the tide, to say that 
chance and environment were drag- 
ging them down, that they could 
not battle against fate! But no, 
the churches of today, the millions 
of Christians, successors to those 
staunch heroes, stand as a monu- 
ment to the fact that they rose 
above their surroundings and con- 
quered the force of a hostile en- 
vironment.* 

The forces of Christianity are not 
conformative, but transformative. 
The power of Christianity has been 
that it gave to men strength to 
battle with environment and rise 
above the things that strive to 
keep them down. Some have 



thought it a part of humility to 
make no protest against evil things, 
but it is not so. Dr. Swartz brought 
out with striking force that real 
humility was not to drift with the 
tide but with firmness to fight 
the battles of life, believing that we 
can do all things “through Christ 
who strengtheneth us.” 

In connection with this the speak- 
er called attention to the many 
| things which Christians allow to 
be done contrary to the principles 
under which they live. One of the 
chief of these is disregard of the 
Sabbath. This is one of the most 
: flagrant, because it is gradually 
getting a surer hold upon the cus- 
| toms of this age. Such a thing 
could not have been done a score 
j of years ago, but here, as elsewhere, 
we become accustomed to those 
things from which we at first shrink 
in horror. 

In conclusion, Dr. Swartz called 
I to our attention again Paul’s ex- 
hortation, “Be not conformed, but I 
! be ye transformed by the renewing 
| of your mind, that you may prove 
1 what is that good, and acceptable 
and perfect will of God.” The 
speaker stated that the perfect wall 
of God was that we should make 
progress in holiness so that we make 
environment in ourselves, that will 
cause others to be blest. Further j 
that we should see that no evil 
exists, and that we exert a good 
influence and stand boldly for the 
right. Above all, God wants us to 
know that right is right everywhere, 

' that there is but one standard by 
| which men are judged. 

At the conclusion of this splendid [ 

1 address, announcements were made 
relative to the mission study classes, 
and man}- gave their names to Mr. 
McGee, Mission Study Chairman, 
to be enrolled as members of this 
class. 




COMPOSING ROOM 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., modern to the minute 
and equipped to handle every thing in printing. 



FOR - THE - YOUNG - MAN 



“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



The Great Southern Hotel 



Gulfport, Mississippi. 



THE MOST PALATITL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



Golf Bathing 

Tennis EUROPEAN Hunting 

Fishing PLAN 250 Rooms 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, ... - Manager 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable," corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
* Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptfcns just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnallv’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 









Cbe Purple anD OTite 



Arrow 

Kotch COLLARS 

THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2 H in. BELMONT 2H In. 
MEDORA 2H in. CHESTER 2 in. 

2 for ?5 ct». C' UETT, PEAQOOY A CO., Makers 

Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

"Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath, 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with hath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



LOCALS. 

Mr. McClesky, of Brookhaven, 
who graduated here in 1900, visited 
Kappa Sigma friends Tuesday and ; 
Wednesday of last week. 

Mr. Grady Lassiter, of McHenry, | 
Miss., spent the latter part of last 
week with his brother, Harry. 

It is reported that R. W. Jones 
' is taking anti-feet. 

— 

Rev. W. W. Woolard, of the 
Board of Trustees, visited his son, 
W. F. Woolard, last week. 

Dr. Swartz (in Latin Class) — Has 
the bell rtmg ? 

Mr. Bell (thoughtlessly) — I am 
here, Doctor. 

Spooks and goblins were plenti- 
ful on the campus last Thursday 
| night and from the way the fumi- 
' ture in the chapel was scattered we 
are quite sure they left more of 
their stunts unfinished. 

Hillman — Since the solar system 
is so closely connected, why don’t ! 
we have a telephone to the moon ? 
Mr. Bingham — Why, that's a fool- 
1 ish question. Don’t you know we 
haven’t anything to ram the post 



For information concerning the j 
“Calomel Twins” see “Ot” Broom- 
field or “Jack” Jackson; or perhaps 
“Fatty” McLean could give you 
the desired information. 

Who was the Freshman that was 
so anxious to get his girl in the 
“Squeezer” that he paid the keeper 
twenty dollars for two tickets? 

Have T. B. Doxey do your tai- 
I loring and save the special discount 

| he gives the College boys. 

1 1 

W. W. Moore, one of the effic- 
ient Sophomores, produced some 1 
I “kinkering” arguments before the 
| Galloway Society Friday night. 

It is reported that Dr. Sullivan 
1 is seriously contemplating boring 
a well in the laboratory so that the 
laboratory students may have a ) 
plenty of water to test. 

Miss Steen (declining an Anglo- ! 
Saxon verb, while looking at one j 
I member of the class) — Writan, 
Wrot, Wroten. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 

A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLFS ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 

Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 

MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



ATTEND THE BEST 



HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The Only Business University in the South 

We have no branch schools and devote our 
ENTIRE time to ONE INSTITUTION which 
POSITIVELY enables us to give our students 
the CREAM of Business Training. 



We are as good as the best, 

And are better than all the rest. 



WE MAKE HIGH GRADE ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS 
AND KINDS. 

Our collections of individuals include fruits, flowers, figures 
and designs suitable for any occasion. 

Brick and Neapolitan we make in any combination of flavors 
and colors desired. 

Write us what you want and when you want it to arrive and, 
we will do the rest. 

CARLOSS ICE COMPANY 



(INCORPORATED) 

Manufacturers of ICE AND ICE CREAM. 



JACKSON, 



MISSISSIPPI. 




8 



€be purple anD fflbite 



CANDIES 



j Hip! Hip! Hurrah! H-o-l-i-d-a-y. 

^AGENCY JuLl a^CANDIES^ ^ et ’ S SWear , fr °” ***** * or ever 

N. sS' and ever — until April Fool s Day. 

Well, did you see Wood-row across I 
BOXES AT the river? 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

Talbert — I always have to ele- 1 

CORNER DRUG STORE vate my feet when I am studying. 

! Judge Blount — You do that in or- 



Capitol and Farish Sts. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 



der to elevate your mind. 

If Miss Watkins should faint 
would A. B. Holder? 

Weems says the Fair certainly 
j was bad on lips. Wonder what he 
(means by that? 

Hathome (to young lady) — Say, 
it wouldn’t take much for a girl 
j like you to make a fool of me. 

Young Lady — Really, now, would 
it take anything ? 



' I Up Tnooprv ^ r - Sullivan (in Chemistry class) 

^ ''oo'^V — Mr. Herbert will you please, 

Royal Hotel Building. go out in the yard and get some- 

thing green to try this bleaching 

S. P. McRAE ag “ t? 

Herbert — How would a couple ) 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 0 f Freshmen do, Doctor? 

Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard Tr ’ ” 

Young Lady — You know I get 

& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle awful lonesome. I wish I had a sis- 



S. P. McRAE 



Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 

214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 



ter or some one to keep me com- 
pany. 

P. C. McNeill (gallantly) — How 
would a husbnad do? 



W. F. WEST 

Practical 
Merchant 
T ailor 



124 W. Capitol St. New Phone 583 

Messina New Bldg. Upstairs 



Jackson 



:-s Mississippi 



DRINK CARBONATED 



IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 



Coca-Cola Bottiing Co. 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Prof. Huddleston (in class, to 
the Prep, who distributed peanut 
hulls under the desk) — All that 

you lack now is a snout and a tail. 
— 

Ask Bingham if he lost anything 
on South Street. 

Chat and Darrington Phillips 
have just returned from a short 
visit to their home in Belle Prairie. 

“Juicy” Mansell made a short 
■ trip home last week. 

The Senior Class of the Prepara- 
tory School, was organized Thurs- 
day and the following officers were 
.elected : 

President — Clegg. 

Vice-President — Bufkin. 

Sec. and Treas. — Miss Elizabeth 
Watkins. 

Orator — Clegg. 

Poet — Wooten. 

Sport — Waller. 

. Liar — Wheeler. 

Ugliest — L. H. Yates. 

Prophet — Pearman . 

Historian — Spinks . 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$5.00 o I muwcnw ti,e bi,: 

in all the new W. J. J U II ll U U I, ^ 8n| l 
Fall Styles COMPANY to 15 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 



Standard of Perfection. 



PRICE 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 



$15 to $ 25.00 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 








QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 




Voi. v. 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1912. 


No. 7. 



FOOTBALL GAME. 

Fresh-Soph Team Win on Fumble, 
2-0 — Preps Outplay College 

Boys at Almost Every Stage of 
the Game. 



One of the most exciting foot- 
ball games ever witnessed was 
played last Friday afternoon be- 
tween the Fresh-Soph and Prep 
teams. Although the Fresh-Sophs 
managed to win, by a narrow 
margin of two points, it was any- 
body’s game until the last quar- 
ter was over. 

The game in detail is as fol- 
lows : 

First Quarter — Taylor kicks to 
Jackson, who returns ten yards. 
F. P. to Watkins for twenty yds. 
McLain around left end for one 
yd. Incomplete F. P. Gaddis 
loses one yd. in criss-cross. Gad- 
dis kicks for twenty yds. and Tay- 
lor recovers the ball. Taylor four 
yds. around end. Holder two yds. 
around end. Holder F. P. and 
Cassibry recovers the ball. In- 
complete F. P. Gaddis around 
left end for twelve yds. Cassibry 
around right end for fourteen 
yds. Preps break through and 
throw Cassibry for a loss of eight 
yds. Incomplete F. P. Cassibry 
around left end for nine yds. 
Preps hold for downs and ball 
goes over. Holder goes around 
jhe end for fifteen yds. but 
loses the ball to Hendrix on a 
fumble. Hathorn aver right end 
for six yds. Gaddis makes five 
yds. on a criss-cross. Incomplete 
F. P. Time up. Ball in Preps’ 
territory. Fresh-Soph outplay 
the Preps, but are unable to score. 
First quarter, score 0 to 0. 

Second Quarter — Ball on Preps 
twenty-eight yd. line in Prep- 
Soph possession. Gaddis around 
left end for one yd. Hathorn over 
right end for five yds. Gaddis 
around left end for six yds. Mc- 
Lain over left end for nine yds. 
Cassibry around left end for five 
yds. McLain over left end. no 
(Continued on page 2) 



| 

Students Grant Faculty Holiday 




Great Demonstration Over Wilson’s Election 
—High School Joins in Parade Over City 
-Much Enthusiasm Manifested and a 
Great Crowd Attracted. 


— 

_ 



COLLEGE ORCHESTRA OR- 
GANIZED. 

Success of Movement Demon- 
strated — Eleven Pieces — More to 
Come — Logue Leader. 



Rejoicing over the great victory the Democrats won last Tuesday 
was so general on the campus that the students thought there ought 
to be a holiday and, as the majority rules, there was one. A great 
! time they had, too. In fact, it was a great day, as anyone who was in 
| that parade can attest. 

The student body in full force marched from the college chapel 
over to the Prep school, where they were joined by the Preps. The 
marshals of the day formed the whole body into line two and two. 
Thus arranged they set out for Belhaven, for the purpose of giving 
the girls a yell or two for Wilson — and Belhaven. A grand line that 
was that marched over there, too, reaching almost from State street 
to Belhaven. Having arrived here, they gave the girls some yells 
such as they had never heard before. 

From Belhaven they marched down State street, picking up 
| recruits on tjie way. The crowd stopped at the Daily News office 
I and gave several rousing cheers for Wilson and Democracy. At 
1 Hunter & McGee’s they were treated to cigars and drinks. Having 
tarried here awhile to express their appreciation and approval of 
the generosity of this firm, they proceeded to the High School, 
stopping on their way there at the Capital National Bank to give a 
cheer for Major Millsaps. 

At the High School they received a jvarm welcome. It was soon 
! evident that the High School students also are highly patriotic and 
j excited over the Democratic landslide. In short, they soon decided 
to cast their lot* with the Millsapers and join the parade. 

From here, supplied with gloving banners and blowing horns, 
i the line proceeded to the State eapitol. Here they were addressed 
| by Prof. J. N. Powers. State Superintendent of Education. Prof. 
Powers made only a short talk, but it was filled with patriotic and 
acute remarks. 

With their ranks filled by the great number from the High 
School, the assembly had, indeed, become a small army. Marching 
down Capitol street from the eapitol. the enthusiastic band excited 
a great deal of attention. Business men of the city began to fall in 
line with them and urged them to go to Poindexter school and get 
| the students there. Several stops on the way there were made, one 
to get a picture made at Daniels’ studio. 

Arrived at Poindexter school, it took only a few minutes to in- 
! duee the students there to join the happy party. Marching back up 
! Capitol street, they had what many said was one of the biggest 
crowds ever seen in Jackson. 

That was a grand march from the depot up Capitol, thence up 
State street to Millsaps. The crowd stopped at the postoffice to pay | 
their respects to the big men of the town, giving them yells, etc. j 
Thence this great crowd marched on to Millsaps, where in front of 
the President ’s home they gave him cheer after cheer. 



‘At this the student body rose 
and cheered until the college or- 
chestra began to play.” This is 
a sentence taken from the Daily 
News’ writeup of the athletic 
meeting at chapel last week. Some 
college spirit there, eh? That 
talk about the orchestra sounds 
kinder good too, does it not ? The 
college spirit was there all right. 
{ Likewise the orchestra. 

This latter is accounted one of 
the most valuable additions that 
! the college has received for some 
time past. Its organization is 
I due to the untiring efforts of our 
| efficient instructor and vice- 
j president. Dr. J. M. Sullivan. It 
i was at first organized for Dr. Sul- 
livan’s Sunday School clqss, but 
has grown to its present position 
of eminence as the college or- 
chestra. 

The orchestra is more than for- 
tunate in having as its leader and 
instructor U. F. Logue — himself a 
past master as a violinist and a 
man of remarkable musical talent 
and leamrag. 

The other members of the or- 
chestra are likewise demonstrat- 
ing that they are capable musi- 
cians. No prophecy as to the re- 
sults of this organization would 
be in order. They have already 
demonstrated the fact that it is a 
great success. The music fur- 
nished in chapel the other morn- 
ing added much to the occasion, 
and we do not hesitate to say that 
the orchestra will be “right there 
with the goods” on every occa- 
sion where expressions of college 
spirit and pride are needed. The 
orchestra consists of the follow- 
ing: Logue, violin, leader; Per- 

ry. violin ; Sterling, violin ; Con- 
drev, comet; Bending, comet; 
Russel, comet ; Penn, horn ■ Miss 
Sue Bess Sullivan, violin; Cassi- 
bry. dram; Greenway, trombone ; 
Miss Spickard. piano. 




2 



€be purple anO COfme 



College Directory 



C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Rav 
R. I. Jolly 

-Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 
J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 
Galloway Speakers. 



COLLEGE FACULTY. J B Kirkland 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President Triangular Debaters 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary Galloway Speakers. 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer W. E. Morse.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

FRATERNITIES. R - H. Harmon 

Kappa Alpha. K - M- Broom 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary Mid-Session Debaters 

Kappa Sigma. W. W. Moore 

N. F. Harmon Secretary R. C. Edwards 

Pi Kappa Alpha. Commencement Debaters 

B. F. Foster Secretary x B Harmon 

Phi Delta. j g H. Frazier 

J. R. Gathings ... . Secretary Triangular Debaters 

Sigma Upsilon. . 

A. A. Kern Secretary , Q _ . Tennis Club. 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. “ Lampton President 

S. B. Lampton Secretary ' ' ‘ ' Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Kappa Mu. Prep Athletic Association. - 

Miss Mary Shurlds.._ Secretary ; J - R - Spinks President 

Phi Zeta. | A. B. Holder Vice President 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary I S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

Preparatory School. | A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master R . H. Gates Football Manager 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron R - E. Whitson Track Manager 

Y. M. C. A. w - M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

D. J. Savage President SCIENCE CLUB. 

F. T. Scott Vice President H. H. Lester President ; 

R. E. Selby Secretary S. B. Lampton vice President ! 

W. S. Burns Treasurer H. F. Magee Secretary 

Athletic Association. PUBLICATIONS. 

F. T. Scott President | Purple and White. 

S. L. Crockett Vice President ( H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer | J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager Bobashela. 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager ! F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager j. t. Weems (Chairman) 

N. F. Harmon — Track Manager | s. B. Lampton „ . 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. J H. F. Magee Business Managers 

Lamar. — - - — 

W. B. Montgomery President (Continued from page 1) 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President . 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer j gain. Gaddis through line for 

Bob Sterling Secretary one yd This being the fourth 

D. J. Savage President ■ down, the ball went over. 

T. C. Willingham Vice President! m t> t 

C. Bullock Treasurer K R t0 Holder for twelve yds. 

T. L. Carraway . Secretary Holder around right end for two 

N. Golding T. ** President ^ ds - Cle gg over lef t end for five 

C. W. Alford Vice President yds. Tavlor around right end for ! 

L. H. Gates Treasurer three - yds - Holder around right 

CLASSES. end for six yds. Gates fails to 

S. B. Lampton President through line. Taylor around 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President i right end for two yds. Holder 

W. I M. T^asiw^ over left end for four >’ ds - Hold - 1 

Junior. j er over right end for three yds. j 

D. J. Savage President Gates tries throufrh line hut no 

T. M. Cooper Vice President uirougn line, out no 

I. W. Howe Secretary gain. Holder around right end. 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer no g a j n Holder through line for 

R. H. Harmon President "'’e . vds - Time up. The Preps 

K. M. Broom Vice President outplay the Fresh-Soph. Thev 

C. Bullock Secretary , ,, . , ,, „ . „ 

G. W. Harrison : Treasurer 1 brought the ball from their four I 



freshman. yd. line to the middle of the field. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt c, 0 to (1 

J. N. McNeil Vice President * coie - u TO u - 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary Third Quarter — Gaddis kicks 

T. L. Bailey President ° ff aU(1 the Pre P s return the bal1 

J. A. Blount Vice President to middle of field. Taylor over 

Ft Thompson 67 7 Trels.mer ri g ht end for three yds. Gates 

millsaps representatives. unable to go through line. Hold- 

J. T. Weems. er over end i° r eight yds. 

Triangular Debaters. Tavlor around right end for four 

Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters . ,, ... „ 

R. E. Selby. y ds - Gates through line for two 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters yds. Clegg through line, no gain. 
J. B. Kirkland. ‘ , 

Lamar Speakers. Holder over left end for two yds. 

H. H. Boswell. — Anniversarian Tavlor over left end, no gain. 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator „ , . , , . ° . 

J. T. Weems..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater Preps penalized for being offside. 

?' tr' V ™!! a . ms ' Jr ' Gates through line for two vds. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters Tavlor over right end for three 



(«^) 



This Space Reserved For 

NYE WILSON 






NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 



yds. Holder over left end for i Kirkland over left end for one yd. 
three yds. Taylor then tries to i Gaddis kicks and Taylor makes a 
drop kick from the twenty -yd. j fair catch. Time up. Score, 0 
line, but fails. to 0. 

The ball now in Fresh-Soph pos- Fourth Quarter — Ball on Preps 
session. Kirkland around left fifteen-yd. line and in their pos- 
end for twenty yds. Kirkland j session. Holder around right end 
over right end. no gain. Cassibry for three yds. The center passes 
around right end for eight yds. ! the ball to Taylor, who fumbles 




Cbe purple anD ZClbi tc 





Center 




McLain 


R. G. 


Willingham 


Hendrix 


L. G. 


Holmes 


O ’Donald 


R. T. 


Johnson 


Blewett 


L. T. 


Hill 


Jackson 


R. E. 


Ely 


W atkins 


L. E. 


Pearman 


Capps 


R. H. B. 


Golden 


Hathorn 


H. B. 


Cleggs 


Kirkland and McLain Taylor 


1 j 


F. B. 




1 Gaddis 


Q. B. 


Gates j 


Cassibry 




Holder ! 


Summary : 


Touchdown, 0. Safe- 


ty. Taylor. 


Referee, 


Kern. Um- 


pire. Burton. 


Head-linesman, No- 



it and it rolls behind the line, to Holder for six yds. Taylor 

Kirkland tackled Taylor behind kicks and Cassibry recovers the 

the line for a safety. The ball ball. Time up. Ball on Fresh- 

is then brought back to the eigli- Soph five-yd. line. Score : FTesh- 

teen-vd. line. Holder over right Soph 2. Preps 0. 

end for three yds. Gates gets Fresh-Soph. Preps. 

through the line and runs for six- Center 

ty yds. He was going for a touch- McLain Willingham 

down, but Kirkland overtook him. R. C. 

Gates through line for seven yds. Hendrix Holmes 

Taylor over right end for two yds. L. G. 

Holder is held, no gain. Gates O'Donald .Johnson 

through line, no gain. Holder R. T. 

fumbles and loses ball. Gaddis Blewett Hill 

kicks out to the forty-yd. line. L. T. 

Holder through line, no gain. Jackson Ely 

Hendrix breaks through and R. E. 

throws Holder for a loss. F. P. Watkins Pearman 



'WWociEry 
j wmjpiAis & 
(ig| emblems 

Hyl WE CARRY IN 

fiiP n\E K FULL 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 

RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 

SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

1ACKS0N 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



DIRECTORY 



ble. Time-keeper. Boswell. Time, 
of quarters. 10-8. 

GALLOWAY LITERARY SO- 
CIETY. 

Weekly Flood of Oratory Turned 
Loose — Kirkpatrick Declaims — 
Good Attendance. 

One of the largest crowds of 
the year assembled in the Gallo- 
way hall for the regular session 
Friday night. Pres. Savage 
sounded the gavel at promptly 
eight o’clock ~ and at once the 
house assumed a business air. 
Kirkpatrick, the declaimer, de- 
livered an excellent oration. 
Weems, from the Lamar Society, 
was present and responded to the 
call for an oration. 

The question for debate was, 
“Resolved. that Congressmen 
should be elected from the State 
at large.” The affirmative was 
represented by Clarke. R. G. 
Moore and Howe, and the nega- j 
tive by N. Harmon. Hawthorne J 
and Barrett. The question was 
decided in favor of the negative. 

The Tatom Twins and Gallo- 
way were welcomed into the so- 
eietv as new members. 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 

DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson. Miss. 

T. H. GOTTEN 

DENTIST 

•214J/2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 

DR. G. M. GALLOWAY 

DENTIST 

Office over Kress. Room 1. 

Cumb. Phone 2013. 

DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices. Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 



The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

103 North State St. JACKSON. MISS - 



OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON. MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly.* 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 

Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

I)R. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 



LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN'S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 

Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, RAH, 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE HAH. HAH, HAH. 

Show your College spirit by decorating your room with Pennants, 
Posters and Pillows. Wear the "M” Armlets, Belts and Pins. 
Call and see our Fountain Pens, Pencils and Stationery. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

John W. Chisolm, Manager 



Ask Savage about his parlia- 
mentarv bobble. 



BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 




€bc purple anD Q3jm t 



Cbe Purple anD G3l)ite lege man is the man of the hour, with interest from beginning to j better man could not have been 
. It is a demonstration of the end. Vice-President Honeycutt elected than Magee. 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



truth that the student and the I was in the chair. 



Kirkland was appointed as a 



college man are no longer looked The declamation and oration committee of one to attend to all 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief ' upon as a recluse possessed of were dispensed with, owing to matters of printing, etc. 

F. T. Scott.. ---------------- -Associate Editor strange and fruitless ideas — one | the fact that both the declaimer After Holloman had been elect- 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor , ... . , • , , , . , , „ , „ 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor dwelling apart from his fellows ! and orator tor the occasion were ed monthly orator and a final roll 



G. H. Moore Special Reporter and n0 Ya l U e either as a citizen absent. 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor or as a soldier, but that more and i The 



The question for debate. 



call had been taken the meeting 
• Re- was adjourned. 



Editor more ^cry day is the wo rid look- so i ved) that the English parlia- .< Prep „ Nobles . head . mast er 
j. B. Kirkland Business Manager ing to the colleges for the men m ent is more suited to a democ- Lj p rep Department enter- 
ic H. Gates to head her various political and ! ,-aev than the American Con T, ! . 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers ..... 1 ; '-• y man me American eon tamed the football team at a ban- 



L. H. Gates 



financial institutions 



W. W. Moore financial institutions. gress, ” was next taken up. Speak- 1 , ast Saturday night. De- 

Matter intended for publication We rejoice with the Democrats e rs for the affirmative, Scott and | i:„i lt f n i vefreshmentc con«i«timr 
touid be addressed to the Editor-in- • . ’ , _____ hghttul refreshments, consisting 



Ch°ef d a b n e d a mu7tTe d in hte handTbl' “ overwhelming election of j Magee, made some good argu- flf grape juice> cream and f ru its, 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. j President V llson. and rejoice ments that showed they were well w served Many toasts were 

All business communications should likewise in the place of leader- qualified to discuss this Question • , , , 

be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business ... , . , , ,, u u lo uls '- u * s> uus (juesuun, given and all present had a most 

Manager. _ , ship into which the college men and that they had given it no deli htful time . Those present 

Entered as second class matter, of today are coming, of which the ! little time and preparation. Their Afoccra vr n u lo(I fintes Hold 

Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 1 ,• « nyj * j« . . . wero M6S8rs. INOD16S, vjates, HOlu 

son. Miss., under act of Congress, election of Wilson is symbolic. arguments were such that those er willin£rham _ Johnson. Holmes. 

March 3, 1879. of Blewett and Kirkland, for the rjnldinsr Pearman Tav- 

One year's subscription $1.50 As th e Purple and V lute goes ne g at j ve cou l d n0 f disprove their , rl ’ Tv...:- firoen Tneker 



mue time ana preparation, tneir were Mesgrs NobleSi Gates , Ho i d . 
arguments were such that those er willingham) Johnson, Holmes. 



March 3, 1879. of Blewett and Kirkland, for the f} o i d ; n0 . Pearman Tav- 

One year's subscription $1.50 As the Pur P le and W hlte S oes negative, could not disprove their , ’ q _ Davis Green Tucker 

Extra ^opies^to ^ “T" C ° meS *° Points. The Judges, after con- and wi ^ ms ’ 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 struggle between the students s j der ing bo th sides of the ques- 

THE COLLEGE MAN IN POLL “uld' White TZZ™' T "’" 5 * he d “ isi °” *° ,hC Aftw »“■ i,s "" Iit,le thto «’ 1 
■ e r-uipie anu vvmie is I1UL I affirmative. . lifd that count Now who won 



TICS. 



1“ playing favorites” by assuming I 
which side is in the wrong. We 



J oily ’s resignation 



I life that count. Now, who would 
as com- j ever have imagined that a little 



w ., mencement debater was received thing like Wilson being elected 

The election of Woodrow Wil- merely pause to say that regard-! , , , . . „ , 

, land accepted at this meeting. Ma- ; would have any influence on such 

son to the Presidency ot the less of where the trouble lies we, _ I , .. ... 

. „ ■ , • , pi,„p gee was elected in his place. From a great question as a college holi- 

United States is of special inter- regret that this condition of af - ,, . , . . F e . 1 

, . „ . • . ; ■ • I all the talent m the society, a dav? 



est to college students for many j fairs should exist in our sister in- 
reasons stitution and hope for them a 



reasons ouiuuuu auu H’ 

In the first place it was a con- fair and satisfactory ad- 

test in some respects between justment °f same 
three of the leading institutions 
of the country — that is, between Prof. Lin left 



Prof. Lin left Tuesdav 



Wilson of Princeton, Taft of Yale for Spartanburg. S. C., where he 
and Roosevelt of Harvard. g° es as a representative of the 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



11 is SlgUUlV/OUl nut l/uut 

the three leading candidates ciatiou of Colleges and prepara- 
should be enthusiastic alumni of tor - v Schools of the Southern 
these institutions, but that Wilson States ' Man - V educators of note 
-the president of a college and frora throughout the South were 

one of the leading educators of 0D the P r0 ^ ram and a ^ reat con ' 

the day, a man who until within ference was hald ' Tt is of s P ecMal 
. .. , , „ interest to Millsaps students that 

the past tew years has been r 

■ alillsaps was voted a member ot 
practically unknown in the poiiti- 1 

, ij u u i l. fhe Association at this meeting 

eal world — should be chosen to . .... 7 

.. The University of Mississippi is 

fill this the highest otfice in the • 



MAGEE - HAWKINS 


COMPANY 


Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 


West Jackson 


Mississippi 



.... , .. , . , also a member and was repre- 

gitt of the American people. 

. . sented at the conference. 

Yet we cannot say that this is 

not in keeping with the advance- The Prineetonian turned out to 

ment and educational progress of b) , some prince eh^ 

the age. There was a time when 

men could boast that they were LAMAR SOCIETY. 

self-made men — that they had 

never been to college, and yet Political Question Decided in Fa- 
thev had risen to heights of emi- vor of Affirmative — Magee 

nence and places of responsibil- Elected Commencement De- 



The Prineetonian turned out to j 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



ity. This time has passed. The 
college man. armed with greater 
training and mental capacities, is 



hater. 



The Lamar Literarv Society 



forging to the front, and the elec- held last Friday night one of the 
tion of Wilson to the Presidency best meetings of the session. The 
is but a demonstration of the question for debate was a good 
truth of the assertion that the eol- one and the meeting was replete 



Tailored Specially For You 

Every garment will be strictly hand tailored to 
your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 



Best Fit 
Best Values 



^ | ^ Best Assortment 
A Best Service 



Others al $16.50, SI8, $20, $22.50, & S25 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 





LOCAL NEWS 



Hurrah, for the two Presidents. 
Watkins and Wilson! 



Hobbs is still cutting hair. 
Shack 4. 



Miss McGehee (conjugating 
English verb): “Go, gold, done 

gone.” 



Freshman to Prep: “What 

did Woodrow Wilson do. any- 
way?” 

“Juicy” Mansell’s brother 
spent several days with him last 
week. 



C. E. and F. H. Fant received 
a short visit from their father 
last week. 



If you haven ’t subscribed for a 
calendar, do so at once. It’s go- 
ing to be some calendar, and well 
worth keeping. 



Paul Greenway left Saturday 
morning for a short visit to his 
home in Ridgeland. 



Maxwell Lambert, of Sardis, 
visited friends on the campus sev- 
eral days last week. 



Have T. B. Doxey do your Tai- 
loring and save the discount he 
gives the college boys. 



Fall in line and get you one of 
those striped, barbershop jackets; 
they are all the go now. 



It is a source of great regret 
to the editors of the Purple and 
White that in the writeup of the 
election of the Bobashela stalf, 
the name of W. E. Morse, as ath- 
letic editor was through some 
strange oversight, omitted. Morse, 
both from an athletic and liter- 
ary' standpoint is well fitted for 
the position. He has made prac- 
tically every' team in school and 
has held important positions on 
the staff of the college publica- 
tions — both of which make him a 
valuable addition to the staff. 



Miss McGehee says Miss Steen 
is getting to be a regular philoso- 
pher. We wonder what she has 
been philosophizing on. 

A great multitude of the stu-| 
dent body' spake, “Let there be 



€fre purple anO cafnte 



5 



a holiday. ’ ’ and the morning and 
evening was a holiday. 



On last Friday afternoon de- 
licious refreshments were served 
at table No. 1 in physical lab- 
oratory by* Junior co-eds. 



It is strange why Senator Tal- 
bot smiles every' time he sees a 
certain co-ed. He has a fondness 
to ramble by the Lin-field. 

If you like to read the Purple 
j and White, get one every Friday 
I morning at chapel. If you get it. 

| consider yourself a subscriber. 



Apply yourself well ; get up 
your daily recitations. “An 
ounce of preparation is worth a 
pound of cramnation.” Savy? 

What’s in a name? The Fresh- 
man by any other name would get 
his hair cut just the same. “Fresh- 
man. beware the ides of Decem- 



We wonder why Dr. Kern did 
not grade Mr. Harris’ note-book. 
Probably, he would have to take 
j a course in short-hand next sum- 
mer. 



Some one has suggested that 
the McNeill twins tie pink and 
blue pieees of ribbon around their 
necks so the co-eds can tell them 
apart. 



Prof. Lin (calling roll in eco- 
nomics class): “Mr. Honey cutte 

is absent?” 

ilr. Harmon: “Yes. Honey'— 

cutte today.” 



Dr. Sullivan (in Sophomore 
chemistry class): “Give an ex- 

ample of a physical change.” 

Sophomore: “Frozen ice is 

one. isn’t it Doctor?” 

Miss McGehee (looking at the 
well diggers) : “What are they 

doing?” 

Mr. Crisler: “Putting up a 

squeezer.” 

Some Freshman has defined a 
magician as “something on the 
order of a detective.” As evi- 
dence of this truth he offers the 
discovery by Magician Hurd (not 
the Freshman) of the number of 
playdng cards, etc., on the person 
of our President at the perform 
ance Wednesday night. 

“Now. Dr. . Really .” 




| 

{ 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 



of other good things to wear at 



Jjr JACKSON'S BEST STORE. 

Kenningtons 




BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Waikins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 





6 



€t)c purple anD ca&ite 



Miss Steen : “I wonder why 

Mr. Hutton didn’t hand in an au- 
tobiography in English.” 

Miss Harris: ' He wasn’t big 

enough to have one. I guess.” 



Miss Edmond (after reading 
notice to Freshmen in Purple and 
White to have their hair cut) : 
“0. are they really going to cut 
the Freshman co-ed’s hair?” 



We were glad to have all mem- 
bers of the law class attend chapel 
exercises Wednesday morning, 
and especially did we enjoy Mr. 
Bailey’s talk. We hope to have 
them often. 



Misses Allene Harmon, Ella 
Kate Steen, Pattie W. Sullivan, 
Sue B. Sullivan. Elizabeth Wat- 
kins. Olive Watkins and Evelyn 
Spickard were recently initiated 
into the Phi Zeta Sorority. 



The editors of the Purple' and 
White have received a personal 
letter from President Wilson 
thanking them for having elected 
him to the Presidency. “That's 
all right, Woodrow; don’t men- 
tion it.” 



Frazier: ‘"The Sullivan girls 

have dates for the rest of the 
year with the Preps.” 

Harmon: ‘‘That ruins me.” 

Johnson: “Can’t you break a 

date with a Prep?” 



X. T. Steward (“Tip”), a for- 
mer student of this college, and 
now a progressive business man 
in the little city of Morton, Miss., 
spent several days of last week 
upon the campus visiting old 
friends. 



Miss Steen: “Professor, don’t 

you think we should have a holi- 
day if Wilson is elected.” 

Prof. Lin: “1 can’t see it in 

that way. (Miss Steen.” 

Miss Steen: “0 well, 1 see the 

reason why. You haven’t your 
glasses on today.” 

“Prep” Hathorne (over tele- 
phone): “Dr. Sullivan. 1 want 

to officially announce to you that 
there will not be any school to- 
day.” 

Dr. Sullivan: “I want to of- 

ficially tell you that I don’t give 
a flip.” 

•lodge Blount left Saturday 
night for northern Mississippi, 
where he is to join a party of 
Mississippi and Northern hunters 
in an annual bear hunt in the 
swamps of Tallahatchie county. 
The Judge has r'^ yet returned 
to relate his experiences, but no 
doubt he will return burdened 
with many perfectly new bear 
and “dear” tales with which to 
amaze ( ?) his listeners. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Interesting and Helpful Talks by 
Members of Student Body. 



Dr. Swartz announced to his I'he W M. C. A. met on Friday 
Freshman Latin class that there night with a program quite va- 
would not be any more recitations r >ed from the usual, but all the 
in Latin until Wilson was elected, more interesting for that cause. 
No wonder the Freshmen prayed The W M. C. A. congratulates the 
for a Republican victory — we chairmen of the devotional com- 
don’t blame them. mittee on the excellent speakers 




STEREOTYPING DEPARTMENT 



FOR - THE - YOUNG - MAN 



“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



The Great Southern Hotel 

Gulfport, Mississippi. 



THE MOST PALATITL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



Golf Bathing 

Tennis EUROPEAN Hunting 

Fishing PLAN 250 Rooms 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, - - - - Manager 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” comer Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the ijest and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
. Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These < ’andies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., a complete plant 
making metal olates of every description. 




€ f)E Purple anO mWt 



whom he has secured from the 
faculty and the churches of the 
city. But when we have the priv- 
ilege of hearing members from 
our own ranks, men who are 
neither so brilliant, nor learned, 
nor experienced, but men who are 
facing the real problems of col- 
lege life and fighting the same 
battles which we must fight, then 
it is but natural that we feel es- 
pecial interest in this service. 

The interest of the program was 
greatly enhanced by Dr. Kern, 
who brought his Yictrola and 
played a number of new sacred 
records. The Association is 
deeply indebted to Dr. Kern for 
his untiring interest in its work 
and his efforts in behalf of its ! 
services. 

began with the j 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 



JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



Kotch COLLARS 



THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2 H In. BELMONT 2K In. 

MEDORA 2*4 In. CHESTER 2 In. 

2 for 25 Ct». C UETT, PEABODY A CO., Makers 



Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



1 he program 
record “Ave Maria,” by Eliza- 
beth Wheeler, followed by ‘‘1 
Heard the Voice of Jesus Say ” 
by Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler. Then 
the audience were delighted with 
that splendid solo by Frank Stan- 
ley, Tennyson’s ‘‘Crossing the 
Bar;” also with ‘’The Great 
Camp Meeting,” by the Fisk Quar- 
tette. 

At this time. Mr. Weems, the 

took 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show YOU 



leader tor this occasion, 
charge and explained the general 
outline of the service, stating 
that there would be three short 
talks on the subject of “Prayer.” 
It was regretted that the fourth 
speaker. Mr. Selby, was away on 
account of the illness of his fa- 
ther. In discussion of his sub- 
ject Mr. Weems defined prayer 
as a communication between God 
and man, as the language not al- 
together. in fact but very little, 
the language of the lips but the 
language of a soul as it is loosed 
from the material world and 
swings out to meet the spirit of 
its Maker. The issue was raised 
as to whether or not prayer was 
all-powerful. whether man 
through the medium of prayer 
could reach so far that he would 
change the will of the Divine. The j 
t was inclined to take the 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

.A. v. SE UTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 



WE MAKE HIGH GRADE ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS 
AND KINDS. 

Our collections of individuals include fruits, flowers, figures 
and designs suitable for any occasion. 

Brick and Neapolitan we make in any combination of flavors 
and colors desired. 

Write us what you want and when you want it to arrive and 
we will do the rest. 



THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 



“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two o. uuro persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



speake 

rather common-sense view that as 
a finite being man could reabh 
only so far; that God in His won- 
derful wisdom and power not only 
supplied the needs of humanity 
but even to a very great extent 
determined what those needs 
were. Man is inclined to be a 
selfish being and his wants are 
quite often for those things of 



CARLOSS ICE COMPANY 



(INCORPORATED) 

Manufacturers of ICE AND ICE CREAM. 



MISSISSIPPI. 



JACKSON, 




8 



€bc purple ano mbitt 



Afirwrv 



c Awnir^ 




BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 



which lie really has no need. The] 
spirit which God wishes us to J 
have is expressed in the greatest J 
model of prayer that he has left j 
us, “Thv will, not mine, be done.”' 

In the interval before the next 
speaker. Dr. Kern gave three de- 



CORNER DRUG STORE lightful records: “ Abide with 

Me,” bv Richard Jose: “I’m the 



Capitol and Farish Sts. Child of a King,” by Elizabeth J 

Wheeler.” and the “Balm of Gil- 

I ^ ead.” bv the Fisk Quartette. 

Now is the Time The chairman then introduced j 

< the next speaker, Mr. Melvin ! 
To DUJ > OUT ball Suit. Johnson, one of the most forceful 

Let us have your meas- spea kers and popular men among 

ure. YN e sell the underclassmen. Johnson spoke 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES a few well-chosen words on 

the Greatest yet. |" F, ? h ” b ™f" 8 ° ut with . 

mg torce that uot so much de- 

College Boys Always P ended 011 the words of P ra y e1 ' 

Welcome at our Place. ' !; s ° n , the att ! tude / ra - v f 

raith is not only a belief in the 

’T’L T^aaprv things for which we ask but the 

*■ *"*'■' J very atmosphere in which we j 

Royal Hotel Building. pray and the only connecting link I 

- ■ between God and man. Faith is I 

S P McRAE an esserbda l part of the material 

world. Without it. business could I 
Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson no t be carried on, the foundations 

Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard of society would totter and fall— 

and the home life without a be- j 

& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle lief in its purity would be de . 

Brand Collars. Ides’ Shirts. stroyed. 



S. P. McRAE 



Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 
214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 

W. F. WEST 



Practical 
Merchant 
T ailor 

124 W. Capitol St. New Phone 583 

Messina New Bldg. Upstairs 



Jackson 



Mississippi 



DRINK CARBONATED 



Just here the two concluding 
numbers of the musical program | 
j were rendered : “ O, Morning \ 

Land,” by Stanley and Mc- 
i Donough. and “God Be With You 1 
Till We Meet Again.” by the 
Hadyn Quartette. 

In concluding the program, N. 

! B. Harmon discussed “Hope.” It j 
matters not, the speaker said, to I 
what depths a man may go, there 
is one thing that does not desert \ 
him. He may be where he has 
lost faith in himself, the world, 
and even’ one. it may be that he 
cannot pray, but deep down in j 
his heart there is a hope that 
i some time and some where things | 
will come out for the better. Al- 
together. this discussion and the 
others were such as to cause those J 
present to consider the things ; 
that were said and take them as j 
part of their life. 



IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS In a short business session the 
^ resignation of Mr. W. S. Burns 

,oca-Cola Bottling Co ^ j as treasurer was accepted, and 

Mr. Olin Ray was elected in his 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI place. 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 



“Dunlap” Hats jackson’s greatest store 

S. I. JOHNSON 

fall Styles COMPANY 

We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 

PRICE Manhattan Shirts 

known as the best 

$15 to $25.00 

TOY TUCM 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F, WATKIN5, President 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 

$6 and $6.50 






QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Voi. v. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1912. 



No. 8. 



GALLOWAY SOCIETY. 



Henry Declaims — Officers Elected 
for Second Term and Presidents 
for Last Two Terms — Blount 
Elected University Debater. 



Friday night was election night 
at the Galloway Society and con- 
sequently most of the regular pro- 
gram was dispensed with and the | 



BASKET BALL PROGRESS 




The Iron in the Fire — Team Maying Great 
Showing Under Coach Fletcher — Season 
Opens Soon — Many Candidates For All 
Positions on the Team. 





BY THE AID OF FATE. 



Time. 8 :30 P. M. 

A young man walks leisurely 
down Broadway smoking a cigar. 
He is accosted by a beautiful 
young lady heavily veiled. She 
walks up to him and with a pair 
of scissors cuts the second button 
off of his overcoat, places a hot 



... Basket Ball is an interesting feature of the Athletics at Millsaps. buttered biscuit in his hand, ut- 

jmrtica actions a owe to ha\e £ oae jj Fletcher has a large squad out every afternoon. From 4 to 6 ters the word “Parallelogram,” 

o’clock every afternoon is given to very strenuous practice. This is and walks rapidly down a side 
proving very beneficial, as one on the side lines is able to see a great street. 

improvement in the work of all the men. Harmon brothers are devel- (The above synopsis was given 

oping a fine eye for the goal. These fellows are going to make the , by Dr. Kern to the Sophomore 

team of this year a fine record. Cook is a guard second to none. It j English class to complete. The 

is going to take a forward of no little strength and activity to goal best story received by him was 

on him. j furnished by Jack Gaddis, and is 

Kirkland. “Cap,” is an old stand-by and in him we have a guard ; as follows) : 

. . „ , that is able not only to keep his man from goaling, but to carry the 

the most interesting events of the , , , . ... . , . X r 

T . , , , ball to his goal and many times add two pomts to the score. Henry 

year. It seems that the members 



full swing. 

The only article on the literary 
program that was retained was a 
declamation by E. E. Henry. 
Henry was well prepared for the 
occasion and acquitted himself 
with a great deal of credit. 

Next came the election of offi- 
cers, which proved to be one of 



At first I was too astonished to 

brothers are showing themselves verv efficient. ’Tis interesting to an ' t,UI 'a except gaze stupidly 
, , , ,, ,, n , j, ., , ,, from the trot biscuit in my hand 

look at the way these fellows handle the ball. 

tt , , „ , ,. „ T . ,, ,, , . , T i • to the back of the young woman 

Hurrah! Gaddis, Jack, threw a goal this week. Jack is an- J ° 

other guard; a good one, too, he is, for when all others seem to have as s ie ra P>uly walked down a side 
failed in wresting the ball from the opposing team Jack saves the ; street - Suddenly it occurred to 
g ame I me that perhaps here was an ad- 

Broomfield and Bell are two forwards in whom every one has ' enture ^at certainly had noth- 
great confidence. These fellows are going to demand attention when , commonplace about- it, so I 
the time for choosing the Varsity is at hand. Case and Jones are started after the fast disappearing 

good guards and in them is seen good material for the team of this fi£ ,lre ot this unusual young wom- 

year. Rooker, the giant centre, is shewing up well and has many j an - ^he wa ^ ec ^ briskly , but I 

good qualities for a forward as well. noticed she glanced o\er her 

It is a pleasing fact that the interest in Basket Ball is not con- shoulder seieral times and seemed 

fined to the players, but that the Athletic Association is so much in- sa t>sfied that I was following, so 

Judge James A. Blount was teres ^ e( j that they have purchased suits for the team. They have ! ^ continued the chase, 
elected to represent the Society shown t j lat they are filing to do all that they can to put out a Her face had looked somewhat 

in the MillsapsUmversity De- winning team th j s year Tim students are looking forward to a familiar to me even through the 

record-breaking year in Basket Ball. The first game of the season heavy veil, and suddenly I re- 
will be played in a week or two and the team will then enter into the membered that I had seen this 

work for the season. 

Fifteen Rahs for Basket Ball! 



of the Society had come to the 
meeting with an eye single only to 
the interests of the Society and 
that they were determined to elect 
the very best men for the various 
places. 

The result follows : Second 

term — President, Lampton ; Vice- 
President, Broomfield; Secretary, 

J. B. Cain ; Assistant Secretary, 

K. M. Broom. Third term — Presi- 
dent, Cassibry. Fourth term — 
President, Willingham. 



Misses Watkins, Curry and 
Easterling were elected honorary 
members of the Societv. 



LAMAR LITERARY SOCIETY. I ^ r e 

| wrangling or suffragette s cries for Fourth term — President. Bos 

„„ , TT J power arose to mar the serenity well; Vice-Pres.. Patterson; Sec 

Program Moved Up and Officers „ , 

- „ . of the occasion. 

for Year Elected — Bailey Elect- . . ,. , 

J | The following is a complete list 



ed as University Debater. . „ , 

of those elected: 

The Lamars met at the usual ■ Second term — President, 



Ma- 



re t ary, Brown. 

The Society decided to have an 
intercollegiate debate with the 



same woman staring intently at 
! me several times at dinner. Then 
it occurred to me that I might be 
the victim of some plot, and I 
hesitated an instant, but only an 
instant, for just then the young 
woman glanced over her shoulder 
and it occurred to me that prob- 
ably I might aid this beautiful girl 



hour, but instead of taking up Gee ; Vice-Pres., Hobbs ; Secreta 



University of Mississippi and Mr. 

Bailey of the law class was elected some so I resolved to see 



the appointed program, the elec- ] ry, Harrison: Critic, Watkins; as the debater to represent the the adventure to a close, no mat- 



tion of officers for the ensuing Censor, Ridgeway ; Doorkeeper. Society. 

terms was declared in order so Montgomery. 

as to get them in the Bobashela. Third term — President. Scott; What would Millsaps be with- 
Harmony reigned supreme | Vice-Pres.. Blewett; Secretary, out the co-eds? Didn’t some Prof, 
throughout the election — no Lusk: Treasurer. Gathings. say “paradise”? 



ter what happened. 

In about a quarter of an hour’s 
walk I noticed we were approach- 
ing the part of the city inhabited 
by Russians, and in a few min- 






2 



€frc purple anO QUbitc 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott .Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 



C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby ' 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse.-Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton: Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 



Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President | 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison ..Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary , 

Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. Carraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding -President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief j 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 1 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. B F. L Magee n ...~l Business Mana S ers 



utes the girl stopped in front of a 
disreputable looking house, and 
after hesitating for an instant and 
looking back at me once more, the ( 
door opened and she walked in. 
Having resolved to see this ad- 
venture to the end, and being a 
little stubborn besides, I walked 
boldly up to the door. As I ex- ) 
pected, the door was locked, and 



Senior. 

S. B. Lampton 

J. C. Honeycutt 

F H McGee 


President 

..Vice President 
Secretary 


W. M. Cain 


Treasurer 


Junior. 




D. J. Savage 


President 


T. M. Cooper 


..Vice President 




Secretary 




Treasurer 


SOPHOMORE. 


R. H. Harmon 


President 


K. M. Broom 


.Vice President 


C. Bullock 


Secretary 


O W. Harrison 


Treasurer 


FRESHMAN. 


T. L. Carraway 


Presidnt 


J. N. McNeil 


.Vice President 


Miss Fannie Buck 


Secretary 


Law. 




T. L. Bailey 


President 


J. A. Blount 


.Vice President 


— ■. — . Dabney 


Secretary 



F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters • 

R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell -Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems..M illsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 



i when I tried to open it I was 
asked some question in Russian, 
which I could not understand, but j 
suddenly an idea occurred to me ; 
and I answered, “Parallelogram.” 
Then a hand was stuck through 
an opening that I had not noticed 
in the side of the door, and not j 
knowing what to do, I put the 
still warm biscuit in the out- 
stretched hand. Immediately the | 
door was opened and I found my- 
self in the midst of a motley crowd 
of Russians, about twenty in num- 
ber. 

The room into which I had en- 
tered was almost dark, being il- 
luminated only by some burning 
incense which gave the room a 
mysterious, if somewhat smoky 
air. At the far end of the room 
there was a chair on a slightly j 
raised platform and occupied by 
a somewhat distinguished looking 
person who seemed to be the lead- 
er. Evidently by the set looks on 



their faces something important 1 to the end of the room where the 
was about to happen, so I attract- incense was burning and placed 
ed very little attention. us beside a table of black, pol- 

Soon a hat was passed around ished wood ’ ob which 1 could see 
and each one of the crowd, includ- a sllver parallelogram and on the 

ing the girl, drew out and ex- four sldes o£ thls fi ^ ure were 
amined a button. When the hat words inscrib ed in Russian. The 

was passed to me I drew out one mau 011 tbe P' atdonn got U P £r0lU 
also, and found it to be of a his chair > came down to 08 and 
rather strange pattern. Then the said in broken English: 
girl said something in Russian 'Do you swear by the Christ 
that caused most of the others to that died on the Cross, and the 
look at her in pity, although I Parallelogram, that you will do 
detected a look of relief and sat- whatever this order shall eom- 
isfaction in some of their eyes, niand ? 

I had just about decided to make The Russians were all around us 
a break for the street, but seeing with their long knives drawn, but 
the pale; drawn face of the girl the girl was trying to keep cool, 
and the look of horror in her an j turning towards me she shook 
eyes, I changed my mind. her head very slightly, and did I 

The buttons were put back into see > or only think I saw, some- 
the hat and it was again passed thing more than pity in the eyes 
around, and this time I drew the of this strange girl who so strong- 
button cut from my coat by the l. v attracted me? Under any oth- 
young woman. This seemed to or circumstances I would prob- 
please the Russians very much ably have done what I was told 
and they lead the girl and myself to do, but before I would have 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 



NEW STORE NEW STOCK NEW FIXTURES 

A NEW DRUG STORE 

An elegant place for you to treat yourself and 
your friends. 

A handsome new Puffer Soda Fountain from 
which will be dispensed all the popular beverages, 
fancy ices and ice creams. 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

Our Drug Stock is fresh and clean and we use 
only the purest and best of everything. You may 
be sure you will be well protected if you entrust 
your drug business to us. 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

(Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery.) 






3 



this girl think me a coward, I 
would fight the whole world. 

Just then we heard a noise and 
turned around in time to see the 
police burst in the door, and then 
everything was in a tumult. In 
the confusion the girl caught my 
hand, and pushing aside some cur- 
tains. opened a door and when we 
had gone through, shut and locked 
it. Then she led me through a 
long passage into the street. We 
walked on for some distance, 
neither of us saying a word, until 
we came to a bench in a little 
park. After sitting in silence a 
few minutes, I said : 

“Would you mind explaining 
the many strange things that have 
happened tonight?” 

“I will tell you everything,” 




PINS & 
EMBLEMS 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 



of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving j our 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Cbc purple anO SUftite 



DIRECTORY 



said she, after thinking for a min- ] 
ute. “Those people you saw to- 
night belong to a band of religious 
fanatics whose religion centers 
around a parallelogram on one'j 
side of which is written. ‘ The | 
Lord,’ on the opposite side, ‘Thej 
Holy Spirit,’ and on the other) 
two sides. ‘The Christ’ and ‘The! 
Virgin Mary.’ ” 

‘ ‘ I understand now whv you 
cut the button from my coat, but 
why did you give me the hot bis- 1 
cuit, and why did you pick me j 
out?” I asked. 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 

WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 



“It is the custom of these peo- 
ple to pick out a person whom 
none of them know, to take part 
in their meetings, and if he does 
not agree to their demands they 
are immediately made way with 
as enemies of the faith. Why I 
picked you out I do not know. 
The hot biscuit was a test of your 
interest; if it had become cold 
! before you arrived at the door 
you would not have been admit- 
ted. because they would have 
known that you did not come di- 
rectly. but possibly stopped some- 
where to get assistance. In order 
to keep it warm it was necessary 
that yon. come at once, and if you 
had re-warmed it they could have 
told by the looks of the butter.” 

“But what are you doing in 
this band of cut-throats?” I asked. 

“Back in Russia, where I live,” 
she replied, “they have such a 
strong control over my father that 
he dedicated me to them. Do you 
know that if we had sworn the 
oath we would have been com- 
pelled to assassinate a minister or 
have lost our lives? So far I had 
been lucky enough to escape 
drawing my own button.” 

She shuddered and covered her 
face with her hands. I took her 
hands in mine ; I felt them trem- [ 
ble, but she made no effort to 
withdraw them. 

“Beautiful girl.” I said, “I 
love you. Although I do not even I 
know your name. I love you. 
Could you learn to love me?” 

As I held her in my arms her 
beautiful eyes told me far better 
than words could have done that 
she loved me. and I had won her 
by the Aid of Fate. 



Some one has suggested that 
the faculty have the observatory j 
moved over nearer the chapel, so 
that they can observe when the 
students are going to take a holi- 
day. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J4 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 

Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



Jackson, Miss. 



I 



The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 



JACKSON CAFE 

For Ladies and Gentlemen. 

The Cleanest Place in Town. 
Popular Prices, Quick Service. 
Try Once and You Will Come Again. 
222 W. Capitol St. 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



The Jones Printing Company 



DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 

LOGAN PHILIPS 

DOES A Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 

GENERAL PRINTING RUSINESS 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
109 North state St. JACKSON, MISS. SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 

HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson’ Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision -and relief of eye- 
strain. 

-E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 





4 



€bc purple ano mbitt 



Oc purple and QUliite sion is closed or do not return the do away with such faulty condi- 

next year. These boys, too, as a tions. A great majority of the 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 

Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. sluden ts. Others who 



general rule, are the very best boys would stay there and would 



remain become mutually acquainted and 
H. H. Boswell Editor-In-Chief throughout the course are so ’interested in each other and, 

Mi ss S^Ia McGehee^^Soctal Editm cram P ed '»/ the lack of means therefore, interested in the Col- 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor that they can not attain the high- ! lege, for of what is a College corn- 
s' L. rrnckett Specia^Reporter est development or do the best posed if it is not of the students 

Some work with a picture who attend it? A College spirit 

in the College 
which would 
permeate the State and draw stu- 
Auother reason why Millsaps dents here who would have gone 

publication needs a dormitory is that such a to other Colleges which have 

building would, in our opinion, what we lack, 
greatly increase the attendance. 



T. L. Bailey Law Editor \ work. 

A. B. bolder re S ch o ol Editor continually, in their minds of a and an interest 
J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 1 large debt staring them in the would be aroused 

S.' B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers face when the - v leave College. 

W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3 : 00 o’clock on Saturday. 



worthy to be sought for. 

We sincerely hope that there 
will be a keen, spirited race for 
this acknowledgment of mental 
and physical ability. 

Faculty Divides Administrative 
Work. 



It is not our purpose to suggest 



uSXTT r™ A " d ,h » is «» e ° d be plans ,„ r ,he building of a .lor- 



Manager. 



Our purpose in writing 



desired. We believe that Millsaps 1 mitory 
Entered as second class matter. College will be in the very near this article is to arouse the minds 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, future recognized as one ot the of those who have charge of the 

March 3, 1879. leading institutions not only of destiny of the College to the im- 

One year’s subscription..... $1.50 the State but also of the South, portance of the cause that we have 

Extra a copies 0n t a o wbSte5!lZ“ ^OS And h ou ? ht to have an attend ' espoused. We hope that their 
Extra copies to non-subscribers to anee proportionate to its recog- fertile brains will soon mature a 

A nnWMTTnPV T?mi MTT T capq I nlZed standmg ' We have llttle | P lan for the accomplishment of an 
A DUKMliUKx t OK MILLSAPS patience with the man who sits in end so greatly to be desired. 

[his easy chair and professes him-[ 



We have been greatly inter- J se pf as satisfied with the present 
ested in a petition, which has attendance at [Millsaps. MiHsans 



been circulated by several mem- College ought to have an attend- 1 ” “ ^ 

bers of the Senior Class and ance 0 f a t least three hundred and I t S ” 6 j m3 6 ^ 



We believe that the awarding 
of a fellowship by the College to | lyceum 



signed by every member of it, ad- 
dressed to the Board of Trustees 
of the College, asking that some- 
thing be done toward the building 
of a dormitory for the college. 
In our opinion, all the other needs 
of the college do not equal this 
one in importance. Since the es- 
tablishment of the [Millsaps Pre- 
paratory School, which uses the old 
dormitory, the College has been 
wholly without accommodations, 
except boarding house accommo- 
dations. 

Without stressing further the 
need of such a building, for we 
assume that no reasonable person 
would deny this, we wish to ex- 
amine some of the reasons why it 
is needed. These are varied and 
distinct. First and foremost. 



fifty or four hundred students. | 
This end will never be accom- 
plished until sufficient and rea- 
sonable accommodation shall have 
been provided. 

The last reason that we shall 
set forth why Millsaps needs a 
dormitory is by no means the 
least. There is one most im- 
portant ingredient that the Mill- 
saps student body lacks, and it 
needs this in order to make it an 
all-round desirable body. This in- 
gredient is enthusiasm for the in- j 
terest of the College, more gen 
erally known as College spirit. 
Without a genuine College spirit 
among the students, no College 
can reach the heights that if is 
possible to attain. Without at- 
tempting to show that there is 



average during the scholastic 
year will mean much towards the 
promotion of scholarship at Mill- 
I saps. Laying aside the pecuniary 
recompense to be derived from it. 
the honor, alone, of winning this 
prize should be sufficient to en- 
courage every man in school to 
strive to be the successful con- 
testant. 

The broad, liberal basis upon 
which it is founded — the fact that 
it will not be awarded to a m§re 
book-worm, but that the winner tions. 
must be an active participant in — 
all phases of College life, makes 
it all the more desirable 



The executive work of the facul- 
ty has recently been divided among 
the members of the faculty, each 
one taking certain departments of 
the college over which he will have 
jurisdiction and for which he will 
receive all petitions and sugges- 
tions. 

The distribution is as follows: 

Dr. A. F. Watkins: Department 
of administration, schedule, ad- 
mission, faculty curriculum. 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan : Departments 
of religious life, Y. M. C. A. and 
Preachers’ League, laboratory, lec- 
tures and addresses and campus 
improvements. 

Dr. M. W. Swartz: Financial 

matters, board, fees, room rent, 
course, buildings and 

grounds. 

Dr. A. A. Kern: Library, col- 
lege publications and Bible clas- 
ses. 

Prof. E. Y. Burton: Physical 

life, gymnasium, athleties and rec- 
ord of students. 

Prof. J. M. Burton : Honor- 
council, fraternities and glee club. 

Prof. G. L. Harrel : Press, 

alumni, annual conference, liter- 
ary societies and observatory. 

Prof. J. R. Lin: Teaching, affil- 
iated schools, intercollegiate rela- 



Official Freshman ladies’ man — 
and Hendricks. 



there is the financial aspect of the j little College spirit at Millsaps, 
question from the viewpoint of for no one will deny this, let us 
the student. Board is not to be , ask the cause of its absence. The 
had for less than seventeen dob j greatest cause is that the students 
lars per month, and the best are too scattered. They are not 
boarding houses charge eighteen, compact enough. Not more than 
This is more, a good deal more, one-fourth of them are on Mill- 
than seventy-five per cent of the ( saps grounds proper, and not as 
boys who come to Millsaps can many as a dozen stay in any one 
really afford to pay. Nevertheless, house. As a result, the students 
those who come, and stay, pay it. do not know each other. They 
There is no way out of it if they know only the small number of 
remain. The result is that a great [ boys who stay in their neighbor 
many boys, finding that their par- hood. A spacious and well- 
ents can not stand this drain, equipped dormitory, with a rea- 
either withdraw before the ses- sonable charge for board, would 



Tailored Specially For You 

Every garment will be strictly hand tailored to 
your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 



Best Fit 
Best Values 



815 Best Assortment 



Best Service 

Others at $16.50, $18, S20, $22.50, & $25 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 



€bc purple anD (EQftite 



5 



LOCALS. 

How about some more music, 
Logne ? 

There was a fire last week, but 
‘"Fatty” Blewett out. 

Jack Gaddis spent Saturday 
and Sunday at borne — as usual. 

Boys! See Hobbs, the college 
barber for good barbering. 

All is quiet tonight along the 
Potomac — also on the campus. 

Jack Brewer spent last Satur- 
day visiting friends in Edwards, 
U. S. A. 

Marvin Pitman, an old Millsaps 
man, visited the Willingham boys 
Saturday and Sunday. 

. “Jerry” Montgomery drove in 
last week from a tour over the 
. northern part of the State. 

Lost : Some strings and nails. 

An ample reward is offered for 
return to Jack Condrey. 

W. M. Cain returned from his 
home last week where he has been 
recuperating from grippe. 

Some of the Prep co-eds have! 
forgotten the alphabet beyond the 
first two letters (A. B.). 

— 

H. H. Womack, an old Confed- 
erate veteran from Webster coun- 
ty, visited D. J. Savage last week, i 

Happy Freshman (in holiday 
parade): “What care I for ex- 

penses — Dad’s had ’em all his 
life.” 

John Phillips, “Infant John,” 
says that he don ’t .like to fish for 
oysters. It takes them too long to 
bite. 

Boys, have your Tailoring done 
at Doxey’s, and save the special 
discount which he gives to College 
boys. 3t 

" Ernest Herbert is a valuable 
member of the College Orchestra 
whose name failed to appear in 
the writeup last week. 

J. T. Weems, the efficient busi- 1 
ness manager of the Bobashela. 
returned W ednesday from a visit j 
to his parents at Gunn, Miss. 



Jack Condrey and “Doc” Cris- 
ler were “laid up” with colds the 
•first of the week, much to the re- 
gret of their many friends. 

The Harris Business University 
is as good as any in the South. If 
you are thinking of taking a busi- 
ness course, give it a consideration. 

Miss Sallie Bailey was on the 
campus the other day. We were 
glad to welcome her among us 
again and to hear of her success 
in teaching. 

Miss McGehee: “Isn’t it possi- 
ble to form a perfect vacuum?” 

Miss Steen: “Certainly, my 

dear; your head is a striking ex- 
ample.” 

There has been organized a new 
kind of debating society in shack 
No. 5. Only questions of national 
importance will be discussed in 
this socitey and the Code of the 
State of Mississippi will be the 
constitution and by-laws. 




You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to 



wear 



J4C/TS0RS BEST STORE, 



Fellows, did you notice that pro- — 



fuse smile on Dr. Swartz’s face 
when a speaker exhorted the stud- 
ents to take advantage of their op- 
portunities and prepare each 
Latin and Greek lesson well. 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 



Some of the Freshmen went | 
about the other day weeping | 
crocodile tears when they heard 
that “Ducky” Lin was going to 
take a holiday and use up some 
of his “cuts.” 



Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 

TATOM SHOE CO. 



, 415 East Capitol St. 




Wanted. 

Some curls by Freshman co- 
eds. 

Steam heat, by Junior co-eds. 

An argument, by Miss McGehee. 

Some one to love, Hawthorne. 

Some news. Gathings. 

Prof. Lin returned the first of 
the week from Spartanburg, S. C. 
He reports a very enthusiastic 
meeting there and that Millsaps 
will probably be chosen to act as 
host of the conference at their 
next session. 

“Phil” McNeil (in Math, 
room) : Prof. Burton, who is this 
man Guy I hear so much about 
around here? 

Prof. Burton: That’s the Vice- 
President of the institution. His 
office is on the third floor of this 

U .xiding. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. 

R. W.. MILLSAPS, Vice President. 



AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 
W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



6 



€t)£ purple anD CTitc 



Misses Myers and Blount, two W. P. Perins and “Nat” Jokn- 
seniors of I. I. and C., were on the son were paid a delightful visit 
campus last week, h or further in- i as t week by some friends from 
formation see \V . E. Morse. their home town. 



A number of the boys enjoyed We are glad to annonnee that 
the recital (and aftermath) at w g Peannan , who has beeu verv 

Belhaven Saturday night. Here’s m at the Baptist Hospital, is now 
hoping they will have another j improving rapidly . 



We regret very much the in- 
tended departure of Harry Lassi- 
ter and Charlie Crisler, who will 
leave immediately for Southwest- 
ern University. While we regret j 
very much the departure of 
“Dot” and “Midget,” we feel 
sure that they will make that in- 
stitution good men. 



The basket ball team is doing 
good work. The old men are 
showing up well and there is some 
good material in the new ones. The 
team should be congratulated on 
being able to secure the coaching 
services of Hobart, who is an ex- 
perienced player and knows the 
game from start to finish. 



A good, spicy article on the 
Seniors’ trip to Byram and Rose- 
mary was crowded out of last 
week’s issue on account of too 
much copy turned in. The Seniors 
have been lamenting this fact all 
the week for they had a great trip 
that was both profitable and pleas- 
ant. 



The Kappa Mu Sorority held 
its annual initiation last Saturday 
afternoon. Misses Bessie Easter- 
ling and Ella Lee were initiated. 
After the initiation dainty re- 
freshments were served and a reg- 
ular “love feast” was indulged in 
both by the old and new mem- 
bers. 



Prep Locals. 



Hip ! Haw ! Hurrah ! Vote for 
me. I am it. — 1 1 Bob ’ ’ Willingham. 

A. B. Holder spent the latter 
part of last week in Raymond, 
Miss., where he had a delightful 

bird hunt. 



The Preps are still climbing. 
They have now launched a month- 
ly magazine, which has a promise 
of great success. The name of this 
j magazine is “The Rambler,” the 
motto. “Not on top but still climb- 
ing.” The stalf has been appoint- 
ed by the faculty. The following 
men have been selected : Editor in 
Chief, L. H. Gates; Associate Ed- 
itor, M. F. Clegg ; Literary Editor, 
Aubrey Wooten; Social Editor, 
Miss Elizabeth Watkins; Athletic 
Editor. N. Golding. 

Business Managers : A. B. Hol- 
der. “Bob” Willingham. 

Local Editors : C. D. Williams, 
E. H. Joyce. 

Special Reporter: G. P. Waller. 

With this splendid staff to do 
the work and with the entire stu- 
dent body to support it, this mag- 
azine can fall nothing short of sue- ! 
cess. 



In December a Sophomore’s 
fancy lightly turns to thoughts of 
hair cutting. 




MONOTYPE MACHINE PLANT 



FOR - THE ■ YOUNG • MAN 

“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. * 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. . 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring frorq any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnqlly’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss. These machines are 
used on the highest grade of catalogue and book work. 




Qe ffutple anD COfjirc 





WE MAKE HIGH GRADE ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS 
AND KINDS. 

Our collections of individuals include fruits, flowers, figures 
and designs suitable for any occasion. 

Brick and Neapolitan we make in any combination of flavors 
and colors desired. 

Write us what you want and when you want it to arrive and 
we will do the rest. 

CARLOSS ICE COMPANY 



(INCORPORATED) 

Manufacturers of ICE AND ICE CRFAM. 



JACKSON, 



MISSISSIPPI. 



Arrow 

Notch COLLARS 

THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIGHTS 
GLASGOW 2H In. BELMONT 2 H in. 
MEDORA 2Kln. CHESTER 2 In. 

2for?5ct». C UETT, PEABOQV & CO., Maker* 



Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



Rensselaer 



Established 1821 

Troy, N. Y. 



Polytechnic 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Courses tn Civil Engineering (C. E.). Mechanical En- 
gineering < M. E.). Ehectrical Engineering (E. E.), and 
General Science < B. S.). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Material.* Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Wroten Discusses “The Duty of 
Development. ’ ’ 



The Association was again for- 1 
tunate at its last regular meeting 
i in having one of its own members ! 
to discuss a question vital to col- 
lege men. Especially was it for- 
tunate in the person of this speak- 
er, J. T. Wroten. of the Senior I 
Class. Wroten is a speaker of j " 
unusual ability, a loyal member I 
of the Y. II. C. A., and a close 
student of college life. 

The speaker began by reading 
a part of Paul's letter to Timothy. 
Attention was called to the fact | 
that the advice was given to a 
young minister, preparing himself 
for life’s work, and therefore' 
might be given with equal appli - 1 
cation to the college men of to- 1 
da)'. The exhortation to which 
i attention was called was the com- 
mand that Timothy should stir up 
that gift which God had placed in j 
his life. In connection with what 
this gift really was, that was in 
the life of Timothy and in our I 
lives, the speaker gave a general 
definition of this gift as follows : 

I ‘ ‘ That within us which if devel- 
oped would cause us to be useful ; 
to God.” No life can be in any 
j measure a success unless it is a 
j useful life and can carry to some 
| one else the message of hope and 
cheer. 

Development is not only a per- 
sonal growth, but at times even 
a national growth. There was a 
I time when this great continent of | 
America had undergone no pro- 
i cess of development. But when 
the white men, God’s envoys, 
came a great change was made. 

[ and is still being made. Through j 
Christian influences our countrv 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



JACKSON MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 



SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. S E U T T E R ’ S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

- This Gallery is the largest in the State and one • of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 



8 




CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



Now is the Time 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 

S. P. McRAE 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 
Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard 
& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle 
Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 
214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 



W. F. WEST 

Practical 
Merchant 
T ailor 

J24 W . Capitol St. New Phone 5&3 

Messina New Bldg. Upstairs 

Jackson Mississippi 



DRINK CARBONATED 




IN BOTTLES 5 CENTS 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Che purple anD mbi te 



nations of the earth. 



developed. 



| along these lines is robbing God, 



j service. So far as man is con- 
j cerned he does not belong to him- 



tion. 

In conclusion, the sp 
named some things which 



keep 



as they should. First is our great 
national curse, that of drink. 
Some man has well said : “0, that 
men will put into their mouths an 
enemy to take away their brains. 
Another thing that is harmful to 
students is the habit of reading 
bad literature, while another 
equally as had is that of imj 
thoughts, which must and have 
lead to impure actions, and has 
wrecked and ruined the lives of 
many. 

SCIENCE CLUB MEETS. 



Three Good Addresses. 



The Science Club held its regu- 
lar monthly meeting Friday after- j 
noon. Messrs. Lester, Wroten 
and Kirkland read excellent pa- j 
pers on the subjects, “The Use of 
Electricity in Building the Pan- 
ama Canal.” “The Manufacture 
of Wood Pulp” and “Hydropho- 
bia,” respectively. 

Under the direction of Dr. Sul- 
livant and Pres. Lester the club 
is doing excellent work and all 
the meetings are interesting and 
well attended. 

ANNUAL WELL UNDER WAY. 



The contract for the Annual 
has been let to the Hammersmith 
Engraving Co., the people who 
have published it for several | 
years past. The work has been 
apportioned out among the dif- 
ferent editors and they are fast 
garnering it in. Much of the | 
work will be done before Xmas 
and the Annual will make its ap-i 
pearance in the early spring. 



1 < 

I 


[dt) 


This Space Reserved For 


NYE WILSON 


1 


V 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
. Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys' 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$1.50, $1.75, $2 

TRY THEM 




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QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Voi. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1912. 



No. 10. 



PRESIDENT’S REPORT. 



Dr. Watkins Submits the Follow- 
ing Report to Conferences. 



Dear Brethren: 

The session of the College, clos- 
I ing June last under the adminis- 
tration of Rev. David Carlisle 
Hull, was probably the equal of 
^ any in the history of the institu- 
* tion. The enrollment was scarce- 
ly less than the best, and probably 
j|the College has never done better 
'work. 



The past few years in the history of the college have been event- 
ful ones and the happenings have been fraught with great conse- 
quences that portend greater achievements in the future. So many 
dreams we cherished only a short time ago have been realized that 
to keep pace with progress we must now dream of a Greater Millsaps. 
Millsaps has been granted intercollegiate athletics, and she has 
pledged and insists that her games be of the clean, manly type. 



OUR BISHOP. 



With the opening of the present 
session in September, the fear was 
entertained that on account of 

f 

adverse industrial conditions 
throughout the State, the attend- 
ance was likely to be smaller. It 
is very gratifying to be able to 
' state that these fears have not 
been realized and that our enroll- 
r ment is fairly in excess of that of 
last session at this time. We have 
been fortunate also in that the 
new students were unusually well- 
prepared and but few of them 
have had to leave. This fact ap- 
plies to all departments of in- 
struction, and it is probable that 
there are now more students in 
actual attendance than at any 
time in the history of the College. 

A vacancy in the faculty was 
filled last summer by the election 
of Prof. J. Reese Lin to the chair j 
of History and Economics* The 
selection has proven very fortu- 
nate, and our faculty today, in 
the equipment of the men, their 
devotion to their work, their har- 
mony among themselves, and 
their loyalty to the best interests 
of the school, is doubtless unsur- 
passed in the twenty years of the 
life of the College. In its grounds, 
its buildings, and its general 

(Continued on page 3) 



MAJOR R. W. MILLSAPS 



Millsaps College’s Greatest Benefactor, who will Duplicate 
Every Dollar Given the College. 



Major Millsaps has given us an athletic field that is the pride of all. 

With increased enrollment in every department activities have 
flourished and caught the spirit of progress. The Millsaps Science 
Club has been organized under the direction of Dr. Sullivan. -Two 
new literary clubs, and a society for the promotion of scholarship, 
have been formed. The Millsaps Orchestra has made its appearance 
and furnishes delightful music on many occasions. A commencement 
daily has been added to the list of college publications. New debates 



Bishop Henry Clay Morrison, 
who will hold the sessions of the 
j North Mississippi and Mississippi 
Conferences this year, is account- 
ed one of the most eloquent 
preachers in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. 

He is a native of Georgia and 
has served as pastor the leading 
churches of that State and Ken- 
tucky, where most of his minis- 
terial life has been spent. He was 
! elected a Bishop of the Church in 
the General Conference which was 
held in Baltimore in May, 1898. 
At the time of his election he was 
the Secretary of the General 
Board of Missions, and signalized 
his occupancy of that office by 
raising a special fund of $125,000 
to pay a debt that was embarrass- 
ing the operations of the Board. 

This is not Bishop Morrison’s 
first official visit to our State; for 

on more than one occasion he has 

• 

presided over the deliberations of 
our Conferences. We welcome 
Bishop Morrison to the State, and 
hope it will be possible for him 
during his stay in Mississippi to 
make a visit to Millsaps College. 



President A. F. Watkins Speaks 
to the Association. 



Quite a large number of stv 
dents assembled in the Y. M. 

A. Hall Friday night, Nov. 29 
hear Dr. Watkins. 

The subject was taken from 
first chapter of the Gospel 
James. The speaker called a 
tion to the difference bet 
Paid, who preached the gos 
faith, and James, who taug 
gospel of works. The text 
discourse was ’this: “Bu 

(Continued on page 



KEEP MILLSAPS COLLEGE NEAR YOUR HEARTS 

She Has the Biggest, Brightest and Best Opportunity of any College in the South— Maj. Millsaps Offers to Duplicate Every Dollar Given the 
College— Resume of the Past and Predictions for the Future— Some Needs as We Grow— Make This Meeting of Conference aGr and Rally 









2 



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College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern. Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz . Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott. President 

S. L. Crockett.. Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon. Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

.—Hob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

J. Savage President 

C. Willingham Vice President 

Bullock -.Treasurer 

L. Carraway Secretary [ 

Prentiss. 

Golding President 

W. Alford *ice President 

B. Bufkin Secretary 

H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 



D. 

T. 

C. 

T. 

N. 

C. 

L. 

L. 



Senior. 

S. B. Lampton 




President 


J. C. Honeycutt 


.Vice President 


F. H. McGee 




.Secretary 


W. M. Cain 




Treasurer 


Junior. 

D. J. Savage 




.President 


T. M. Cooper 


.Vice 


President 


I. W. Howe 




.Secretary 


H. L. Lassiter 




Treasurer 


SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon 


.President 


K. M. Broom 

C. Bullock 


.Vice 


President 

.Secretary 


G. W. Harrison 




Treasurer 



FRESHMAN. 

| T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

I J. N. McNeil Vice President 

ydiss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

L. Bailey President 

) A. Blount Vice President 

— . Dabney Secretary 

L Thompson : Treasurer 

1 1 LLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 

Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters, 
f. Weems W. E. Morse 
Triangular Debaters. 
l Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
Selby. 

^ps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
Cirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

I Boswell Anniversarian 

|>cott -Anniversary Orator 

ems.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
Williams, Jr. 
ibot 

Mid-Session Debaters 



OUR PRESIDENT. KEEP MILLSAPS COLLEGE NEAR YOUR HEARTS 




We regret very much the loss 
of C. A. Williams, who has been 
forced to quit school on account 
of his eyesight. Williams was a 
strong man in all of the college 
activities and he will be greatly 
missed from our ranks. 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 



ALEXANDER FARRAR WATKINS, 
A. B., D. D., President. 

Mental and Moral Sciences. 

A. B. Vanderbilt, 1882; Field Agent, 
■ Millsaps College, 1890-92; President of 
Whitworth College, 1900-02 ; Vice- 
President Board of Trustees of Mill- 
saps College, 1900-12; Member of 
Mississippi Conference, Phi Delta 
Theta. 



(Continued from page 1) 

have been participated in and the scalps of other colleges annexed 
lo our belt both in oratorical and debating contests. The Preparatory 
school has been separated from the college and has developed into 
one of the best Prep, schools in the country. These and many other 
things go to make up what are rightly called the most successful 
years in the history of the college. 

The past is indeed a glorious history, but however brilliant the 
past we cannot live on reminiscence. History is only valuable as a 
support to faith and a guide for the future. As wants arise they 
must be satisfied ; as demands arise they must be met, for the Mis- 
sissippi Conferences, the management of the college, the students 
and the alumni, the friends of the college everywhere, look forward 
to a greater Millsaps. The foundation has been laid broad and deep, 
the structure must be great and strong. 

Crying needs — needs that are not merely apparent, but needs 
that are imperative, stand in the way of the future growth and wel- 
fare of the college. If Millsaps is to keep up her standing and 
prestige she must offer as good inducements and facilities as other 
institutions. A study of conditions at the college reveals the fact 
that some of these facilities are lacking. A further study of condi- 
tions reveals the fact that it would be a very easy matter to over- 
come these deficiencies. It can be done. 

The assets of the college amount to $506,246.45. Of this amount 
Major Millsaps, the college’s greatest benefactor, has given about 
$275,000.00; Rockefeller, $25,000.00; Citizens of .Jackson, $20,000.00; 
Carnegie, $15,000.00; Calhoon, Green, Nugent and Me Willie, 20 
acres of land; I. C. Enochs, $5,000.00; Tom James, $5,000.00. The 
Church gave $50,000.00 to the endowment, and later through its 
agent, Rev. T. W. Lewis, gave $28,812.00 for Rockefeller fund. 

Among the immediate needs of the college there is of course 
the always apparent need of a bigger endowment. Then there is the 
need of a dormitory, on the necessity of which there is an article in 
this issue. This is probably Millsaps’ greatest need, as nothing can 
lake the place of a dormitory in college life. Aside from its eco- 
nomical advantages, the dormitory serves as a center of student life, 
is a hot-bed of college spirit, promotes the democratic spirit and 
feeling of brotherhood and directly promotes unity and strength of 
the entire student body. 

A Y. M. C. A. gymnasium is another pressing need of the col- 
lege. As an evidence of the esteem in which the gymnasium is held, 
Charles Reynolds Brown, one % of the country’s greatest lecturers on 
college problems, advises boys not to enroll at a college which is not 
equipped with a gymnasium. 

Another thing that needs only to ba mentioned to receive a 



Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates ...Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland -Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T.' Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. B F. L M™g^ n Business Managers 

HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

Clerk 



uearty endorsement is that of a Chair of Theology. Millsaps cannot 
attain her ideals until she has provided her students with the oppor- 
tunity of acquiring within her borders a thorough theological train- 
ing. 

The assertion was made above that these needs can be met. 
This is true because of the fact that Millsaps has an opportunity 
that comes to but few schools. We know of no church school having 
such an offer as Major Millsaps makes to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He offers to duplicate every dollar given by the 
Church. The more important needs of the college could be met with 
$100,000.00, that is, $40,000.00 for a dormitory, $40,000.00 for a gym- 
nasium and the remainder for the other needs. This means that the 
college would have to raise only $50,000.00. It can be done. Our 
sister Church, the Baptist, recently celebrated very jubilantly over 
the fact that they were given the opportunity of raising $200,000,000 
to cover an offer of $100,000.00. Yet we have a standing offer of a 
dollar for every one raised, and are doing nothing. If they can raise 
two for one, there is no reason we can’t start something and raise 
some on a much better proposition, and at the same time do some- 
thing towards supplying our beloved college with the needs that 
stand between her and progress. 

Again, is it just for us to neglect our opportunity? The propo- 



3 



Cl )t purple anD White 



President’s Report. 

(Continued from page 1) 
equipment, the institution was 
never in better condition. 

The finances, under the skillful 
management of the Treasurer of 
the Board of Trustees, are in first 
class condition ; though we should 
never lose sight of the fact that 
the College, like a growing child, 
must meet constantly increasing 
needs, and the lessening rates 
of interest paid by invested funds 
give emphasis to the demand for 
a more adequate endowment. 

There are in the student body 
69 ministerial students and sons 
and daughters of ministers, 31 of 
whom are preparing for the min- 
istry. Of our young preachers 
four are preparing for the minis- 
try of other churches than our 
own. Our Preachers’ League of 
more than thirty members is a 
very fine body of young men. 

We have received from the col- 
lections for education from the 
Annual Conferences, $4,300.00, of 
which $2,300.00 was paid by the 
North Mississippi Conference and 
$2,000.00 by the Mississippi Con- 
ference. In view of the very 
large proportion of our students 
exempt from the payment of tui- 
tion, we would stress the need for 
a liberal assessment for this cause. 

We wish to call attention to 
several very evident needs at the 
College — needs that should re- 
ceive the careful consideration of 
the Church to which the institu- 
tion belongs. 

First of all, there is need for a 
dormitory. Since the setting apart 
of the Preparatory Department 
and its increased attendance the 
Founder’s Hall has ceased to be 
available for the students in the 
College department, and there is 
an increasingly imperative call 
for facilities for furnishing board 
at cheaper rates to the more ad- 
vanced students. The College 
should never lose sight of its 
great purpose to furnish educa- 
tional advantages to young men 
of limited means. 

Secondly, there is ..need for a 
gymnasium and more adequate 
quarters for the Young Men’s 
Christian Association. No provi- 
sion for out-of-door athletics can 
supply the need of a well equip- 1 
(Continued on page 14) 




John Magruder Sullivan, A. M., Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry and 
Geology. 



A. B. Centenary College, 1887; A. 
M. University of Mississippi, 1890; 
Ph. D. Vanderbilt University, 1900; 
Principal Centenary High School, 
1887-89; Prof, of Natural Science, Cen- 
tenary College, 1889-92; Asst, in As- 
tronomy, Vanderbilt University, 1886- 
87; Graduate Student in Chemistry 
and Geology, Summer School, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1907-08; Member 
of the American Chemical Society; 
American Society for the Advance- 
ment of Science; Mississippi State 
Teachers’ Association; Audubon So- 
ciety; Central Association of Science 
and Mathematics; National Geogra- 
phic Society; Methodist Historical 
Society of Mississippi; Educational 
Extension Federation of M. E. Church 
South; Delta Tau Delta. 




Alfred Allan Kern, A. M., Ph. D. 
Professor of English. 



A. B. Randolph-Macon, 1898; A. M., 
1899; Teaching Fellow, Vanderbilt U., 
1899-1900; Virginia Scholarship, Johns 
Hopkins, 1900-02; Fellow in English, 
Johns Hopkins, 1902-03; Fellow by 
Courtesy, Johns Hopkins 1903-04; [ 
1906-07; Ph. D. Johns Hopkins, 1907; 
Member of Modem Languages Ass’n. 
of America; Mississippi Library As- 
sociation; Associate Editor of Kappa 
Alpha Journal; President Sigma Upsi- 
lon; Author of “The Ancestry of 
Chaucer,” and “Irvin Russell,” in the 
Library of Southern Literature;” 
Kappa Alpha, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma 
Upsilon. 



sition made by Major Millsaps is indeed a generous one and the 
future welfare of the college cries out to us to take advantage of our 
opportunity and make this conference a time to commence a big J 
move for greater Millsaps. 



DIRECTORY 


DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 
JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


1 

T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J/2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

' 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
T. O. BYRD, Prop. 

1 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

.408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210J/2 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 




The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON, MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying ' 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im - ; 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 




4 



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€be purple anD CQfiite 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott— Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry -Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett. Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey .Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School , Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoflice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 

; 

EDITORIALS 



The Purple and White extends 
its greetings this week to the 
Mississippi Conference. There is 
naturally a feeling of very close 
relationship between the College 
and the Conferences, occasioned 
by the fact that the College is, 
literally speaking, a child of the 
Conferences, created and nourish- 
ed by them. The zealous care 
and watchfulness which the Con- 
ferences have always exerted over 
the College, has done much to 
mold the high standard of man- 
hood that today is the ideal of the 
Millsaps -student. Frequent visits 
and addresses from members of 
the Conferences have added much 
to the religious Atmosphere that 
permeates the College. The broad, 
liberal and generous policy which 
has been manifested on the part 
of the Conferences towards the 
College has done much towards 
the growth, progress and develop- 
ment of the school. 

Believing that better acquain- 
tance leads to better understand- 
ing, we dedicate this issue of the 
Purple and White to the Confer- 
ence, cherishing the hope that by 
a portrayal of college life at Mill- 
saps, we may to some degree, 
strengthen and enlarge the bonds 
of interests that bind the two. 



Elsewhere in this issue will be 
found the President’s report of 
the condition and work of the 
College. The present year has 
been a highly successful one from 
almost every viewpoint. The at- 



! tendance has been all that one 
I could expect, the discipline has 
been exceptionally good and the 
work has been carried on by 
faculty and students with a vim 
and determination unsurpassed in 
the history of the school. 

Probably the most striking fact 
in the history of this session is the 
most commendable manner in 
which Dr. Watkins has assumed 
control of and managed the af- 
fairs of the College through one 
of the most auspicious and prom- 
ising openings in the school’s his- 
tory. He has not only ably de- 
monstrated that he is an execu- 
tive endowed with ability to suc- 
cessfully cope with every problem 
that may arise in the administra- 
tive work of the institution, but 
that he has back of him the en- 
tire faculty and student body. It 
is useless to say that he has com- 
pletely won the hearts of the 
students, who look upon him as a 
man and a friend in all that the 
words imply. It is but natural 
then that the students should re- 
joice that the present session has 
been one of progress undisturbed 
by factionalism and strife and 
that they should cherish the hope 
that the future success of our 
present President may be not in 
other fields, but in the unending 
growth and development of a 
greater Millsaps. 



THE PREPARATORY DE- 
PARTMENT. 



It is with special interest that 
we have noticed the growth and 
development of the Preparatory 
Department since its separation 
from the college. The success 
with which its work has been car- 
ried on proves conclusively that 
this was a move in the right di- 
rection. Not only has it grown 
in numbers, but in those other 
things which so materially go to 
make up the success of a school — 
that is, in discipline, college spirit 
and pride and devotion to duty. 
We commend the work they are 
carrying on and hope that their 
growth and development will con- 
tinue to be associated with that 
of Millsaps College. 



Judge Reed of the Supreme 
Court, will lecture to the Law 
Class in the near future. This 
is the first of a series of lec- 
tures by leading lawyers that will 
be given to the class during the 
session. 



THE GREATEST PRESENT NEED OF MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 



The greatest present need of Millsaps College is a dormitory. 
At present we can accommodate in the cottages, commonly known 
as ‘‘shacks,” about forty students. These accommodations are far 
from adequate for the college men we now have, since more than 
one hundred and twenty students have to board in private houses. 
Over these the college authorities have, in the very nature of the 
ease, very incomplete authority or supervision. Certainly both su- 
pervision and authority are not such as would be exercised over a 
dormitory on the college grounds, owned by the college and admin- 
istered solely in the interest of the college. 

There are four main reasons why it would be for the advantage 
of all concerned to have a large dormitory, owned and controlled by 
Millsaps College and situated on the campus. First, it would enable 
the authorities to olfer good board and lodgings to the students at 
lower cost than private boarding houses can afford for accommoda- 
tions of equal excellence. Boarding houses are not run for benevo- 
lence. There must be some profit in letting rooms and in furnishing 
meals, or people would not engage in it. It is well known that it is 
more profitable to run a large boarding house than to run a small 
one, other things being equal, because of the advantage obtained by 
buying in large quantities, and because the proportionate cost of 
administration is less. This where the houses are run for profit. 
The same principle would apply on a more extended scale, if the 
boarding house should supply a hundred or a hundred and fifty 
boarders, instead of twenty or thirty. The Kress stores are able to 
sell articles for surprisingly low prices because they buy on so great 
a scale. 

A large dormitory would make possible economies from whole- 
sale buying, and this reduction in the cost of living for each student 
would be applied to the board of the students, thus giving cheaper 
board to Millsaps boys than any private house could afford. The 
table could be run on the co-operative plan, and each student would 
;hen be charged only with the actual cost of his food, plus a very 
small proportionate part of the cost of service and management. 
This would give a rate far lower than any good boarding house 
could afford. 

A second reason lies in the fact that a dormitory would be a most 
potent factor in unifying our student body. Boys living in scattered 
houses with varying grades of accommodations can and do develop 
very little esprit de corps, very little of what is known as “college 
spirit.” This is a spirit of the greatest value in every worthy un- 
dertaking. We want a distinctive “Millsaps spirit,” a spirit which 
will make our students willing to undertake and carry through great 
things for Millsaps College. This means a devotion to the ideals 
which the institution was founded to foster, a devotion to the cause 
of Christian education, and to that service of the Church and the 
State which Christian education inculcates. We mean to make Mill- 
saps College not “the home of lost causes,” but the home and spring 
of worthy and winning causes. In union there is strength, and a 
dormitory would tend to unify and integrate our student body as 
nothing else can do. The multiplication of power by union in a 
worthy cause is shown, wherever the union occurs. While “one 
shall chase a thousand,” we are told that “two shall put ten thou- 
sand to flight.” Our student body lacks unity, and one reason for 
this — the main one, we believe — is to be found in the lack of some 
center of student life such as a dormitory would best give. 

And in this connection we will add that a unified student body 
will give us a body of united alumni, and a united body of alumni 
is the very strongest support that an institution can have. In addi- 
tion to which the union so brought about would enable the college 
to project and maintain its influence in an increasing degree in the 
spiritual and intellectual life of- our people. 

A third reason for building a dormitory is that the facilities so 
offered would increase the attendance of collegiate students. Some 
who would otherwise attend may be deterred by the cost of board 
and the conditions under which they would have to live, should a 



€be purple anD Z&b\tt 



5 



dormitory not be built. Wofford College was a small college of 
hardly three hundred students until the great Carlisle dormitory was 
built. As soon as the dormitory facilities were offered the college 
leaped forward in attendance, until now it has nearly five hundred 
students, and the college is of increasing power and influence in 
South Carolina. Millsaps ought to have five hundred students, and 
we believe that the greatest step toward gaining the increase desired 
would be taken if we could build a dormitory equal in capacity and 
equipment to Carlisle Hall at Wofford. 

Surely if our college is worthy of support at all we wish to in- 
crease its attendance and to extend its influence. A dormitory would 
do both, for the reasons herein set forth. 

A fourth reason is that the authorities of the college could better 
supervise and regulate the student life in its own dormitory than it 
can possibly do under present conditions. 

While the gift of the dormitory would be a benevolence in the 
sense that it would lessen the cost of an education at Millsaps Col- 
lege, it would be an asset of the college in more ways than those 
which we have set forth. By having a small fixed charge for room 
rent it could be made to pay a small per cent on the cost as an in- 
vestment. This is done in those institutions where dormitories exist. 

Randolph-Macon has already been provided with the John P. 
Branch dormitory, which accommodates eighty students. When this 
was built it was said to be best equipped dormitory at any Vir- 
ginia college. Trinity has dormitories which are perhaps the best 
in the Southern States. Wofford has the splendid Carlisle Hall, 
which cost $52,000, and which accommodates one hundred and sixty 
students. Emory College has planned a quadrangle to accommo- 
date four hundred students, and is now in process of building one 
side of it at a cost of $50,000. Central College, in Missouri, last year 
added to her dormitory facilities, until now she is ready to accom- 
modate one hundred and forty students. Southwestern has dormi- 
tories which are said to be ample and excellent. President Miller 
states that Hendrix College is planning, to build a $50,000 dormitory, 
and he was last week inspecting the Carlisle Hall of Wofford, as a 
possible iuodel. In addition to the accommodations in Wesley Hall 
and West Side Row, Vanderbilt has the fine Kissam Hall, which 
cost $140,000. 

Thus we see that all of the stronger male colleges of our church, 
with the exception of Hendrix College and Millsaps, have provided 
dormitories for their students, and we also see that Hendrix is mov- 
ing to remedy that defect in her equipment. Shall not Millsaps also 
move? 

Moreover, the other institutions in Mississippi which do work 
comparable to that of Millsaps have provided themselves with fine 
dormitories. Mississippi College has them, and so has the University 
of Mississippi. The same is true of the A. & M. College. We alone 
have none. We cannot think that our patrons and benefactors will 
consent longer to see us so handicapped. This article is written to 
call attention to the existing facts and to our greatest immediate 
need. 

The high scholarly rank of the College is evidenced by the ad- 
mission of Millsaps to the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States, at the recent session of that body 
in Spartanburg. S. C. 

At that meeting many educators in other states of the South 
said to the representative of Millsaps that our College is recognized 
as one of the most promising colleges in the whole South. That this 
promise may come to full and speedy fruition we bespeak the atten- 
tion of our friends, our patrons, and our benefactors to our needs, 
the most pressing of which we believe at this time to be a large and 
well equipped dormitory. 

And we beg leave to call attention to the fact that any building 
to be erected in our campus should be of such a size and style that it 
may adorn our campus when Millsaps has grown to be what we be- 
lieve she will be — one of the very foremost institutions in the whole 
country. A building is not a temporary thing. It will be in evi- 
dence a hundred years after all our heads lie in the dust. To fail to 









mm 












You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear^ at 



TT JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Kemngton's 










build, and to build in the near future, would cause us to lose a great 
opportunity to come to the forefront in education in Mississippi and 
the South. And to build a dormitory inadequate in size, equipment, 
and style would be evidence of a lack of faith in the future of our 
College. 

The present is a crucial time in the development of Millsaps Col- 
lege. In the past summer our agents in canvassing for students were 
met frequently with the objection that we have no dormitories ad- 
equate to accommodate our students — dormitories which would be 
under the supervision of the college authorities. And they found 
also that the eyes of the people of the State are turning more and 
I moVe to Millsaps as a most excellent place in which to educate boys. 
Now is our opportunity. Let there be no delay in providing our col- 
lege and your college with this most needed item of equipment. 

At the recent Convention of our Baptist brethren, held in Jack- 
son, the dominant note of the convention was determination to pro- 
"ide Mississippi College with what she most needs. The note of ad- 
vance sounded there was a trumpet call to a winning campaign. They 
ought to win what they need, and they will do it. ' Heaven bless 
them in their efforts! 

And we must do our part in the cause of Christian education, and 
see that Millsaps, the great hope of Methodist education in Mississip- 
pi, is equipped to keep the lead in this noble effort to attract and 
train men for every duty and opportunity which comes to them in 
j this growing country, and to stem the tide of materialism which 
[ threatens to dominate our people. Millsaps has wrought well in the 
past, and she only asks the spiritual and material support of her 
friends to go forward to greater influence and service in the future. 

NORTH MISS. CONFERENCE. 

Drs. Watkins and Sullivan Return 
With Good Reports. 

The reports brought back by 
Drs. Watkins and Sullivan from 
the North Mississippi Conference 
are very gratifying indeed. The 



spirit of enthusiasm and interest 
manifested in the college by the 
members of the conference is a 
source of just pride and pleasure 
to the students. 

Dr. Watkins and Dr. Sullivan 
both addressed the conference and 
made excellent reports concern- 
( Continued on page 6) 



6 



€bc purple anD ZQbite 



BRIEF HISTORY OF 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 



Some Facts Concerning Its Foun- 
dation and Growth. 



At the annual session of the 
Mississippi Conference in the City 
of Vicksburg, on December 7, 
1888, the following resolution was 
adopted : 

“Resolved, That a College for 
males, under the auspices and 
control of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. South, ought to be 
established at some central and 
accessible point in the State of 
Mississippi.” 

In accordance with this resolu- 
tion. the President of the Confer- 
ence, Bishop R. K. Hargrove, ap- 
pointed the following committee 



elected Professor of English. 
President Murrah took charge of 
the chair of Mental and Moral 
Philosophy. 

At a later meeting the Board of 
Trustees elected Mr. G. C. Swear- 
ingen Professor of Latin and 
Greek, and Rev. M. M. Black 
Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment. 

The first scholastic session be- 
gan on September 29, 1892. 

At the first meeting of the fac- 
ulty, Prof. W. L. Weber was 
elected Secretary of the faculty. 

At the meeting of the Board of 
Trustees in 1910, the office of 
Treasurer of the Faculty was ere- 
ated, and Dr. M. W. Swartz was 
elected to this position. 

The Board of Trustees at their 
regular meeting in June, 1893, 
elected Mr. A. M. Muckenfuss 



to confer with the North Missis 
sippi Conference in regard to the Professor of Chemistry and Phys- 
matter : Rev. T. L. Mellen. Rev. ics. 

W. C. Black, Rev. A. F. Watkins. The Department of History and 
Major R. W. Millsaps. Col. W. L. Modern Languages was formally 
Nugent, and Dr. Luther Sexton, established by action of the 
The North Mississippi Confer- Board of Trustees in June, 1897, 
ence. which met in Starkville. De- an< f Professor J. P. Hanner was 
cember 12, 1888. Bishop Gallo- elected to fill the chair thus cre- 
way presiding, on report of the ated- Subsequently the Depart 
action taken by the Mississippi men t 





'QCIETY 
PINS & 
EMBLEMS 



Conference, passed a similar res- 
olution. 

The following committee was 
appointed. Rev. J. J. Wheat, 
Rev. S. M. Thames, Rev. T. J. 



was divided. Mr. O. H. 
Moore was chosen Professor of 
Modern Languages and Mr. J. E. 
Walmsley was elected Professor 
of History and Economies. 

In 1908, the chair of Assistant 



Newell, Hon. G. D. Shands. Capt. in English and Latin in the Pre- 
D. L. Sweatman. and Mr. J. L. paratory Department was added, 
Streater. and Mr. S. G. Noble was elected 

At the first meeting of this joint to this position. 



At the commencement of 1911, 
the Board of Trustees created the 
office of Vice-President, and elect- 
ed Dr. J. M. Sullivan to this po- 
sition. At the same session of 
the Board, provision was made for 
an additional Professor in Science 
and Professor G. L. Harrell was 
chosen for this position. 

The organization indicated by 



committee in Jackson in January, 

1889. Major R. W. Millsaps pro- 
posed to give $50,000 to endow 
the institution, provided the 
Methodists of the State would 
give an equal sum. Bishop Chas. 

B. Galloway, assisted by Rev. A. 

F. Watkins, now President of the 
institution, and Rev. J. W. Cham- 
bers, by canvassing the State soon 
raised this amount. Whereupon j th:s rev ev. 

Major Millsaps immediately paid of nfiV.rs existing at 
over the $50,000 as promised. 

The work of the committee hav- 
ing been finished, it was dissolved 
and the Conferences elected a 
Board of Trustees, whose duty it 
should be to organize the college. 

Bishop Charles B. Galloway was , ment. 
president of this board. | At the close of the session of 

The Board held its first meeting 1910-11 the Preparatory Depart- 
in Jackson April 28. 1892. and be- ment was separated from the C'ol- 
gan the work of organizing a j lege and erected into a distinct 



E. YOUNG BURTON, A. B. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

University of Virginia, 1912; Grad- 
uate student, summer quarters, 1903 
and 1905; Graduate student in En- 
gineering Department, University of 
Wisconsin, summer term, 1909; Grad- 
uate student. University of Virginia, 
1908-09; Principal of Howell Insti- 
stute, Howell, Missouri, 1902-03; Prof, 
of Mathematics in St. Charles Mili- 
tary College, St. Charles, Mo., 1903- 
OS; Teacher of Math, in State Nor- 
mal, Kirksville, Mo., 1905-07; Supt. 
of St. Charles Military College, St. 
Charles, Mo., 1907-08; Asst, in Math., 
Univ. of Va., 1908-09; Commissioned 
Colonel, M. N. Co., by Joseph W. 
Folk; Member of Philosophical So- 
ciety, University of Virginia; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 



WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



Rensselaer 



Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



SCIENCE CLUB. 



Polytechnic 



Good Work Being Accomplished, j 

Under the direction of Dr. Sul- 
livan aud Pres. Lester, the Mill- 
saps College Science Club is do- 
ing a great work. It numbers 
among its members practically all 
of the members of both the Jun- 
ior and Senior Classes. The 
monthly meetings are always well 
attended and the programs well [ 
rendered. Interesting discussions 
of modern scientific questions 
make the meetings both profitable 
and entertaining. 

Dr. Sullivan is getting the 
members very enthusiastic over a 
number of scientific questions and 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. E.). fciccirical Engineering (E. L. 1 , and 
General Science ( 3. b . Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of gradua*es and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



they look forward eagerly to the 
^presents the status future meetings of the club. 

this time, j (Continued from page 5) 

though the personnel of the facul- 1 ing the conditions of the college. 



ty has been changed in several de- 
partments. 

In 1896. a Law Department was 
established. Hon. Edward Mayes 
was chosen Dean of this Depart- 



facultv. Rev. W. B. Murrah was 
elected President, Mr. N. A. Patil- 
lo was elected Professor of Mathe- 
matics, and Mr. W. L. Weber was 



institution under the name of 
Millsaps Preparatory School. Pro- 
fessor S. G. Noble was chosen 
Head Master. » 



It is particularly gratifying 
that the Board of Education in its 
report on the college recommend- 
ed very strongly that Millsaps be 
provided with a dormitory, a 
gymnasium and a Chair of Theol- 
ogy. 

The representatives of the col- 
lege are now in attendance on the [ 
Mississippi Conference and no 
one doubts hut that they will 
there meet the same cordial wel- 
come and hearty co-operation as 
at Greenwood. 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundr> T to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



€be purple ano Ctlfmc 



7 



The Most Enjoyable 




MORGAN ROBERTSON 

Morgan Robertson, famous writer of sea 
tales* says: 

‘ ‘ The able collaborator who has 
helped me over many a rough place, 
given me ideas when ideas were 
scarce, is none other than my old 
friend. Tuxedo Tobacco .” 




MALCOLM STRADSS 

Malcolm Strauss, well-known artist.says: 
"A pipeful of. Tuxedo gives 
added inspiration and encourage- 
ment. Besides, its mild flavor 
makes it a keenly enjoyable smoke. ’ ’ 



in the World 

E VERY man knows that pipe smoking is the 
ideal form in which to use tobacco. Only 
by smoking a pipe, can you get the full 
benefit and enjoyment from tobacco. 

And yet — thousands of men reluctantly deny 
themselves the pleasure of the pipe — because fancy 
“mixtures” and ordinary tobaccos bite the tongue, 
dry the throat and upset the nerves. 

It is not necessary longer to forego the pleas- 
ure a pipe can give you. 



^Tuxedo 

The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 

Tuxedo cannot bite the tongue or irritate the 
throat. The reason for this is that Tuxedo is made 
of only the mildest, choicest leaves of the highest 
grade, perfectly aged, Burley tobacco, by the 
famous “ Tuxedo process .” 

The '''‘Tuxedo process ” is a secret, known 
only to its manufacturers. 

It was discovered by Dr. R. A. Patterson, the 
founder of the R. A. Patterson Tobacco Co., after 
many years of experiment. Its popularity has never 
been artificially forced by sensational advertising. 
The demand has grown naturally and steadily , 
until now nearly eighty million packages are sold 
yearly. 

You can smoke Tuxedo in the office, on the 
street, and at home. It caftnot make you nervous; 
its aroma is delightful and it cannot smell up lace 
curtains or your clothes. 







YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 

Convenient poach* inner-lined C Famous green tin, with gold 1A 

with moisture-proof paper DC lettering, curvedtofitpockct 1 UC 



GARRETT P. SERVISS 

Garrett P. Serviss, prominent scientist 
and writer, author of "The Second De- 
luge," etc., says: 

“/ have tried many brands of 
tobacco, good, bad and indifferent, 
before alighting upon Tuxedo, the 
ideal smoke." 







^vavavaVaVavavavavava vavaCI 

2i^3l^ ' l l llll i pi l|| | |[ | li [ Bg 




&TiI 



Illustrations 
are about one- 
half size of 

real packages. 




Smoke 




CHARLES S. ASHLEY 

Charles S. Ashley, now serving his six. 
teenth term as Mayor of New Bedford, 
Mass., says: 

‘ ‘ Tuxedo strikes me as being the 
best pipe filler ever. A whole- 
some, enjoyable smoke.” 







LT. WM. H. SANTELMANN 

Lieut. William H. Santelmann, leader of 
the U. S. Marine Band, says: 



"I have used Tuxedo tobacco 
and found it to be a great luxury. 
It is a cool, sweet smoke and I take 
pleasure in recommending it to all 




WILLIAM P. SHERIDAN 



William P. Sheridan, one of the most 
famous detectives in the country, says: 

“ Tuxedo is so mighty fine, so 
superlative in its quality, its mild- 
ness and combined richness, that i, 
seems the ultimate and only tobacco 
for the connoisseur. I can recom- 
mend it unqualifiedly." 



8 



€be purple anD enftite 



BOBASHELA SUCCESS 

IS NOW ASSURED. 



MILLSAPS IN ORATORY. 



Last Year One of Many Victories. 



Members of the Staff Spend Busy 
Week — Reports Encouraging. 



The outlook for the Bobashela, 
the College Annual, is particular- 



Last year was a very successful 
one from an oratorial standpoint. 
Although we did not win first 
place in the M. I. 0. A. contest. 



ly bright. Never before in the his- j our man made a great fight for 
tory of this publication, has so | the honor and was awarded sec- 
much work been done on it at this J ond place by the judges. 



time of the year. Chief Scott, ad- 
hering to his determination of get- 
ting in a good part of the work 
before Christmas and of getting 
out the Annual earlier than usual 
has pushed the work with all the 
energy at his command and the 
results are forthcoming. 



Other victories serve to ap- 
pease what disappointment the 
students may have had over the 
loss of this first place. The Pur- 
ple and White triumphed over 
both Mississippi College and A. & 
M. College in the triangular de- 
bate. In addition to this, deba- 



The reports handed in by the , ters of the Sophomore Class won 
members of the staff at the meet- ] over the A. & M. Sophomores and 
ing held last week showed that the Preps won over C. H. A. The 
they have all been at work and only other inter-collegiate debate 
that they are receiving hearty participated in was the Millsaps- 
support from the students. Hendricks debate in which we 

Many of the pictures, including drew an adverse decision, 
the pictures of all the under class 
men, the Preachers’ League. Hon- 
or Council, and the co-eds have other colleges of the State at the 




been taken. 

G. H. Moore, the literary editor, 
reports that he has secured sev- 



J. REESE LIN 

Professor of History, Acting Professor 
of Social Science. 

A. B. Emory College; Fellow in 
Vanderbilt University, 1894-96, M. A., 
V. U., Supt. Wesson Public Schools, 
1899-1901; Supt. Natchez Schools, 
1901-07 ; Supt. Alexandria, (La.) 
Schools, 1907-09; Prof. Philosophy and 
Education, Central College, (Mo.), 
11909-10; Sage Fellow in Cornell Univ., 
. j j , ., , , I 1910-12; Instructor in Civics and His- 

Add to the above the fact that J tory, Univ. of Miss., summer terms, 
our man won the medal over the i 1902-3-4 ; Instructor in English Lit- 
erature and Psychology, Tulane Uni- 
versity, summer term of 1909; Stu- 



dent at Columbia 
terms of 1908-10. 



Univ., summer 



Mississippi Chautauqua Assem- 
bly held at Crystal Springs, and 
it is readilv seen that the state- 1 ENROLLMENT AT MILLSAPS. 



eral good stories and poems that | mer *i that last year was a success- 



will add much to the work. 

Miss Smith, the art editor, has 
been busy procuring some hand- 
some and appropriate drawings. 



ful one is not an idle boast 
Millsaps has always more than 
held her own in all inter-eollegi- 
ate debates. In the past history 



Jim Blount and Dorsey Wroten | °f I- O. contest she has won 
made good reports as law and seven firsts and three seconds out 



club editors, respectively. Ray, 



of seventeen tries. She has won 



the athletic editor, has been ! tlle Crystal Springs Chautauqua 
strictly on the job since his elec- medal so often that the winning 
tion and will come up with his °t d has come to be regarded as a 
work on time. "Millsaps trick.” 

The election for the statistics ! 
of the College has been pulled off 
under the direction of Editor 
Crockett, and many are anxiously 
awaiting the appearance of the 
Annual to see the “elected.” 

Weems, Lampton and McGee, 
the efficient business managers, 
in addition to signing a very fa- 
vorable contract with the Ham- ) 
mer-Smith Co., have been busy i 
looking up advertisers and pre- 
paring to collect levies from the 
students. 

Golden, the Prep editor, and j 
Spinks, the Prep Business* Mana- 
ger, are by no means behind their 
College colleagues, and are doing 
much to aid the work. 



Just as a matter of informa- 
tion we give below the enrollment 
of Millsaps College for a number 
of years, including almost every 
year in the history of the Col- 
lege: 

1892-93 149 




1893- 94 

1894- 95 

1895- 96 

1896- 97 
j 1897-98 
i 1898-99 
11899-00 



160 

204 

165 

206 

194 

165 

160 



1900- 01 204 1 

1901- 02 239 

1902- 03 255 

1903- 04 234 



! 1904-05 



305 



1905-06 231 



1907- 08 

1908- 09 

1909- 10 

1910- 11 

1911- 12 



295 

290 

226 

265 

290 



Paul Greenway made a visit to 
his home in Ridgeland Friday. 



The student body are respond- 
ing heartily to the requests of the 
staff to help get the work com- 
pleted and if the enthusiasm at 



The Right Reverend John 
Weems, better known as James 
JOHN MARVIN BU RTON, A. B., A. M. Tittlywinks Hi-Ki-Wi-Boy, spent 

several days of last week in Co- 

Tittly- 



Professor of Modern Languages. 



A. B. Randolph-Macon, 1909 , A. M., p ]a h county hunting (?) 

1910; Kappa Alpha; Sigma Upsilon. | ^ . 

, winks, says he bagged some fine 



this time is at all indicative of re- 1 tined to be numbered among the | game, the finest of which was a 
suits the Annual of 1913 is des- best in the history of the College, deer (dear). 



DON’T MAKE THE GREAT 
MISTAKE OF THINKING 
THAT ANY OLD KIND OF 
PIANO WILL DO FOR YOUR 
CHILD TO PRACTICE ON— [. 

How can you expect your child to 
learn real music when you buy some 
j cheap piano that is only made to sell 
and can never have or keep a correct 
tone. The great Paderewski once 
said: “If 1 can not get music out of 

a tin pan how can you expect a child 
to do so.” Take for example a child 
, can learn his A B C’s so well that he 
may be able to repeat them forward 
] or backward, but if you point out one 
letter in the center he is completely 
at sea and can’t tell what it is — it is 
] the same way with music if your 
j child learns the scale of notes upon 
a cheap, stenciled piano the ear is 
ruined and w r hen the scale is played 
upon a REAL piano there is such a 
| vast difference in tone that the child 
is lost. When choosing a piano, even 
to practice upon, select one that has 
a reputation for quality of tone and 
durability the difference in price will 
more than offset all other things in 
the one fact that you will have REAL 
MUSIC in your home and your child 
will learn the TRUE notes of the 
piano. 

Select for your home a 

KIMBALL 

piano or player piano and you will 
always have REAL MUSIC of the 
sweetest harmony. 

The name 

KIMBALL 

on a piano means more than a mere 
name — it stands for a reputation of 
over fifty years, and for pianos that 
have been awarded Gold Medals and 
Grand Prizes at both the Columbian 
Exposition and at the Alaska-Yukon 
Exposition over hundreds of other 
makes. This fact alone should show 
the superior QUALITY of the KIM- 
BALL piano. 

Right now is your opportunity to 
buy yourself and family a Kimball 
piano, for with our SPECIAL 
CHRISTMAS PRICES AND TERMS 
it is so easy. Do not delay longer; 
arrange to make your family happy 
with the one best gift for Xmas — A 
KIMBALL PIANO. 

The Hendrix 
Piano Co. 

240 E. Capitol St. 

Jackson, Mississippi. 





Che Purple anD QHfrite 



9 




Mifflin Wyatt Swartz, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Greek and Latin. 

Student, Univ. of Va., 1891-93; In- 
structor in English and History, 
Shenandoah Valley Academy, 1893-95 ; 
A. B., Univ. of Va., 1897, The Mason 
Fellow, 1899-00; M. A., 1900; Prof, of 
Greek and Latin, Fort Worth Univ., 
1900-03; Prof, of Greek and German, 
Milwaukee Academy, 1903-04; Prof, 
of Greek and Latin, Millsaps College, 
1904- ; Vice-Pres. for Miss, of the Clas- 
sical Association of the Middle West 
and South, 1908-09-10; Pres, of the 
Classical Association of Miss., 1908- 
1910; Graduate Univ. of Chicago, sum- 
mer quarters, 1907-08-09; Author of 
“A Topical Analysis of the Latin 
Verb,” a “Symposium on the Study of 
Greek and Latin,” a dissertation on 
“The Personal Characteristics of the 
Old in the Dramas of Euripides,” etc., 
etc.; Ph. D. Univ. of Va., 1910; Pi 
Kappa Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa. 



Got those problems — lemme 
copy them — Herman Johnson. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



No department of Millsaps has 
grown with more rapidity in pop- 
ular confidence than the depart- 
ment of law. For some years it 
was a burden to the college, but 
at last it has firmly established 
itself as self-sustaining. A pass- 
ing analysis discloses several rea- 
sons for this constant growth. 

As to location, the capital of 
the State naturally affords the 
best opportunity for the study of 
law. Here the student can see 
all the courts having jurisdiction 
in the State at work. The State 
library, conceded to be one of the 
very best in the Union, is his to 
use without reserve. Surely the 
young man could yearn for no 
more suitable place for the gene- 
sis of his career. 

Of its graduates — numbering 
as they do more than three hun- 
dred — never has there been a fail- 
ure in the bar examination. Not 
only have they made good in the 
first test, but also in the greater 
and more difficult legal problems 
with which the lawyer has to 
grapple. There is scarcely a coun- 
ty in Mississippi but that Millsaps 
can lay hands on one or more of 
its leading attorneys and claim 
them as her own. 

But great as is the prestige 
given by the success of the alum- 




SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SEUTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG., 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 



ni, there is another and greater 
reason why so many young men 
elect to take their course at Mill- 
saps. In no school in the South 
is there a more capable faculty. 
Both Judge Whitfield and Judge 
Harper have had every opportu- 
nity for becoming great instruc- 
tors. Added to a thorough and 
comprehensive study of the sub- 
ject are years of experience as 
lawyer, judge and instructor. It 
would be useless to multiply 



words in commendation of these 
distinguished gentlemen. So long 
have they been in the forefront 
of their profession they are 
known to all. 



Have T. B. Doxey do your tail- 
oring and save the special dis- 
count he gives the college boys. 



Just think only one more week 
before the holidays begin. Hur- 
ray ! 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS— R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

V 

Annie provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 





10 



Cf)c Purple anD TOite 



LOCALS. 



Miss Eloise Watkins is visiting 
in Hattiesburg. 



G. W. Hairston visited Kappa 
Sigma friends last week. 



We regret very much that 
Lloyd Gates has rheumatism. 



Some fellow wants to know 
why all the Profs, don’t go to 
conference. 



Well, Freshman, don’t you 
you think that it is about time to 
write Santa Claus that letter? 



Dr. Cunningham, of Nashville, 
spoke to a large audience in the 
Y. M. C. A. Hall Sunday night. 



Drs. Watkins and Sullivan at- 
tended the North Mississippi Con- 
ference several days of last 

"WcCk. 



Photographer: “Did you wish 
me to take your picture?” 
Brown: “N-No — I wanted to 

get one.” 



Rev. Mercer Green, of the Epis- 
copal Church of this city, con- 
ducted chapel exercises Tuesday 
morning of last week. 



Prof. Noble’s box of oranges 
have been enjoyed immensely — 
and the preps wish to thank him 
for his generosity. 



Ask Knox Brown how long it 
is until Christmas. He has it 
figured out to the seconds and 
can tell you at any minute. 



Dr. Watkins delivered a great 
sermon to a large, appreciative 
audience at the First Presbyterian I 
Church in Greenwood last Sun- j 
day. 



Some people we know have so 
much nerve that they would un- 
dertake to argue the suffrage 
question with a woman while out 
skiffriding in a self-rocking boat. 



Dr. Swartz (In Latin class) : 
“Miss Steen, what were some of 
the popular things Emperor 
Caligula did?” 

Miss Steen; “Gave a holiday.” 



Miss Shurlds (Reading a Soph- 
omore’s name written on a desk) : 



“Robert Harmon ’15.” “Now 
don’t you know that boy is lying, 
he looks every day of twenty. I 
don’t believe him.” 



A new phase of college activi- 
ties has been started up lately in 
the form of a boxing club at the 
[“Shacks.” So far only Weems 
and Howe have shown the ability 
to hand over a sleep-producing 
wallop. 



It is of special interest to Mill- 
saps students that our President, 
j Dr. A. F. Watkins, is Secretary 
of the Mississippi Conference 
[ which is meeting at Hazlehurst 
| this week. He is also Secretary 
j of the General Conference of the 
M. E. Church. South. 



There are no exceptions, Profs, 
may go to conference, thrones 
may totter or empires fall and 
1 fate may sow calamity and reap 
the whirlwind of destruction — 
still there is no cessation of clas- 
ses at Millsaps. 



Co-ed (Eating “kisses” in 
[ Prof. J. M. Burton ’s room) : 
‘ ‘ Professor, don ’t you want a 
! ‘kiss?’ ” 

Prof. Burton (with a blush) : 
“No. I thank you!” 

Co-ed (hastily) : “Oh, I mean 
a candy kiss.” 



Harry Lassiter’s smiling face 
has been absent from our ranks 
since Thanksgiving, and as no one 
has heard from him, we are some- 
what at loss to know the where- 
abouts of “Dot.” Maybe “She” 
needed him worse than we do. 



Among the students who took 
. the examinations for ministerial 
licenses at Greenwood last week, 
were : F. H. McGee, Melvin John- 
son and J. D. Wroten. We are 
very glad to hear that they suc- 
cessfully passed the examinations 
and are now full fledged “sort- 
ers.” 



Rev. E. T. Edmonds of the 
First Christian Church of this 
city, made the student body a 
very instructive talk at chapel 
exercises Wednesday morning. 
Dr. Edmonds chose for his sub- 
ject, “Efficiency,” and handled it 
in a manner to benefit everyone j 
present. 










MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 



FOR THE - YOUNG - MAN 

“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s 
Clothing, representing the highest standard of 
workmanship and tailoring. We guarantee a per- 
fect fit and the quality will please you. 

Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the city. 
COME TO SEE US 

DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
jcall at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
. tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work,- only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangurn will take care of your orders for your Recep- . 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



V- 



Cfre Purple anO White 



11 



COURIER STAFF ELECTED. 



Commencement Daily Will Be Ed- 
ited by Good Men. 



Geo. H. Moore, Editor; Cain, As- 
sociate Editor ; McGee, Business 

Manager. 

At a meeting of the Senior j 
Class the following members of 
the class were elected to the Com- 
mencement Courier staff : 

G. H. Moore — Editor-in-Chief. 

W. M. Cain — Associate Editor. 

Miss Janie Linfield — Social Ed- 1 
itor. 

J. B. Kirkland, H. H. Lester — 
Reporters. 

F. H. McGee — Business Mana- 
ger. 

J. D. Wroten. J. B. Honeycutt 
— Assistant Business Managers. 

It can be said without fear of 
contradiction- that a better staff 
could not possibly have 




THE DANIEL STUDIO 



Prof Harrel (In Physics class) : 
“Mr. Weems, which produces the 
highest note, the bass drum or 
the snare drum?” 

Mr. Weems: “I don’t know, 

‘Fessor. ’ The bass drum makes 
the biggest noise.” 




George Lott Harrell, B. S., M. S. 
Professor of Physics. 

B. S. Millsaps College, 1899; M. S. 
Ibid, 1901; Prof, of Science, Whit- 
worth College, 1899-1900; Prof, of 
Physics and Chemistry, Hendrix Col- 
lege, 1900-02; Prof, of Physics and 
Chemistry, Centenary College, 1902- 
04; Prof, of Mathematics and Astron- 
been om y, Epworth University, 1904-08; 

. j „ , . I Prof, of Mathematics and Astronomy, 

selected. George Moore is one j centenary College, 1908-09; President 

of the best students in college and of Mansfield College, 1909-10; Prof, of 

is considered one of the best read ; h ; Prof, of Mathematics, Louisiana 

men who has graduated at Mill- 1 state University, summer, 1911; Tau 
. -rr . .1 Delta Omicron. 

saps tor some years. He is a wil- 
ling and competent worker, and 
there is no doubt that he will 
make the Courier everything it 
should be. Moore is fortunate in 
having associated with him W. M. 

Cain, one of the leading members 
of the Senior Class, and one who 
will do all he can toward making 
the paper a success. 

Miss Linfield, as one of the so- 
cial leaders among the co-eds, will 
make an efficient social editor. 

Kirkland and Lester are both 
active workers and they are sure 
to be on the scene if there is a 
possibility of getting a good story. 

Lester will no doubt prove to be 
an adept on exclusive ones. 

No one who knows the man, 
doubts F. H. McGee’s business 
ability. With him at the head of 
the business department, we feel 
sure that the affairs of the Cou- 
rier will be handled on strictly 
business principles. In Wroten 
and Honeycutt, McGee has two j stuart Gra y son Noble > A - B - A - M - 1 
assistants equal to anv who could Head ?****' 

have been chosen. 

A. B. Univ. of N. C., 1907; Grad- 
uate student, Univ. of Chicago, sum- 
mers 1908-09-10; A. M. Univ. of Chi- 
cago, 1910; Instructor English and 
History, Homer Military School, 1907- 
OS; Member of Miss. Teachers’ Asso- 
ciation; Classical Association of Mid- 
dle West and South; National Educa - 1 
tional Association; Vice-President of 
Miss. Classical Association; Secreta- 
ry of M. I. T. A., 1909; Vice-Pres., 
1910; Author of a series of articles on 
the “Agricultural High School of the 
South;” Pi Kappa Alpha; Sigma Up- 
silon. 



We are sorry to report Mrs. 
Mary B. Clark, our Assistant Li- 
brarian, on the sick list this 
week. We sincerely hope she 
will soon recover and be back at 
her post of duty. Her ever 
pleasant face is greatly missed 
by the students. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes yoa 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



MANHATTAN HAT CLEANING COMPANY 

Expert Hat Cleaners from New Orleans, Louisiana. 
WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

All Kinds of Hats Cleaned, Blocked and Retrimmed in the Latest 
Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

202 West Capitol Street. 




FROM THE PENMANSHIP DEPARTMENT 

OF 

HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY, 
JACKSON, MISS. 



WE MAKE HIGH GRADE ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS 
AND KINDS. 

Our collections of individuals include fruits, flowers, figures 
and designs suitable for any occasion. 

Brick and Neapolitan we make in any combination of flavors 
and colors desired. 

Write us what you want and when you want it to arrive and 
we will do the rest. 

CARLOSS ICE COMPANY 

(INCORPORATED) 

Manufacturers of ICE AND ICE CREAM. 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



12 



Che Purple attO White 



THE HAIR WILL BE CUT. 
Our Reporter Interviews Hon. 

Barbarous Soph, Grand Sach- 
em of the Haircutters Associa- 
tion of Millsaps, U. S. A. 

As Dec. 21st draws near there 
is much bustle and bluster on 
Millsaps campus. The hardware 
and headwear stores are doing a 
rushing business in order that an 
event of moment may be pulled 
off successfully about that date. 
Our reporter learns from one of 
our leading merchants that he 
has had more calls for hair-clip- 
pers and skull caps in the past 
few days than he could fill. The 
printing offices report that the 
doctors are sending in hurry calls 
for health certificate blanks. 
Everybody will be prepared. 

Our reporter, meeting Hon. 
Barb. Soph on the campus, put 
this question to him: 

“Do you really intend to cut 
all Freshmen’s hair as stated in 
your proclamation in the Purple 
and White, or is this only a 
bluff?” 

Hon. Soph replied with hesita- 
tion: “Certainly the Freshmen’s 
hair will be cut. Far be it from 
us to keep the Freshies in fear 
and trembling unnecessarily. Let 
me repeat: The hair will be 

cut.” 

“But don’t you think it is 
rather cold to turn these children 
loose without any hair to protect 
their heads? Won’t their brains 
freeze?” he was asked. 

“Not the least danger. It is im- 
possible to freeze nothing. The 
contents of a vacum are unfreeza- 
ble. HoAvever, for those who fear 
for their health, a remedy has 
been provided, as was stated in 
our proclamation. The presenta- 
tion of a doctor’s certificate, as 
outlined in the proclamation, re- 
lieves the presenter from the ne- 
cessity of the cutting. I might 
add that Jim McClure, D. T. 
Paige, Tatum Twins, Hermon 
Johnson and Bill Moore have pre- 
sented certificates, which are be- 
ing considered. But there is still 
hair to cut.” 

Our reporter thanked our es- 
teemed citizen and as he passed 
on he heard a shivering figure 
murmur : 

“Cold! Oh so cold! Let me 
hasten to the doctor’s office ere 
it is too late. Cut my beautiful 
hair? Never! I will swear I 
have only one lung and go with- 
out my meals a week before it 
shall be cut!” 



(Continued from page 1) 
doers of the word and not hear- 
ers only.” We were reminded 
that one of the greatest leaders 
of Protestantism did not thor- 
oughly approve the attitude of 
James. But this is perhaps natur- j 
al in Luther because, living in the 
age that he did. he was no doubt 
disgusted with the vain works 
and shallow pretenses of the im- 
moral leaders of the Church. It ! 
I was a time when the man who | 
sought the true religion must | 
turn away from works alone and | 
seek a spiritual uplift by faith in j 
the blood of a dying Savior. 

But it was not only a gospel of 
j works that James taught but a i 
| gospel of faith and works. [ 
“Show me,” he said, “your faith 
without your works and I will 
show you my faith by my works.” 
The people had followed the j 
teachings of Paul in regard to 
faith until they had almost for- ■ 
got that works were necessary. 
Like Luther, in a revulsion of 
feeling against the vain works 
of the past centuries they car- 
ried thoughts to the other ex- J 
treme and would, seeminglv. have 
j this practical Christian writer, I 
lived by faith alone. 

In following up the thought of j 
this practical Christian writer, 
Dr. Watkins discussed some ques- 
tions relative to Christianity. Is 
it a philosophy? Certainly not. j 
Philosophers have lived, entered ; 
into the very depths of thought, j 
and passed away without com- j 
prehending the first principle of 
a Christian life. Is it a science ? 
Perhaps so. inasmuch as a science 
teaches men. how to do the things 
they wish to do. but with it no 
other science may be compared. 
The Bible in its turn may be and 
is a text book, but the most en- 
traordinarv one the world has 
1 ever known. It is the exposition 
of the science of a holy life, while 
Christianity is the art of holy liv- 
ing. These two factors in the 
spiritual development of man- 
kind teach a man not only how 
to die, but bow to live. Christ- 
ianity is an intensely practical I 
thing. It can not be merely a 
science showing men that - which 
they ought to do but it must be 
a living, vital force that compels 
men to work for the cause of 
Christ. 

Bringing the discussion to a 
local sphere, the speaker said j 
that the college man should be 
mot only a hearer but a doer also. | 



With all the advantages of mod- 
ern education it is imperative for 
the student to be an active, vigor- 
ous force in shaping the best in- 
fluences of his surroundings. How 
may we do this? How may we 
make the, atmosphere at Millsaps 
better? Simply by beginning 
with our own lives and making ; 
them better each day. 



The Association was very glad 
to have Dr. Watkins address it 
and hopes to have him again 
soon. 




George W. Huddleston, A. B., M. A. , 
Assistant Master Prep. Dept. 

A. B. Hiawasse College, 1883 ; Prof, 
of Greek Hiawassee College, 1884-91; I 
A. M. Hiawasse College, 1886; Prof, 
of Latin and Greek, Harperville Col- 
lege, 1891-93; Principal Dixon High 1 
School, 1893-97 ; Associate Principal, 
Harperville College, 1897-99; Asso- 
ciate Principal, Carthage School, 1899- 
1900; Pres. State Board of Examiners. 



F. V. Homes left for his home 
in Memphis Sunday night. 







ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A. M. 



A. M. Centenary College, 1970; Pres- 
and Prof., Port Gibson Female Col- 
lege, 1867-73; Prof. Whitworth Col- 



lege, 1872-93 ; Head Master Millsaps j 
Preparatory Dept., 1893-1911; Phi 
Kappa Sigma. 



The second Lyceum attraction 
which came last Tuesday evening 
was witnessed by a large, en- 
thusiastic audience. Everyone 
departed feeling well repaid for 
the small cost and trouble to at- 
tend the entertainment. 



13 

Girard 2 % in. Milton 2 % in. 

AHR-OW 

COLLARS 

15c each, 2 for 25c 

Cluett, Peabody & Company, Makers 



Bowers & McMaster 

For High Grade 
Medium Priced 

Gents’ Furnishings 
and Shoes 

212 W. Capitol St. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 



"Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day 'and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 





Cbt purple anD White 



13 



GEOLOGY TRIP. 



Seniors Enjoy Trip to Interesting 

Points — Dr. Sullivan Conducts 

the Party. 

One of the most interesting and 
best conducted departments in 
Millsaps is that of geology. Dr. 
Sullivan, the head of this depart- 
ment, has made an extensive 
study of this subject and endeav- 
ors to put it before the students 
in the most interesting manner. 
Each year he takes them on sev- 
eral trips in order to study the 
subject in the field. The first 
trip of this session, while not an 
extended one, brought before the 
students many interesting facts 
with reference to the geological 
formations in the vicinity of Jack- 
son. This trip was taken a short 
time ago to Byram and Rosemary, 
Miss., nine and thirteen miles re- 1 
spectively, from Jackson. 

The class left Jackson about 
9 :00 A. M., reaching Byram short- 
ly afterward, but they were not 
able to remain long, as the train 
to Rosemary, which they wished 
to take, arrived shortly after- 1 
wards. However, they were able 



to make some observations upon 
the limestone and fossilitic forma- 
tions there. 

At Rosemary they were able to 
remain longer and to make a very 
close examination of a sandstone 
formation along a creek there. 
Besides being interesting geolog- 
ically, some very good scenery is 
to be had there. 

After seeing everything around 
Rosemary that there was to be 
seen, the class determined to 
walk two miles to Terry to catch 
a train which would put them 
back in Jackson several hours 
be°ore the one from Rosemary. 

I erybody caught the train, al- 
though some of them narrowly | 
missed being left in Terry. They 
got back to Jackson rather tired 
and hungry, but unanimously 
agreed that they had a highly in- 
teresting time. 

Those who took the trip were : 
Dr. Sullivan, Caruthers Sullivan. 1 
Miss Smith, Boswell, Kirkland, 
Lampton, Lester, Moore, Scott, 
Weems, McGee, Morse and Ray. 

The Freshmen — an eternal 
question ! 




Albert Hall Whitfield, A. M., L. L. D. 



Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, 
Evidence, Law of Corporations, Law 
of Real Estate, Constitutional Law, 
and Law and Practice in Federal 
Courts. 

University of Mississippi, A. B., 
1871; A. M„ Univ. of Miss., 1873; 
L. L. B., 1874; L. L. D. 1895; Adjunct 
Prof, of Greek, University of Miss., 
1871-74; Prof, of Law, Univ. of Miss., 
1892-94; Ex-Chief Justice of Supreme 
Court of Miss.; D. K. E. 



After the push-bell on one of 
the n§w cars had rung several 
times, George Barrett wanted to 
know why someone didn’t an- 
swer the phone. 



Y. M. C. A. 

J. T. Weems Gives An Interesting 
Talk. 

It was again on Friday night 
last when we were forced to ask 
j one of our own number to take 
charge of the program. An ad- 
dress by the Rev. Mr. King, pas- 
tor of the Second Baptist Church, 
was expected with much interest, 
the students having a strong ad- 
miration for this worthy pastor 
and his forceful manner of speak- 
ing. It was learned at a late hour 
that he could not come. However, 
the Association prides jtself on 
the fact that it has quite a num- 
ber of men in its own ranks who 
are not only willing to speak for 
us but are capable of giving us 
interesting discussions of vital 
questions. Mr. Weems is among 
the number of the most forceful 
speakers and strongest men. To 
him the committee naturally turn- 
ed in the selection of a man. 

He chose as his subject a part 
of the last chapter of Galatians, 
especially these words: “Be not 
deceived; God is not mocked; for 

(Continued on page 16) 



The Best Employ merit! 



Si 

tse 

IK 



The Civil Service, without doubt, offers the best opportunity to ambitious young people, and especially 
young men. 

The Government is short of good male stenographers. Read below an extract of a circular of the Civil 
Service Commission: “The Commission has been unable to supply the demand for MALE stenographers 

and typewriters, especially in Washington, D. C. Young men who are willing to accept appointment at an 
entrance salary of $840 to $900 per annum have an excellent* opportunity of appointment. Advancement of 
capable appointees is reasonably rapid. The Government Service offers a desirable field to bright and ambi- 
tious young men.” 

Read the following letter from a successful student of Draughon’s College: 

Manager, Draughon’s Business College, “Washington, D. C., 4-26, 1912. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Sir: 

This is to thank you again, also your assistant for the attention I received at your hands when I was in 
your town last summer, taking the stenographer’s and typewriter’s examination. I made an average on the 
examination of which I am proud and received appointment in the Bureau of Yards and Docks on the 18th of 
September, 1911, at $1,000 per annum. Not so bad for a beginner in the shorthand world, and I expect to re- 
ceive promotions from time to time as there are vacancies occuring right along in the field and departmental 
service. 

If you think this information will be of any interest to the students attending your school who contem- 
plate taking the Government examination, I would like for you to pass this letter around for them to read, as 
I am from Woodville, Miss., consequently am anxious to see Mississippi fully represented in the Government 
Departments. There are more educational facilities in Washington than any other city I know of and being 
in the Government Service going to work at 9 o’clock and out at 4:30 o’clock, one has lots of spare time to 
improve himself. IT IS UP TO THE INDIVIDUAL ENTIRELY. 

Thanking you again for past courtesies and trusting the above information will be inspiring to some one in 
your school, I remain, Very truly yours, 

(Signed) J. A. HUFF, Former student of Draughon’s College.” 



We are making a specialty of preparing students for the Civil Service examinations in Shorthand -and 
Typewriting. You should take up the work at once and prepare for the next examination. UNCLE SAM’S 
PAY DAY COMES REGULARLY. Address 

Draughon's Practical Business College, Jackson, Mississippi 

teach by mail. If interested in mail course, write for catalogue. 




14 



MILLSAPS PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL. 



During the session of 1910-11 
the Preparatory Department of 
the College was organized into the 
Millsaps Preparatory School. The 
school was installed in Pounder’s 
Hall, a building adequate in every 
way for the home of such an in- 
stitution. All boarding students 
were required to room and take 
their meals in the building, and 
a system of discipline suited to 
the needs of secondary students 
was adopted. 

The first year the experiment 
proved successful beyond the 
shadow of a doubt. The remark- 
able improvement, the efficiency 
of the discipline, and the improve- 
ment in the quality of the work 
done, all pointed toward success. 
The satisfaction of the students 
and their unity of spirit was es- 
pecially gratifying. 

At the beginning of the present 
session, both faculty and students 
entered with renewed vigor upon 
the discharge of their duties. The 
course of study was extended to 
cover four years, thus furnishing 
the advantages of a first class 
secondary school to all who cared 
to enroll. The need of such a 
school is plain from a comparison 
of the increase of enrollment dur- 
ing the past three years. The en- 
rollment this year is 94 and bids 
fair to reach 110 ; last year it was 
100 and the year previous, 84. 
This year almost the entire en- 
rollment is still in attendance; 
last year many came who did not 
remain long. The increased use- 
fulness of the school is clearly 
evident, in spite of the wide- 
spread establishment of agricul- 
tural high schools in the State. 

The unity of spirit among the 
students deserves comment. To a 
man they enthusiastically stand j 
up for their school. They zealous- 
ly enter into their literary activi- 
ties, their athletic contests and 
their class-room work. Such sat- 
isfaction is seldom found in any 
student body. Prof. Noble de- 
serves to be congratulated on the 
high standing which the school 
has assumed. 

President’s Report. 

(Continued from page 3) 
ped gymnasium, which, if under 
the auspices of the Young Men’s 
Christian Association, will enable 
this organization, while minister- 
ing to . the physical well-being of | 



Cbc ffutple anD CTitc 




WILLIAM R. HARPER. 



Contracts, Torts, Personal Property, 
Pleading, Commercial Law, Equity, 
Jurisprudence, and Equity Procedure. 

Graduate University of Mississippi; 
Harvard Law School; Delta Tau 
Delta. 



the student body, to increase its 
influence over them for good. 

Thirdly, there should be estab- 
lished as soon as possible a chair 
of Biblical Theology. We would 
not be understood as desiring to 
keep our students from attending 
the Theological Department of 
Vanderbilt. We would encourage 
them to attend this school; but 
we would also furnish more com- 
prehensive instruction in the Bi- 
ble and kindred subjects to those 
of our young preachers who find 
it impossible to take a post-grad- 
uate course in Theology. It is be- 
lieved that the example set in this 
matter by many of our best in- 
stitutions of learning might well 
be followed by Millsaps College. 
It may be that the interest awak- 
ened by the coming of our Cen- 
tennial Anniversary will make for 
the supply of some of these wants, 
or that some generous hearted 
Methodist in the State will fur- 
nish the means for their supply. 

It is pleasant to be able to an- 
nounce that the deportment of the 
students has been admirable. 
There are, of course, a few trif- 
lers; but in the main an earnest 
purpose is manifest in the student 
body to improve the opportunities 
they enjoy. No finer body of 
young men can be found any- 
where than those who assemble 
from day to day in the class 
rooms of Millsaps College. 

An earnest effort is being made 
to minister to the religious life of 
the students. Nearly all of them 



1 

are members of the Church anc 
very large proportion of them r< 
ularly attend Sunday School, j . 
of them are required to atte 
| church. The Young Men’s Chri 
ian Association is actively at wo 
and Bible and Mission study cl 
ses have been organized. 

Those intrusted with the adm 
istration of the affairs of the C 
lege take great pride in the re 


a tion that it sustains to the Church, 
;g- and we earnestly ask, and confi- 
\11 dently expect, the sympathy and 
nd co-operation of the Methodists of 
st- the State, and especially of the 
rk members of the two great govejrn- 
as- ing bodies under which it must 
work out its destiny. We are per- 
in- suaded that next to its own merit 
ol- there is no influence so vital to its 
a- 1 success as the affection and active 


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daily For You 


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your measure, built and modeled to fit you perfectly. 

Suits or Overcoats made to Order 

Best Fit £j* 1 Best Assortment 

Best Values Best Service 

Others at $16.50, $18, $20, $22.50, & $25 


STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

E. Capitol and President St. Jackson, Miss. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 




Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R- W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R, L. Saunders, S. J. Johns*'" 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Pbiv 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpsor 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 n 



15 



Cfre Purple anD CO&ite 



support of the preachers of the 
Conferences. 

Our greatest peril is that we 
shall be satisfied with our past 
successes in attendance and equip- 
ment and fail to realize that this 
is but the beginning of the work 
that the College must do for the 
Church. 

Earnestly requesting your pray- 
erful co-operation in this work, 
and invoking the blessing of God 
upon your deliberations, 

Your Brother in Christ, 

A. F. WATKINS. 

Jackson, Miss.. Nov. 27, 1912. 



BASKET BALL. 



Team Puts Up Good Games But 
Loses. 



The basket ball boys returned 
Saturday night, having spent the 
week at Ellisville, Laurel, and 
Newton. A series of fine games 
was played on this trip, the first 



J with Ellisville A. H. S. The score 
there was 20 to 15 against our 
; boys. This defeat was due to the 
fact that our boys were not used 
to playing on a sandy court. The 
uext two games were played with 
the Laurel Y. M. C. A. The first 
game was acknowledged by all 
to be the fastest game ever play- 
ed on the Y. M. C. A. court there. 
The score at the end of the first 
half was 18 to 12 in favor of our 
boys, and they would have beat- 
en them easily if their opponents 
J had not put in new men. The 
score at the end of the game was 
35 to 28 in favor of the Y. M. C. 
A. The second game with the Y. 
M. C. A. was a very hard fought 
game. Although our boys lost, 
they are to be congratulated on 
the way they fought these giants 
who have played the game for 
many years. 

The team then went to C. M. C., 
where it met defeat in two more 
games. The first game was play- 




FRONT OFFICE 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing every modern 
filing device. Connected by interior telephones with departments. 



Big F 


resh Stock of 


- 


HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 

PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



ed in the rain. On account of the 
j court being very muddy, and also 
on account of the severe treat- 
ment received at the hands of the 
Laurel Y. M. C. A. giants, our 
boys were in a poor condition to 
play'. Handicapped in this way 
they stiH put up a great fight, 
holding them to a score of 18 to 
16. In the second, and last game 
of the trip, our boys started in at 
a rapid gait but the fates seemed 
f to be against them. 

Although our team was defeat- 
ed in these games, we should not 
feel discouraged, but look for- 
ward to the return games with 
great anticipation. 

The men who went on the trip 
were : Kirkland, Gaddis, Har- 
mon, N. B., Harmon, Robt., Fra- 
zier, Jones, Cook, Coach Fletcher 
and Prof. J. M. Burton. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



Galloways Hold Interesting Ses- 
sion — Society Decides Against 
Monroe Doctrine. 



The Society met at its regular 
time on- Friday night with Pres- 
ident Lampton in the chair. Af- 
ter the opening exercises and 
some small matters of business 
the regular program was taken 
up. The declaimer was unfortu- 
nately absent, but the orator, R. 
G. Moore, was present with a 
strong and forceful oration. The 
question for regular debate was: 

Resolved, That the Monroe 
Doctrine should be retained 36 a 
part of our permanent foreign 
policy. 

As first speaker on the affirma- 
tive, O’Donnel gave evidence 
showing that its retention would 
be for the best interests not only 
of the South and Central Ameri- 
can states, but of our own nation 
as well. 

The first speaker on the nega- 
tive explained that the conditions 
no longer existed that called for 
the Monroe Doctrine. Tatum, W. 
S., responded for the affirmative 
with some strong argument. Sil- 
verstein took up the gauntlet for 
the negative in his turn, followed 
by Howe, who summed up the ar- 
gument for the affirmative with 
some strong facts. Cain, W. M., 
rounded up the facts on the neg- 
ative in a forceful way, showing 
that this was a narrow policy for 
which there was no need and that 
it was likely to prove harmful 
both to our Southern neighbors 



and to us. The question was de- 
cided in favor of the negative. 

A very important question was 
decided on the impromptu debate 
discussed by Broomfield and Cara- 
way. Owing to the prominence 
of the subject we refrain from 
mentioning it. Howe was elected 
orator. By motion, the house ad- 
journed. 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



Special Program Tonight. 

The Lamar’s held a very short 
session Friday night — an im- 
promptu debate was freely in- 
dulged in by the members pres- 
ent. A special program will be 
j rendered Friday night, Dec. 13, 
j in which a number of the best 
speakers of the Socity will parti- 
pate. 

A large and enthusiastic au- 
dience is expected. 

ANDREWS SCHOOL 
DESKS 



Satisfactory Service Guaranteed. 




Recently Installed in 

Millsaps Preparatory 
School 



Write for prices and Catalogue. 



Also Auditorium Seating, 
Chairs, etc. 

Southern School Book 
Depository 



JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 



Quality First 

FIRST CLASS Workmanship at 
reasonable prices rule here. But even 
at that, the price is a SECONDARY 
consideration with us. 

QUALITY FIRST, ALL 
THE TIME 

ROBB & CONANT Studio 

4231/2 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



16 



Cftg Purple anp fflbitt 




BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



S. P. McRAE 

Has Snellenber Clothes, Stetson 
Hats, Just Wright Shoes, Leonard 
& Benbow Shoes, Silver and Eagle 
Brand Collars, Ides’ Shirts. 
Special Prices to College Boys. 
214 West Capitol Street 
Near the Union Depot 



W. F. WEST 

PRACTICAL 

MERCHANT 

TAILOR 

124 W. Capitol. New Phone 583 
Messina New Bldg., Upstairs 

Jackson, - - - Mississippi 

Visit A. J. ORKIN’S 
Jewelry Store 
for fine 

Christmas Presents. 

We are Leaders in Low 
Prices. 

206 West Capitol Street. 



(Continued from page 13) 
whatsoever a man soweth, that 
shall he -also reap. For he that 
soweth to the flesh shall of the 
flesh reap corruption, but he that I 
soweth to the spirit shall of the | 
spirit reap everlasting life. ’ ’ The 
speaker took as his viewpoint the 
words just as they read and not 
as some seem to take them, name- 
ly: That whatsoever a man sow- 
eth that shall his children reap. 
It is for the man himself to reap 
the fullest rewards of his own 
conduct. Were it entirely so that 
man receives from an ancestry all 
the vital forces and ruling pas- 
sions of his life, then would it 
take from him that power given 
to him when God created him in 
his own image — the power to 
choose his own course in life. 
Nevertheless, it is a fact that the 
human being has within his na- 
ture enough of transmitted de- 
pravity to drag him down if he 
will allow it. But here comes the 
test of the real man whether or 
not by his will he can subdue 
these things to his own control. 
Yet, none the less it is the duty 
of all not to hinder the progress 
of future generations by trans- 
mitting any evil tendencies to 
them whether it be of mind, body, 
or soul. 

It is an interesting fact that 
when Paul, the man of the cities 
and artificial life, should turn to 
the natural world for an example 
that should apply to the lives of 
men. The illustration was a 
forceful one not only in the nat- 
ural world hut also in the spirit- 
ual world. It is no more natural 
that the seed planted in the earth 
will bring forth of its kind than 
that the seeds of sin and deprav- 
ity when planted in the hearts of 
men will spring up to their des- 
truction. 

The great pity of these things 
is the hold they get upon the life 
of a man. At first he hesitates to 
do those things such as drinking 
and swearing hut later they so 
sweep away the moral strength of 
his will until he does not hesitate 
to do the vilest things. 

But the most glorious fact con- 
nected with this passage is that 
it applies to good as well as evil. 
If instead of sowing wild oats, the 
young man will take care to im- 
plant within his life only those 
things that tend toward good then 
in the harvest time, great will be 
his joy when he can come bring- 
ing his sheaves with him. 



THE 

“ WHO M ADE-THEM FOR YOU ” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
’ Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 

$6 and $8.50 



PRICE 



j $15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$1.50, $1.75, $2 
TRY THEM 







QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 


VoL V. 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1912. 


No. II 


MA CAN’T VOTE. 


WOMAN SUFFRAGE. 


WHEN MA VOTES. 



I. 

Ma’s a graduate of college, and 
she’s read most everything; 

She can talk in French and Ger- 
man, she can paint and she 
can sing. 

Beautiful? She’s like a picture! 
When she talks she makes 
you think 

Of the sweetest kind of music, 
and she doesn’t smoke or 
drink. 

Ohri I cair’t begin to tell you all 
the poems she can quote; 

She knows more than half the 
lawyers do ; but ma can ’t 
vote. 

II. 

When my pa is writing letters, 
ma must always linger near 

To assist him in his spelling and 
to make his meaning clear. 

If he needs advice, her judgment, 
he admits, is always best; 

Every day she gives him pointers, 
mostly of his own request. 

She keeps track of registration, 
and is taxed on bonds and 
stocks, 

But she never gets a look-in at the 
sacred ballot box. 

III. 

Ma is wiser than our coachman, 
for he’s not a graduate. 

And I doubt if he could tell you 
who is governing the state. 

He has never studied grammar, 
and I’ll bet he- doesn’t know 

Whether Caesar lived a thousand 
or two thousand years ago. 

He could never tell us how to 
keep the ship of state afloat, 

For he doesen’t know there's such 

a thing — but ma can’t vote. 

• ' - - ■ 

IV. 

Mrs. Gaskins does our washing, 
for she has to help along, 

Taking care of her six children, 
tho her husband’s big and 
strong. 

When he gets a job, he only holds ! 
it till he draws his pay, 

Then he spends his cash for 
(Continued on page 3) 



Co-eds Favor Equality at the Polls. 



There is no more burning question occupying the minds of men 
today than that of woman suffrage. This question has many very 
ardent advocates and also many opponents. Since this issue of The 
Purple and White is edited wholly by the Co-eds it is appropriate 
j that some of the arguments for Women’s Rights should occupy a 
I prominent place in its columns. 

Women should have the right to vote, first, because her natural 
right to the franchise is every whit as good as that of a man’s. She 
must obey the law and pay taxes the same as a man. She should 
therefore have equal voice in the making of the laws, and in the 
‘ levying and expenditure of the taxes. Ours is not a democracy until 
woman is allowed her place of full equality with man before the law. 

Furthermore, legislation for the protection of children would 
be more easily secured if women had the franchise. In Colorado, 
where women vote, they have the most advanced laws of any state 
for the protection of the home and children. A number of reform 
measures have been introduced almost wholly by the vote of women, 
such as' an industrial school for girls; an excellent pure food law; 
factory inspection ; a traveling state library ; compulsory education ; 
the local option bill; and many others, so that the District Attorney 
of Denver says: “The experience of seventeen years has fully vin- 

dicated the justness and wisdom of extending the voting franchise 
to women.’’ 

Among the arguments most often advanced against woman suf- 
frage we hear the so-called “unanswerable argument,” the “indif- 
ference of the average good American woman to the privilege of ; 
voting.” If this is not a fallacy we have an unanswerable argument 
against all movements and reforms for public good. A century ago 
it was an unheard-of thing for a girl to be sent to college and when 
the agitation for the higher education <Jf women was begun the in- 
difference of the world at large was astounding. Yet this indiffer- 
ence was not called an “unanswerable argument” against it. The 
indifference towards child labor reforms is shameful. But no one 
call-s this indifference an “unanswerable argument” against child 
labor laws. If therefore the indifference felt for the education of ; 
women when the question first began to be discussed was not per- 1 
mitted to put a quietus upon the movement ; and if the question of 
child labor is being pushed to the front today in spite of and in the 
face of an almost overwhelming indifference in some quarters, should 
the indifference of some people to woman suffrage be considered a 
strong and convincing argument against the movement? Certainly 
it should not be so considered, for woman suffrage like every other 
good movement is ruled not by any set of indifferent people but 
by the large class of those who know and love justice. 

The question is often asked, “Why should woman care to vote? 
She is represented at the polls by the male members of the family.” 
To us this is the most foolish question any one could ask; for the 
same man who makes this remark will admit that his vote expresses 
his political views and not those of his wife. If it is simply repre- 
sentation that is necessary or desirable why is it not as just for man j 
to vote by proxy as for woman? It’s a poor rule that won’t work j 
both ways. 

Another argument often used against woman suffrage is that 
(Continued on page 4) 



Little Willie looked up inquir- 
ingly into his mother’s face and 
said, “Ma, you aint goin’ to the 
polls and vote, I hope. You know 
pa said any self-respqctin ’ woman 
wouldn’t do that, becaue there is 
j so awfully much to be done at 
home.” 

“Yes, my dear, I feel that it is 
my duty to go and help my sis- 
ters in the mighty work of up- 
j building our nation,” anwered 
| the woman to her little six year 
old son. “And you must attend 
to your little sister while I* am 
gone, and be a good little boy for 
mama.” 

Little Willie gave a deep sigh 
and said, “I do hope you can ar- 
range to get home before dark be- 
cause I will be so lonesome. How 
I wish my little sister was just big 
enough to play with my blocks 
and picture books -with me, but 
she can ’t even crawl yet. ’ ’ 

Just then there was 
knock at the door and Willie went 
to answer the call. “Oh. come in 
Mrs. Jenkins,” the little one said. 
“I guess you and ma are going 
up to lift the poles today. You 
know ma is just crazy about you 
but she is jealous of all your fine 
clothes. She said she was going 
to get in some office and then she 
could get fine dresses like you 
and • drive two big grey horses. 
You know ma could look a lor 
better if she ever stayed at home 
long enough to make her dres- 
ses. ’ ’ 

Mrs. Jenkins, all this time was 
listening eagerly to what the lit- 
tle boy had to say and said, “Wil- 
lie, does your mama cook good?” 

“Well, er, no, not every time,” 
the boy said. “She has lost all 
interest in everything but her 
magazines and books. She said 
the other day she wanted to be 
well posted, so she could 
any of pa’s arguments on 
votin’ business, 
actually forgot to 
and when pa came 
brought a friend 




2 



Cbe purple ano gx3bite 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern .Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon...... Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

B. F. Foster Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage..... President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby.... Secretary 

W. S. Burns ..Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T t Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis .Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery.; President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice president 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. C. Willingham Vice President 

C. Bullock Treasurer 

T. L. C arraway Secretary 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton president 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage president 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison : Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

J3L--L. Carraway FTesidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount ...Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 
Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

Anniversarian 
Anniversary Orator 
illsaps-Hendrix Debater 
, Jr. 

..Mid-Session Debaters 

V - 



C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 
J. B. Kirkland 



MY REPORT. 



When I first looked at my report 
My head began to “rise,” 



I saw the matter from one side, 
From my own point of view. 

And seeing thus I thought, 

I did not get my due. 



Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager j 

L. H. Gates Football Manager | 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester : President j 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 



Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief | 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. VlES? '. ’. Business Managers 

HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

Clerk 



seen her fly around. I had been 
playing all day in the hack yard 
and had so much mud on my 
face pa said to the vistor, ‘He 
is our yard boy.’ Then I cried 
because I knew pa was ashamed 
of me and I was doing just the 
thing to please ma when I went 
in the back yard to play. She 
wanted everybody to be real quiet 
so she could read her magazines. 
But I just can’t please them both, 
no matter how hard I try.” 



For there was a neat little ‘ ‘ one, ’ ’ 
Staring me in the eyes. 

Looking further I saw a “two,” 
Which was to be expected 
“I can’t expect to be perfect,” I 
said. 

Not in the least dejected. 

In my report again I looked. 

And what I saw amazed me, 

The matter was getting serious 
now, 

For I had made a “three.” 



But when I calmly thought it o’er 
I realized my mistake. 

For surely teachers couldn’t give 
grades I did not make. 

Some classes I had “cut,” 

| In some had made zero, 

And then expected credit, 

For things I did not know. 

Disgrace lies not in failure, 

As I now realize, 



I thought I was disgraced, 

When I espied a “four,” 

I crushed the paper in my hand 
And looked at it no more. 

I felt my anger rising fast, 
Against the Faculty, 

Why had they thus conspired 
To make such sport of me? 



| But in not attempting, 

Each time you fall, to rise. 

| Looking into the future, 

I see my next report, 

Bearing the grades I wish, 

J Earned by honest effort. 

— Ignorant Co-ed. 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



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WE SAVE YOU MONEY. 

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Styles. Felt Hats Cleaned and Blocked from 50c to $1.00. Derbys 
from 25c to $1.25. Opera Hats Cleaned and Pressed 50c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. GIVE US A TRIAL. 

, 202 West Capitol Street. 



GENERALLY SPEAKING. 



“Generally speaking a woman,” 

Prof. Brown smiled at the class. 

Near-sighted and fussy they 
thought him. 

They smiled at him — each pretty 
lass. 

“Generally speaking a woman,” 

He coughed and his features 
turned red. 

“Generally speaking a woman 

Is generally speaking,” he said. 

—Ex. 



Hey diddle, diddle, 

The man in the middle, 

He can ’t see over the plume ; 
The little man paid, 

To see the show. 

But the Hat ran away with 
the room. 



Big F 


resh Stock of 




HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



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i 



THE SOPH’S DEFEAT. 



A FEW REMARKS ABOUT 

“ME.” 



DIRECTORY 



Oh ! Sophomore stop and ponder 1 I. 

long, Jim Hill, Bill Harriman and I. 

E’er you shave the Freshman’s Why we are mighty men, 

heads. We have built many a railroad, 

For I’m very sure, when you’ve Put big deals thru, and then 
heard my song II. 

You’ll beware of shearing eo-eds. We studied the conditions, 

II. Political and such. 

In another college not long ago, Got facts on foreign things you 
Was made this same decree, see, 

And the way it ended was full of French, English, Russian. Dutch, 
woe. III. 



For the ones who did the deed. 
III. 



While at Cornell they told me 
The wavs of this old nation 



The day arrived' and all were j I feel, with such instruction. 



there ; 

One Sophomore stood with tears ; 



The importance of my station. 
IV. 



The trembling co-eds clutched Why Napoleon wasn’t much you 
their hair I know. 

And stood with falling tears. | They told me at Cornell, 

IV. That after Waterloo, old Nap 

They bound a eo-ed to a chair, ! Said things not nice to tell. 

One Sophomore was selected, V. 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. GOTTEN 

DENTIST 

21414 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



To take the hair pins out her hair ! And when Victoria was queen. 
So it fell down unprotected. The way England was ruled, 
V. Was something just appaling. 

A hair pin here, a hair pin there, I could have had her fooled. 



At last when all were out, 

A veil of wavy, lovely hair, 
Fell gloriously about. 

IV. 



VI. 

At Cornell they have r 
down. 

My excellent daily grade, 



have marked 



Now one stepped forward with And on exam most every time 
the shears A hundred then I made. 

To cut that lovely hair. VII. 

But when he saw her pleading I’m a very modest man you see. 

tears. But if you really want my “Rep” 

He said. “I do not dare.” Write to Cornell and ask them 

VII. If ] ever was a “Prep.” 

And in her wavy scented hair By an Attentive Co-ed. 

He buried deep his face, j — 

They knew his heart was also I PREP LOCALS. 



tears. 

He said, “I do not dare.” 

VII. 

And in her wavy scented hair 
He buried deep his face, 

They knew his heart was al 
there, 

So sp’ared her for his sake. 

VIII. 

But listen now, my tale’s n 
done. 



Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210J4 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

T. O. BYRD, Prop. 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. F. P. WALKER 



bo spared her for his sake. | Prof. Noble (In English class: 

VIII. | “Mr. Johnson, are you sure that 

But listen now. my tale’s not Duncan was killed on the stage? 

done. j Johnson: “Well, no sir, I am 

The worst I’ve yet to tell you, J not sure, but you said he was. 

This was the fate of number one. , . r~i 

-vht,- 4 , ; . T m Anyone desiring a shoe shine, 

Mith number two I’ll greet you. ... , % r „. _. 

j-g. I win please notify McKie. or Bis- 

« i, • • , , . ... I mingham. at room 47. Thev are 



A hair pin here, a hair pin there ; 

At last there were no more, 

When off came one long string of 
hair ! 

The rest fell on the floor. 

X. 

The Sophomores looked upon the 
head, 

Where hair there was no more. 

“I think you got in bad.” she 
said, 

“My hair’s been cut before.” 

XI. 

The . next day all .the Sophs were 
lain 

(Continued on page 4) 



The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON, MISS. 



OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 

Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. ! 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom BuiUlng. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 

LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



always on the job. 

On last Friday the Sophomore 
Class had the pleasure of seeing 
Dr. Kern lift a poodle dog from 
his table in the lecture room. 

Query : Why did the dog 

choose the sophomore class? 

(Continued from page 1) 
whiskey, or else gambles it 
away. 

I suppose his brain’s no bigger 
than the brain of any goat. 
And he’d trade his ballot for a 
drink — but ma ean’t vote! 



MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 



BON-T ON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



4 



Cite Purple anD SHfrite 



£bz l?urple anD QUfiite 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott -Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One y'ear’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



SPECIAL STAFF FOR THIS ISSUE. 

Miss Janie Linfield Editor-in-Chief 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen .Asst. Editor 
Miss Hortense Smith - Social Editor 



Miss Fannie Buck, 

Local Editors 
Miss Henrietta Lowther, 



Miss Mary Shurlds. Y. M. C. A. Editor 
Miss Warrene Harris-Athletic Editor 
Miss Bessie Easterling-Spe. Reporter 



Miss Sue Beth Sullivan, 

Prep Editors 

Miss Olive Watkins, 



The regular staff deserves no credit 
for this issue. It is gotten out solely 
by the Co-eds, and to them is due the 
credit. They have wrought well and 
we congratulate them. 

THE REGULAR EDITORS. 



APROPOS THE SEASON. 



At this good time of the year, 
what a flood of sweet memories 
rushes into our minds at the men- 
tion of the joyous Christmas-tide. 
How the hearts of all yield to the 
message. ‘‘On Earth Peace — ,” 
it has a meaning stronger than 
mere sentiment. Amid all the 
good cheer, let us not forget this 
festival is also a sacred time, for 
we commemorate a Savior born, 
and it was with the rising of that 
star that the world’s hope was 
realized. Why should it not he 
the time most filled with love and 
joy? In our own happiness, how- 
ever, let us not forget others less 
fortunate, and let us practice 
meekness, gentleness, forgiveness, 
and that purity, which were by 
the angel’ song breathed into the 
world at his command and exalted 
by Him in His teaching. Forever, 
O Earth, repeat the angelic 
st+ain ; and Thou, O Star of Beth- 
lehem, shine on forever! 



Although more than nineteen 
hundred years have elapsed since 
the Star appeared in the East to 
lead the Magi to the Redeemer’s 
cradle, the mysterious rays still 
shed their holy light over the 
Christ child lying in the manger. 

In order that God might teach 
man the greatness of love. He 
became a ehild and again we hear 
the wise men saying. “Where is 
He. that is born King of the Jews, 
for we have seen His Star in the 
East and have come to worship 
Him.” Again we listen to the an- 
I gelic strains. “Glory to God in the 
Highest !’’ 

The present Christmas opens 
with more hope and a brighter 
outlook than ever to the future of 
the upbuild and rise of our earth. 
■Great events have marked the 
passing of the last year. The gos- 
pel has been spread far and wide 
to the remotest corners of the 
earth and the people are offering ! 
prayers of gratitude for such ful- 
fillment of universal prayer. 
China has become a republic and i 
this of itself ranks among the 1 
greatest events in the history of j 
the world. We, here at home. I 
have cause for gratitude, for oth- 
ers have been plunged in the 
depths of war. But already an j 
arrangement for peace has been 
made. More and more, warfare 
has come to be looked upon as a 
relic of barbarism and as a 
method of settling disputes en- 
tirely unworthy of the present 
standard of civilization. It will 
only be settled when all the rnling j 
powers shall adjust their affairs ' 
by arbitration. We shall look to 
a glorious, future for peace, when 
all the nations of the earth shall 
sing on a glad Christmas day, j 
“Glory to God in the Highest, 
and on earth Peace, good will to- j 
ward men.” 

Ask the Freshman Co-eds 
where the store is? 

(Continued from page 3) 

All stretched upon the bed. 

The doctor said “Hair on the 
brain. 

And weakness in the head.” 

The fair co-ed would rather wed 
Than go to teaching school. 

In fact, so much she’s often said: 
She’s frankness as a rule — 

But college guys are far too wise : | 
They fear a Suffragette. 

And so the learned maiden sighs 
And teaches, waiting yet. 

—Ex. I 



(Continued from page 1) 

man is more fitted by his occupation to manage city and state af- 
fairs than woman is. This is a very broad assertion and is rather 
a one-sided view to take. Man’s business may teach him to direct 
some departments of government more accurately but common sense 
teaches that woman’s work as a housekeeper and mother makes her 
more efficient in the regulation of other departments. She. seeing 
the evils of the lack of such things, would bring It about that we 
have cleaner streets and shops, better inspection of food, a cleaner 
and better supply of milk and water, well ventilated school rooms 
and reasonable laws affcting child labor. It is said that woman’s 
place is the home. Grant that this is so. Then we see very clearly 
that if she directs the home properly the experience thus acquired 
will qualify her in an eminent degree to exereise the ballot for the 
proper and exact regulation of those specific municipal affairs which 

we have just mentioned. 

We often hear also that if woman could vote her influence for 
good would be lessened. The attitude of liquor dealers towards 
woman suffrage is good evidence against this objection. For it. has 
been proved in suffrage states that woman’s influence with the vote 
exceeds her influence without the vote. In Colorado, before women 
could use the ballot the question of prohibition or local option could 
never even get a hearing. But since ivomen have voted, the local 
option bill has been passed and very many counties are now dry. 

Furthermore, it is said that women would be contaminated by 
mixing with men at the polls. This is not true. She would not lose 
her purity and loveliness by voting. She would, however, elevate 
and purify the polling places. For since woman’s presence has 
aided every other organization it stands to reason her presence at 
the polls would elevate politics also. 

These are by no means all of the arguments set forth by those 
opposing woman suffrage, but the rest are, like the ones we have 
mentioned — simply arguments and not reason. 

At the last election, three and possibly four, states — Michigan 
being contested — crossed the line and this year there were just twice 
as many delegates at the convention in Philadlpliia as there were 
last year. And in our own state, Mississippi, in the past year the 
membership of the suffrage league has been completely doubled— 
besides the hundreds we cannot reach. Taking into consideration 
the growth of the movement from the start and especially the mar- 
velous increase of the past few years, it is safe, we believe, to say 
that next year six more states, at least, will line up on the side of 
right and justice and within five years, at most, women in the Unit- 
ed States will be equal, before the law, to men. 



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LEO E. COHN, Manager. 



Cl )c purple anD Wibite 



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The All Time Smoke — 




WILLIAM F. MURRAY 



Congressman William F. Murray of Boston, 
Mass., who, in addition to other distinctions, is 
the youngest member of Congress, says : 



‘ ' In my recent campaign for 
Congress, I had occasion to speak 
many times nightly. I found that 
Tuxedo tobacco and a good pipe 
have a very soothing effect on the 
vocal chords after a hard speaking 
tour. ' ' 










C. D. WILLIAMS 



C. D. Williams, the illustrator, whose color 
work has earned him an international reputation, 

says: 

"When designing the composi- 
tion of a picture, I find it easier 
to concentrate my attention on the 
work if I smoke Tuxedo. It is a 
wonderfully sweet, cool smoke in 
my meerschaum." 

J2jZ. „ 



Tuxedo 

M ORNING and afternoon a man must keep 
his body and brain in tune. That’s effici- 
ency, and a good, pure tobacco — Tuxedo 
— is an excellent pace maker. 

A few whiffs in the morning clear your brain 
and concentrate it on yourwork. In the afternoon, 
many a good long steady pull at the pipe keeps that 
concentration keyed just right. 

At night, after a good day’s level-headed work, sit 
back in your easy chair at home and get the solace and 
relaxation that comes from a big calabash of T uxedo. 
That’s the true history of many a Tuxedo day. 




Tuxedo is unique, individual. It’s the only 
tobacco that stimulates and soothes without a bite 
or sting or an irritation. 

Business men find Tuxedo helpful. Authors 
and journalists smoke it while they write. Singers 
use it before and after performances. Doctors 
enjoy it and recimmend it. 

Try a week of Tuxedo. Smoke it in your 
pipe, or roll it into the best cigarettes you ever 
smoked. Either way, or both ways, for a week, 
and you’ll have the best smoke week in your life I 

YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 

Famous green tin, with gold 1 A Convenient pouch, inner-lined 
letterinf.curved to fit pocket 1UC with moisture-proof paper DC 




RICHARD HENRY LITTLE 

Richard Henry Little, the distinguished 
war correspondent, author and humorist, says : 
" I have found Tuxedo a faith- 
ful companion in the field and in 
the camp." 








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BENJAMIN M. NEWBOLD 



Benjamin M. New bold. District Passenger 
Agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Wash- 
ing, D C , says : 

'* There are no flaws in Tuxedo 
and a targe number of virtues — 
purity, coolness, mildness, fra- 
grance — all are present in generous 
measure. ’ ’ 




A. C. HARRINGTON 

A. C. Harringto", Sale* Manager of the 
Packard Motor Car Co., New York City', says: 

“ Personally, I telieve Tm one 
of the original Tuxedo fans. I 
stnoke it to the exclusion of all 
other brands." 




James Montgorruir' , au*or of the success- 
ful farce, “Reacy Money,” now running at Max- 
ine Elliott's Theatre, Nrw York Ci.y, says: 

“ Tuxedo is a fine, natural 
tobacco, a s love burning, mild, 
sweet stnoke. I always use 
Tuxedo." 




6 



€fte purple anD SOIjite 



A BIOGRAPHY. 



When Alfred Allen was two years old, 

He was worth — to his parents — his weight in gold. 

Did ever before a child so small 
Say ‘da da’ or so soon learn to crawl? 

And would you believe it, the older he grew 
His precocity increased — and his temper too ! 

In primary department, at the country school. 

He knew all his lessons but would break one rule, 

For he’d sometimes slip apples to blue eyed Marilla, 

(You see from the first he was a gay lady killer). 

* In all grammar grades his studies were joys, 

Then too, he delighted in licking Big Boys. 

In high school his literary genius soon dawned, 

Diamond Dick and his pals he always scorned. 

As his friends he chose Chaucer. Milton and such, 

And studied them faithfully, really too much. 

For when at John Hopkins he first appeared, 

The professors were bluffed, non-plussed and ‘skeered’ 
They had heard young Napolean in the literary world. 

And feared from their pedestals they’d quickly be hurled. 
Before he’d been there an entire school year , 

He left all the students ‘way back in the rear. 

He was philosopher, orator, editor, poet, 

When told he was smart, his reply was “I know it.” 

He entered an essay once for a prize 
And won a medal so big when he dies 
He can use it nicely as a tomb stone, 

Or if he goes broke t ’would be good for considerable loan. 
True t’was rather a one sided affair, 

For no one else entered — they did not dare ! 

His triumphs were manifold you see, 

And he graduated with a BIG A. M., Ph. D. 

To think he did all this with his PEN. 

Don’t tell me about these LITERARY MEN! 

Soon he decided to go abroad, 

And on the way he met a real live LORD. 

He chased Literature to its lair, 

And learned all its secrets while there. 

Now he imparts his knowledge to US, 

And indulges occasionally in a great fuss. 

Often over the Shakespeare Club he sheds his light. 

And delivers lectures that are VERY bright. 

What title has come with his fame — can you guess? 

The Right Honorable DIPPY; who told you? Yes! 

Each year at Christmas it is said 

He will surely return from vacation- — WED. 

But thus far he" has made an announcement brief, 

Which brought from all Co-eds a great sigh of relief. 

Once again there’s a chime of a Christmas Bell. 

And thP year — but, ahem, you never can tell! 



— An Admiring Co-ed. 




CO-EDS VS. FACULTY. 



The fact that the co-eds have 
organized their basket ball team 
and that it is a good one was de- 
monstrated last week in the gym- 
nasium when they defeated the 
faculty by a large score. Not- 
withstanding the fact that the 
faculty had some former stars on 
it’s team, they were unable to 
cope with the zealous co-eds. 

The game started in a very fast 
and impressive manner and up 
until the second half was very 
close and hard fought. ‘‘Long 
John.” an old time star, held the 
co-ed’s centre. Miss McGehee, 
with his long arms outstretched 
thus preventing her from being 



much aid to her team, as a centre. 
He could not, however, keep her 
from throwing a few goals over 
his head. 

‘‘Mose” surrounded Miss Buck 
to a good advantage and “Dip- 
py” stood by Miss Lester. 
“Ducky” Lin guarded Miss Tay- 
lor as though she were private 
property — thus keeping her from 
making a single goal. The first 
half ended 40 to 22 in favor of 
the co-eds. 

In the second half things be- 
gan to take place with surprising 
rapidity, the co-eds taking the 
lead from beginning. How they 
succeeded in rattling the faculty 
we are unable to say but rattle 
them they did. “Dippy” was the 




FRONT OFFICE 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing every modern 
filing device. Connected by interior telephones with departments. 




SKY LIGHT ROOM SHOWING WORKMEN 

A. v. SEUTTER’S NEW PHOTO STUDIO 

IN THE WEST END SEUTTER BLDG,, 112 CAPITOL ST. 

This Gallery is the largest in the State and one of the largest 
and best equipped in the South, where you can get high grade work 
at reasonable prices, made by some of the most expert Photographers 
in the profession. 

If you wish pictures, kindly come, and if you do not, kindly come 
and see our pictures. 

Very respectfully, 

A. v. SEUTTER 

112 CAPITOL STREET 2nd FLOOR. 



[ 





Cfre Purple anD tflbitt 



7 



first to lose his head. This hap- 
pened in an attempt to keep up 
with Miss Lester, stumbling over 
“Ducky.” “Ducky” followed 
after “losing four buttons from 
his vest.” “Long John,” “Mose” 
and “E. Y. ” were not far behind 
him. 

Thus the co-eds had things go- 
ing their way and they proceed- 
ed to take advantage of it. No 
mercy was shown the faculty. 
Goals, goals, goals, in front of 
them — goals behind them — six 
hundred goals were made by the 
co-eds. 

Mrs. Chisolm, the official score 
keeper found it a difficult task to 
record the score as fast as it was 
made. When finally the time 
keeper did call a halt it was 
found that the score stood 379 to 
121 in favor of the co-eds. Six 
(Continued on page 9) 

Quality First 

FIRST CLASS Workmanship at 
reasonable prices rule here. But even 
at that, the price is a SECONDARY 
consideration with us. 

QUALITY FIRST, ALL 
THE TIME 

ROBB & CONANT Studio 

423J/2 E- Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds. 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout hath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 

person is made. 

v. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Speaker, Edwards. Subject : 
“Christ and the Woman of 
Samaria. ’ ’ 



Those people who were present 
at the last meeting of the Y. M. 
i C. A. enjoyed to the fullest ex- 
tent the address made by R. C 
; Edwards. Although this is Ed- 
wards’ first year in the college, 
he is a speaker of great ability, 
having won a reputation for him- 
| self in the Preparatory School 
where he was the winner of sev- 
( eral debates for that branch of 
the college. 

Edwards chose the following 
text “If thou knewest the gift 
of God. thou wouldest not ask 
who it was that gave to thee.”| 
The text is taken from the fourth 
chapter of John, in that part 
where Christ talks with the wo- j 
man of Samaria at Jacob’s well. 

The speaker began by telling ! 
how the people had the wrong 
conception of Christ ’s kingdom. , 
thinking it was an earthly king- [ 
dom, and how Christ left Jeru- j 
salem and went into the rural dis- 
tricts of Judea to teach the com- 
mon people. When Christ saw j 
that these people would not listen 
to him either, he decided to re- 
turn to Galilee and to labor there 
until a more convenient day. In 
going from Judea to Galilee, it 
was necessary that Christ pass 
through Samaria, the people of 
which country the Jews despised, 
thinking them to be an inferior 
people. Therefore they refused 
to give their gospel to the Sama- 
ritans. Here the speaker said 
that in the same way college stu- 
dents refuse to give the gospel to 
their fellow students by not ask- 
ing them to go to the Y. M. C. A. 
and to Sunday school. 

Christ, the perfect man, had no ; 
such feelings toward the Samari- j 
tans as the Jews did. and instead 
of scorning the woman whom he 
met at the well, he spoke to her, 
and in the course of conversation 
caused her to realize her sinful 
condition and to confess her sins. 
In the same way, the first thing 
that any sinner must do is to real- 
ize his condition and then, in or- 
der that he might be saved, to 
confess his sins to Jesus Christ. 




You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 

& JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Aenn/notons 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 




TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 




Wanted — A private secretary 
to look after love affairs. Apply 
to The Head Master of the Mill- 
saps Preparatory School. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

B. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 




8 



Che purple anD mbitt 



LOCALS. 



“Alls well that ends well.” 



“Broken glasses are easier 
mended than a broken heart.” 



Here’s wishing you a merry 
Christmas and a successful New 
Year. 



Miss Linfield spent Sunday and 
Monday of last week in Hazle- 
hurst. 



Can our revered seniors find 
“ d-e-b-a-t-o-r-s ” in the Blue Back 
Speller ? 



Mr. Backstrom is rejoicing that 
he received a check before his re- 
port went home. 



Dr. Swartz spent Saturday in 
Hazlehurst. Needless to say his 
classes rejoiced. 



Dr. B. Y. Burton spent several 
days last week in New Orleans 
and Hazlehurst. 



W. N. Thomas, of the class of 
’12, visited friends and frat mates 
on the campus last week. 



Mr. Linfield while on his way 
to conference stopped over a few 
hours with his daughter. 



Miss Viola Brabston of Vicks- 
burg, Miss McGehee’s visitor, 
was on the campus last week. 



Dr. Watkins and Dr. Sullivan 
attended Conference at Hazle- 
hurst the latter part of last week. 



Have T. B. Doxey do your tail- 
oring and save the special dis- 
count he gives to college boys. 



We are sorry that Leon Mc- 
Cluer’s sugar cane is all gone but 
come on “Kush” with thb goob- 
ers. 



During Dr. Watkins’ absence 
Dr. Swartz, with his well known 
executive ability, filled the office 
of president. 



Dr. Kern (to Freshman Eng- 
lish class) : “The boy kicked the 
ball against the fence which ran 
around the field.” 



“How many fools does it take 
to make two columns of locals in 
the Purple and White?” was 



a question asked one of the local 
editors. 



Suffragette (to prep) : “Re- 
member, my dear, if you are a 
good girl and study hard you 
may be president of the United 
States some day.” 



Olive Watkins: “Where are 

you going to?” 

Sue Sullivan: “Now that I 

have come to think about it, I 
don’t know.” 



We understand the Y. & M. V. 
Railroad transports passengers 
who have lost their tickets. For 
further information apply to the 
Rev. Melville Johnson. 



What kind of a class 
Would this class be 
If every member 
Were just like me? 

— McNeil Twins. 



Foster: “Bobbie. I hear yovi 

have become quite a Sunday 
school worker.” 

Burns: “Yes. I mean to work 

’em for a Christmas present.” 



A Millsaps Freshman wrote to 
an athletic publication earnestly 
inquiring what he should do to 
win a hundred yard dash. 

“Run a little faster than the 
other fellow.” replied the editor. 



A new lot of Pennants and Sofa 
Pillows have just been received 
by the Millsaps Book Depository. 
A reproduction of the main build- 
ing is a specialty. Call today and 
get your Christmas supply. 



Under the management of 
Count Alex Watkins, Jr., several 
famous musicians have formed an 
orchestra. This orchestra con- 
sists of : 

First Violinist — Duke E. .Her- 
bert. 

First Violinist — Senator R. 

Stirling. 

Second Violinist — Senator W. 
H. Perry. 

Harpist — Lord Fritz Fant. 

Mandolinist — Count Alex Wat- 
kins. 

Pianist — The Pink Lady. 

We are glad to announce to the 
students that The Pink Lady Or- 
chestra will soon make its first 
appearance in the South at Mill- 
saps College. We predict for it 
a brilliant" career. 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart. Cash er. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis,- Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable," corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our' messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




Cfte Purple artD Mite 



9 



MISS LJNFIELD ENTER- 
TAINS. 



One of the most delightful so- 
cial events of the year was on 
Saturday night, Dec. 6, when 
Miss Janie Linfield charmingly 
entertained a few friends at the 
attractive home of Dr. and Mrs. 
M. W. Swartz on the campus. 

The evening’s gayety began 
when the young gentlemen were 
bidden to choose their partners 
from a group of ghostly statues. 
Much fun was derived from this 
unique arrangement and strange 
to say each one seemed to find the 
exact girl, he was looking for, al- 
though they were so well dis- 
guised. 

A clever guessing contest was 
much enjoyed, after which the 
young people were served with 
delicious refreshments. 

Those present were : Misses 

B. G. Steen, E. K. Steen, Harmon, 
Elizabeth Watkins, Pattie Sulli- 
van, Brahston and McGehee. 
Messrs. McLure, Lampton, Hen- 
ry, Broomfield, McNeil, McNeil, 
Gathings and Fant. 



LATIN GRAMMAR. 



Rule I. Transitive compounds 
of “trans,” take two accusative 
— one dependent upon the lesson; 
the other, upon the pupil. 

Rule n. Verbs meaning failed 
take the blues and go home, as a 
clause of result. 

Rule III. Verbs meaning to 
rejoice take the accusative with 
distinction. 

Rule TV. Ablative when used 
with Latin takes the accompani- 
ment of brains. 

Rule V. Compounds of “ab,” 
“de,” “ex,” etc., take dative of 
separation when referring to 



Latin in general. 

Rule VI. Lessons on Monday 
take the ablative with attendant 
circumstances. 

Rule VII. Ablative of degree 
of difference denotes the differ- 
ence between thinking and know- 
ing. 

Rule VIII. Latin when used as 
an elective takes your breath. 



A LIST FOR SANTA CLAUS. 



Votes for Women — Hortense 
Smith. 

A Set of Spoons— Henrietta 
Lowther. 

Magic Curlers — Bessie Easter- 
ling. 

Kress Kisses — Mary McAlpin. 

A Co-ed Classmate — lone 
Green. 

A Bow and Arrow — Stella Me- 
Gehee. 

A Stray Latin Paper — Freda 
McNeal. 

A Letter from Cairo — Vivian 
Carlisle. 

More Time — Ella Kate Steen. 

Palms — Evelyn Spickard. 

An Order — Fannie Buck. 

A Short Story — Birdie Grey 
Steen. 

An Opportunity — Evelyn Ed- 
monds. 

A Star — Rose Howard. 

An Aeroplane — Alice James. 

Ein Bueh — Marjorie Klein. 



(Continued from page 7) 
boxes of chalk were used and two 
sides of the gymnasium were cov- 
ered with the record of the score. 

Forthwith the faculty dispers- j 
ed, choosing neither their direc- 1 
tion nor places of exit. Thus j 
were the jubilant co-eds left to j 
celebrate their first victory over | 
the faculty. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



♦ 


E. HARLAND 




Proprietor 




PALACE BILLIARD HALL 


\ DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 




CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 




COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 




JACKSON, MISS. 



The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 
GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 ROOMS 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDNN & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 




10 



€be purple ano mbitz 




BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



The pleasing news comes to us j 
that W. D. Foster, our last year’s 
coach turned out a football team 
at Porter Military School that ! 
j won the prep school champion- 
; ship of the South Atlantic States. 
Congratulations, Coach ! 



NOW IS THE TIME 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



Wednesday morning Mr. W. A. 
Brown lead chapel and gave a 
very interesting talk. He said 
i the work of a teacher was to plant 
growing ideas so that these 
j ideas would become living ideals 
j in the minds of the piipils. Mr. 
Brown told in a very impressive 
j manner of the life of Charles Par- 
ker and his work among the Mo- 
hammedans in India. 



IF YOU LIKE 
MOVING PICTURES 
VISIT 

THE MAJESTIC 

The place that you are never 
disappointed. Nothing but strict- 
ly High Class, Moral and Educa- 
tional Pictures shown. We show 
' nothing but licensed films passed 
by the National Board of Cenor- 
ship. 

Open Daily at 2 P. M. 
Closed at 11:30 
Change of Program Daily. 
Price, 5c and 10c. 

THE MAJESTIC 

The Most Popular Photo-Play 
. House. 

H. D. BOWERS, Prop, and Mgr. 



The following was found in a 
Freshman co-eds book. Reader, 
judge for yourself: 

Dear Santa Claus: 

I want you to bring me a great 
big doll what can shut its eyes 
and go to sleep. I would like for 
it to have yellow hair and blue 
eyes just like one of our prof’s. 

A. B. C. 

P. S. — Please bring me a T. A. 
too. 

ADVICE TO FRESHMEN. 



Miss Steen: What are you 

doing?” 

Miss Linfield: “Writing a pa- 
per on Glaciers.” 

Miss Steen: “Well, who is he 
and when did he live?” 



Dot your i’s and cross you t’s. 

Mind your q ’s and watch your p ’s. 

Always try your profs to please. 

Don’t forget to pay your fees. 

Keep off the grass, don’t climb 
the trees. 

Always greet a senior upon your 
knees. 

Always seem timid, never appear 
at ease. 

Be kind to all, the co-eds don’t 
tease. . 

Study hard, be busy bees. 

And of all the rules remember 
these. 

C. H. B., ’15. 

“Take no thought of the morrow.’* 

The pious girl at church today will 

not think about the hat she is to wear 

next Sunday. 




Yard Mill Street. 

Cumb. Phone 530. 

D. E. MARTIN 

Dealer in 

Coal, Wood and Kindling 

We Solicit Your Business. 
Orders Promptly Filled. 



THE 

“ WHOM ADE-THEM - FOR -YOU TT 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. t 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE ( “Regal” ShOeS 

the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp j 
Shoes, they lead j 
the world 1 
$6 and $6.50 j 



PRICE 



$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 

TRY THEM 



li| 




ah' ffitrph mb HUntr 

QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. V. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1913. No. 12. 



SIGMA UPSILON CONVEN- BASKET BALL. KAPPA SIGMA’S ABSORB 

TION. I PHI DELTA LOCAL. 

Millsaps Breaks Even With C. M. C. — Lose First and 

Millsaps Profs. Again Honored. Win Last. Event of Interest in College Fra- 

Drs. Kern and J. M. Burton Re- ternity Circles. 

elected President and Histo- Two Hotly Contested Games — Millsaps Boys Show 

rian, Respectively. ' Great Improvement. On Friday night, Dec. 11th, the 

Kappa Sigma Fraternity absorb- 

Dr. Kern was absent from The fans in and around Millsaps were treated to two real ed the Phi Delta Fraternity 
school several days after the Basket Ball games last week. Millsaps lost the first and won the which has been a local organiza- 

opening, attending the annual second. Both games were very exciting and it was shown that the tion at this college for the past 

convention of the Sigma Upsilon ! Millsaps squad is a great improvement over last year’s team. The ! four years. Both of these Fra- 

Literarv Fraternity. As is gen- C’. M. C. boys were much heavier than our bunch but they did not ternities have occupied promi- 

erally known, Dr. Kern has been seem to be as quick. j nent positions in college circles, 

president of the national organi- The first half of the first game ended with the score 7 to 1 in but on account of the large num- 

zation of this fraternity for favor of the C. M. C. boys. This did not discourage Millsaps in the her graduating from both of 

several years. The convention least and when the game was over the score was much closer — that them last year they were some- 

was royally entertained by Osiris j i s . 17 to 15 in favor of C. M. C.. and it is no doubt that if the game what weakened and it seemed ad- 

Chapter of Randolph-Macon Col - 1 had lasted three more minutes we would have won. visable to consolidate. This eom- 

lege and several social events ad- The second game was much more exciting than the first as is bination gives the Kappa Sigma 
ded pleasure to the meeting. shown by the score. Xot only was it more exciting but it was the largest membership of any 
The business sessions were ex- rougher. It was decided by all present, including the referee, that fraternity in college, 
ceedingly interesting and reports one of the C. M. G. boys was just a little too rough, so he was asked -A-t this initiation only the ae- 
(Continued on page 2) (Continued on page 8) (Continued on page 2) 




VARSITY BASE BALL TEAM 1912 






2 



Cf)e Purple anO CTtte 




COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian i 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President I 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer j 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary ' 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary- 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton : Secretary- 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary- 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President | 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett .Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager j 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager j 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager J 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton ....President 

' W. O. Brumfield Vice-President 

X. 3. Cain Secretary 

""irence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

>v Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom .'...Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary ; 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer: 

FRESHMAN. 

,T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President j 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. . 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell ...Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott -Anniversary Orator 

J. T . Weem s..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

\ 



C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Rav 
R. I. Jolly 

.Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. B F. L Magee n Business Mana S ers 
HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

Clerk 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



initiation to win and although 
| Millsaps was never in danger, 
during the first half, they had to 
play their best. The end of the 
I first half found the score 9 to 6 
I in favor of Millsaps. 

The second half was the most 
| exciting part of the game. The 
D’Lo boys did not seem at all 
I discouraged but played a stron- 
ger game. For a while enthusi- 
j asm was at its heights and the 
I constant cheering from the side 
lines did a great deal towards de- 
feating the D’Lo team. At times 
! it looked as if they had the game 
within their reach when Millsaps 
would get together as a unit and 
j add one or two points to their 
score. 

Bob Harmon, Kirkland and 
Henry featured for Millsaps 
j while Williams. May and Grant- 
ham played star ball for D’Lo. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Millsaps. D’Lo. 

| Henry Center May 

j Kirkland F Williams 

j Bob Harmon F Grantham 

Gaddis. Cook, Jones ...G ...Alexander 
Hobert, N. Harmon G Ross 

Referee — Fletcher. 

Umpire — Colmer. 

See Hobbs for good barbering. 

I Shack 4. 



(Continued from page 1) 

from the various chapters show- 
ed that the fraternity is in excel- 
lent condition and doing much to 
promote the literary tone of the 
various colleges. A charter was 
granted to the English Club at 
the University of Texas. A new 
constitution was adopted and 
rules for a short story contest 
were passed. 

The following officers were 
i elected for the coming year: 

A. A. Kern, Millsaps, President. 

J. M. Burton, Millsaps, His- 
torian. 

W. J. Fallin, Vanderbilt, Secre- 
tary. 

J. R. Span. Randolph-Macon, 

{ Treasurer. 

(Continued from page 1) 

tive members of the Phi Delta 
Fraternity were taken in, but it 
is supposed that sometime in the 
future its alumni will be initiated 
as this is customary when a na- 
tional fraternity absorbs a local 
organization. 

Those who went through were: 
Prof. G. L. Harrell, Messrs. J. D. 
Wroten. Olin Rav, W. E. Morse. 
X. L. Cassibry. J. R. Gathings. V. 
B. Hathorne. R. T. Henry, V. G. 
Clifford and W. B. Montgomery. 



MILLSAPS, 15; D’LO, 12. 



(Intended for last week.) 

At exactly seven-thirty o’clock 
last Friday night Referee Fletch- 
er blew the whistle which started 
one of the most exciting basket 
ball games that has ever been 
played at Millsaps. 

The two teams were on the 
court at seven o’clock sharp, and 
as they were warming up for the 
near approaching contest, their 
countenances betrayed the look 
of one who is confident of victory. 

During the first few minutes of 
play the D ’Lo boys seemed to suf- 
fer from stage fright, which was 
due from the cheering of the 
throngs which packed the grand 
stand, but later they proved 
equal to- the occasion and played, 
great ball. 

Bob Harmon started the ball 
to rolling and it was kept goifig 
by Henry and Kirkland. Both 
teams played with a strong det/er- 



Right exercise makes you 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work, 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
, Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Big F 


resh Stock of 




HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 

Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 

■— 




€be Purple anO TOite 



3 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 



The recent death of Carlos Dru Williams brings 
sadness to the entire student body. As this sadness is 
most deeply felt among his schoolmates, be it 

Resolved, by the students of Millsaps Preparatory 
School, 

1. That we express our sympathy to the bereaved 
family in the loss of their loved one. 

2. That we shall ever cherish the memory of his 
true, noble life, as lived among us, and the faithful work 
that he did in athletics, literary society and in school 
work in general. 

3. That we know that we have lost one of the 
strongest members of our school. 

4. That it is our heartfelt wish that God may con- 
sole those who are bereaved. 

5. That a copy of these resolutions be printed in 
the Purple and White and that a copy be sent to his 
relatives. 

Permit us to say further that, notwithstanding the 
fact that .we are grieved over his loss, yet we submit to 
the will of God, and trust that those even nearer to him 
may have the same spirit. 

(Signed) R. J. SPINKS. 

J. A. WOOTEN. 

N. GOLDING, 

Committee representing the Student Body. 




FRONT OFFICE 

Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing every modern 
filing device. Connected by interior telephones with departments. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214 / 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALLS REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


GREEN TREE HOTEL 

RATES: $1.50 A DAY. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
T. O. BYRD, Prop. 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210/2 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 




The Jones Printing Company 

' DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON. MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relfef of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 




BON-TON CAFE 

REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



t 





4 



€be purple anD White 



UZbt purple anD White 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



This is particularly gratifying 
to us, for there is nothing that 
Millsaps College needs more, nor 
anything that would be of more 
good to her than a good case of 
this same college spirit — the bub- 
bling, overflowing kind that 
makes itself evident on every oc- 
casion where there is need for it, 
yet holds the enthusiastic college 
supporter within the bounds of 
decency and self respect. 

Probably this increase of 
spirit is due to the fact that the 
team is beginning to ‘‘support 
the college” as well as demand- 
ing that the college support the 
team. If this is true, then it is 
incumbent upon the students to 



around the hotels, the pool rooms, 
or the drug stores, do you sup- 
pose they will send their own 
boys here or advise anybody else 
to send theirs? 

From the standpoint of the boy 
himself, nothing gets him “in 
bad” with the faculty, and his 
associates more quickly, nothing 
generates idleness more surely, 
and nothing draws the money 
from the pocket more regularly 
than the habit of loafing around 
town at night. It has always 
been inconceivable to us how a 
boy, especially one surrounded 
bv the influences that one is at 



vant received his reward, if it 
may be so called, by being asked 
to pay the debt which he owed 
his lord. Again was the story 
told of the master of the vineyard 
who hired the servants to labor 
in his vineyard. The story of the 
young man who came to Jesus 
and asked him what he should 
do to inherit eternal life. When 
he counted the cost of righteous 
living and found that it meaut 
the loss of his property he went 
away sorrowful. 

The principal thought of the 
discourse was taken from this 
verse: “So then, as w T e have op- 



Millsaps, can so far forget him- por tunity, let us do good to all 



self and what he was sent here 



show their spirit by going out , for as to allow himself to get in 



and helping make the teams bet- 
iter able to. “support the college.” 
Then we may build up not only 
teams that are capable of win- 
ning games but also a genuine 
j whole-souled college spirit that 

will at all times be one of 

The honor council is too well the pre-eminent sources of the 
known to the students of Mill- strength that enables the team to 



the habit of going to town and 
idling around down there to the 
neglect of the work for which he 
was sent here. 



THE HONOR SYSTEM. 



Y. M. C. A. 



saps 



emerge victorious from its vari- 



ON GOING DOWN TOWN 



and too much imbued in 
their hearts for us to enter into ous conflicts, 
any detailed discussion of it here. 

It is the pride and joy of the 

students that they are permitted I 

to attend college where the hon- We wish to express our hearty 
or council works in such a sue- approval of the recent determin- 
eessful manner. It should be the j ation of the faculty to enforce 
ideal of every student that Mill- j with greater strictness the regu- 
saps College becomes a place j lations on going to town at night 
where the honor system is held in ; and also the application of these 
such reverence and esteem that | regulations to the Juniors, 
there would not even be a sus- 1 habit that some of our boys have 
picion that any student of the of visiting town too frequently 



Prof. 



On 



G. L. Harrel Speaks to the 
Association. 



college fails to hold sacred the 
spirit and letter of the system. 

We say this not because we 

fear that the majority of our 

students are not staunch support- 
ers of the honor system but be- 
cause we deem it fitting just at 



is. without doubt, the greatest 
evil against which the authorities 
of the college have to contend. 
The practice is against the best 
interests of all concerned, the 
college as well as the student. 

Looking at it from the view- 



this time to express the hope that point of the college, we can think 



Friday night. Jan. 10, the [ 
first meeting after Christmas, the I 
Association was pleased and hon- 
ored with having Prof. Harrel as | 
a speaker. As a student he was j 
an active member of the Y. M. C. 
A. for five years and at one time 
president. We rejoice to say that 
he has not lost interest in the 
work of the Association with the 
The [ passing of the years but, with 
the other members of the faculty, 
still* takes a deep interest in the 
promotion of its welfare. 

The speaker chose as his sub- 
ject, “Counting the Cost,” — one 
that should be of especial inter- 
est to a student just starting out 
in the battle of life 
it was about this time of 
when the business men of 



men.” This is a lesson of friend- 
ship. Nor is it necessary to hav:* 
a great number of men as friends 
in order to accomplish something. 
The promise has been given that 
where two or three are gathered 
together they will be blessed. 

It was a strong presentation of 
a good subject. The Association 
was pleased to have him and 
hopes to have him again soon. 

PREP LOCAIS. 



We regret to say that Mr. L. 
H. Gates will not be with us for 
the rest of the year, but hope that 
he will be back with us next year. 



We are glad to have wjtu us 
for the rest of the year Quinn and 
Fondren. Quinn was with us 
last year and starred on the base 
ball team. Fondren made good 
as pitcher with C. H. A. last year, 
and we are expecting great work 
from him in the athletic line. 



We are delighted to hear that 
He said that Prof. Noble had such good luck 
year while hunting in Louisiana dur- 
the ing the holidays. In his account 



the honor council will not be sub- 1 of nothing that has a greater ten- 1 financial world were taking stock ■ of the trip he states that he found 



jected to the painful duty of call- 
ing anyone to task for doing that 
which he ought not during the 
present period of examinations. 

COLLEGE SPIRIT. 



deney toward acquiring for it a and counting the cost of their thousands of birds ; had two good 
bad reputation, not only in the business. The college student dogs : shot 120 times ;but didn t 
City of Jackson, but throughout j must count the cost of life, must J kill anything. 



the State. Jackson being the 
Capital City of the State, there 
are always visitors here from dif- 
ferent parts of the State. These 
visitors are always prominent 
and influential citizens of the 
community in which they live — 
who send their 



Unless we were laboring under 
an hallucination, a vision, a 
dream or something similar, we j 
noticed that there was more gen- 1 just the men 
uine college spirit and enthusi- boys to college or the ones with 
asm displayed last week at the j whom other people advise with 
basket ball games than has ever when they are looking for a good the small sum of seventeen dol- 
been witnessed before at Mill- place to send their boys. If, lars and caused him to be cast 
saps during the same period of when these men are in Jaekson, i into prison. Apart from the 
time. they see the college boys loafing j moral wrong of his deed, the ser- 



count the cost of their actions in 
school life. 

Several passages were read 
from the Bible bearing on this 
point. The first of these was 
about the king whose servant 
owed him ten thousand talents 
and whom the king forgave the 
debt. Then this servant went to 
a fellow servant who owed him 



The famous laws of the 
Medes and Persians have been 
broken by the faculty of Millsaps 
College. The latest edict is as 
follows: “The Seniors may go 

to town with permission ; the 
Juniors must petition the faculty 
for permission ; Sophomores can 
not go at all; iron collars and 
chains with the names engraved 
thereon will arrive in a few days 
for the Freshmen. The Preps are 
to be confined in dungeons.” 




€bt purple anD Uibixt 



5 






TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 






Firearms in the hands of boys 
usually get some fingers. 

Marriage is no uneven game— it is 
a tie. 



There are 74,000 foreign seamen on BOYS! Come and See the New 
British ships. FaH gtyles j n aU leathers an( j 

„ ... toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 

Passengers are apt to see stars ^ 

when a train telescopes. i n tan, gun metal and patent, 

button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



FROM THE PENMANSHIP DEPARTMENT 

OF 

HARRIS BUSINESS UNIVERSITY, 
JACKSON, MISS. 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



6 



LOCALS. 



We regret to note that Harri- 
son has been ill lately. 

Leroy Ratliff has left school to 
take up a business course at 
Soule. 



How strange ! No one accused 
any of the Profs, of getting mar- 
ried this Xmas. 



R. J: Mullins, of the class of 
’09, was a pleasant visitor on the 
campus last week. 

Patronize our advertisers for 
it is by them that we are able to 
run the paper. 



Charlie Chrisler spent the holi- 
days at Grenada. Miss., guest of 
the McLain boys. 



Week before last was Christ- 
mas week ; week after next will 
be a question. 

When speaking of studying 
one might appropriately exclaim. 
“Now am de time.” 



Let us wish you a happy New 
Year. May your troubles be few 
ar.d your r„sses many. 



How do you like the new “An- 
swer Books” the faculty has 
thrust upon the students? 



Messrs. George and Kinney, of 
Mississippi College, spent Sunday 
with friends on the campus. 



Professors Cliette and Randal, 
of Wier, Miss., visited Mr. P. H. 
McGee and family last week. 



R. E. Selby was called home to 
the bedside of his father, who is 
quite sick, a few days ago. 



Lester Lewis, who finished last 
year, is now boarding on the cam- 
pus and attending a business col- 
lege in this city. 



T. B. Doxey is still tailoring. 
Get him to make your suit and 
get the special discount he gives 
the college boys. 



Rev. R. C. Edwards filled Bro. 
P. H. McGee’s appointment at 
Bevil’s Hill last Sunday, and de- 
livered two excellent sermons to 
large and appreciative audiences. 



Cl purple anO Z&bite 



R. E. Steen, last year’s editor 
of the Purple and White, is edit- 
ing a paper at New Albany. Miss. 
Here’s wishing him much success. 



Dr. Kern had quite a pleasant 
trip during the holidays. After 
taking in the Sigma Upsilon con- 
vention. he visited Ashland and 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Jim Wilbourn. a member of 
last year’s Freshman class, pass- 1 
ed through the city last Monday 
en route to Sewanee, where he is 
attending school this year. ' 

The friends and frat mates of 
Victor Clifford gladly welcome 
him hack to Millsaps and hope 
for him a prosperous year, j 
“Viet” spent the first three, 
months of the present school year I 
at the University of Missouri. 

C. E. Johnson, former editor 
of the Purple and White and ex- 
president of the Ancient Order of 
Hyenas, visited friends on the 
campus last Saturday and Sun- 
day. The “Big Boy” says he is 
practicing economy these days as 
well as law. 



J. B. Cain: “I tried awful 

hard to get married Christmas. 

Brown: “Maybe you didn’t 

try in the right way.” 

J. B. Cain: “I don’t know 

about that, but mine was the 
good old fashioned way.” 



We are glad to have Houston 
Evans, who was a member of the 
graduating class of the Prepara- 
tory School last year, with us. 
Evans says he means business 
and will show the “Profs” a few 
tricks after examinations are 
over. 



James McClure’s father,, a 
prominent merchant of Fayette, 
and a member of the board of 
trustees of the State colleges, 
was a uleasant visitor on the cam- 
pus one day last week while he 
was in the Capital City attending 
a meeting of the board of trus- 
tees. Isn’t it funny how sancti- 
monious some boys get when 
their father is around? 



In the days that tried men’s souls, 
patriots were faithful and true. To- 
day they are hopeful and hungry. 



Sometimes it is not the cream 
which should be whipped, but the 
milkman. 




OCIETV 
PINS & 

EMBLEMS 



WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 

Visit A. J. ORKIN’S 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



Jewelry Store 
for fine 

Christmas Presents. 
We are Leaders in Low 
Prices. 

206 West Capitol Street. 



WE MAKE HIGH GRADE ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS 
AND KINDS. 

Our collections of individuals include fruits, flowers, figures 
and designs suitable for any occasion. 

Brick and Neapolitan we make in any combination of flavors 
and colors desired. 

Write us what you want and when you want it to arrive and 
we will do the rest. 

CARLOSS ICE COMPANY 

(INCORPORATED) 

Manufacturers of ICE AND ICE CREAM. 
•JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.S32.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkfms, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnso\i, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gnnter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 





C&ejt> urpIcanD Z&bitc 



WHY You Should Smoke 

MILD Tobacco CMk 



A MILD tobacco is soothing, restful, health- 
ful. Strong tobacco irritates and may 
cause nervousness. 

Tuxedo is the ideal tobacco. It is the mildest 
tobacco — yet rich and has a delicious flavor ; nd 
aroma. 

You can smoke Tuxedo all day long — pipeful 
after pipeful — without making yourself nervous. 
Tuxedo can’t bite y. • tongue or irritate the deli- 
cate membranes of your mouth and throat— 
because in Tuxedo every unpleasant feature has 
been removed by the famous “Tuxedo process” of 
treating the tobacco leaf. 



GEO. P. JAMES 

Geo. P. James, District Passenger 
Agree t of the Atlantic Coast Lines, at 
Washington, D. C.. says: 

‘ 'Pm a great admirer of Tuxedo. 
It's cool, pleasant to the taste, and 
has the happy faculty of keeping my 
brain ‘clear for action' ." 



L. LEFAUX 

L. Lefaox, Assistant Engineer of tha 
New Orleans Fire Department, says: 

“Firemen, above all others, are 
under an almost continuous stress 
and strain. I know of >.o better 
relief and relaxation for them than 
Tuxedo. / use it myself —con- 
stantly." 



The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 

Every new, good thing is imitated. Tuxedo 
was born in 1904, and is the original in its field. 

Since 1904 many imitations of Tuxedo have 
been created. Not one of them has come within 
gunshot of the secret process which makes Tuxedo 
the pleasantest, healthfulest smoke in the world. 

Compare the imitators with Tuxedo: look at 
them, and note the lighter, milder color of Tuxedo; 
smell them and note the marked superiority of the 
odor of Tuxedo; smoke Tuxedo in comparison with 
them and you will feel a difference in taste so 
sharp that you will never again smoke anything but 
Tuxedo. 

Test Tuxedo by smoking it*for a week. At the 
end of the week your nerves will be steadier, your 
health w r ilL be better — and you will have had the 
most enjoyable smoke week of your life. 



MARC WRIGHT 

Marc Wright, who tied for second 
place in the pole vault at the Olympic 
Games, and holds the world's record for 
that event, says: 

1 ‘ Tuxedo is the tobacco that 1 
smoke — Tuxedo and no other. I 
prefer it to all other tobaccos be- 
cause it is mild and slow-burnii: 
and doesn't hurt the throat or t ■ 
the longue. Tuxedo gets my w 



MAURICE FARKOA 
Maurice Farkoa, whose fine tenor voice 
is heard to such advantage in the Shubert 
production. "The Merry Countess” says: 

“Many fellow singers have com- 
plained to me that tobacco smoking 
hurts their voices. My answer in- 
variably is that they don't smoke 
Tuxedo. I DO, and I never have 
any voice trouble. Tuxedo is the 
ideal smoke." 



YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 

Famous green tin, with gold 1 A Convenient pouch, inne 
lettering, curvedtofitpocket ll/C lined with moisture-proof pa 



Illustrations 
are about one- 
half size of 
real packages. 



ROY NORTON 

Roy Norton, well-known writer, author 
of "The Plunderer", etc., says: 

“As a veteran expert in tobacco, 
f have come to the conclusion that 
Tuxedo beats them all." 



JOHN T. TAYLOR 

John T. Taylor, Pittsburg Commi. 
sioner of the Amateur Athletic Union 
says : 

“ Tuxedo has my entire approval 
as a mild, bracing smoke. No 
harmful effects from tobacco, if 
vou choose Tuxedo." 



Self’s® 



8 



Qe ffutple anD aafritc 



FIRE IN FOUNDER’S HALL. We note that some of our Sen- 

iors are growing a mustache. 

Preps Alarmed by Blaze in Dor- With the proper nourishment and 
mitory — Heroic Work Saves nursing we have all reasons to be- 
Building. lieve that they will grow a flour- j 

ishing set. Here’s hoping that J 

The Preps had quite an excite- they may grow long and curly { 
ment early Monday morning ! and will make of certain Seniors 
when the alarm was given that real handsome men. 

Founder’s Hall was on fire. It is 

not definitely known whether The Profs, have reversed the | 
that being the thirteenth day of order of things this week and in- 

the month had anything to do stead of doping out lectures 

with it or not, yet the fact re- 1 teeming with knowledge they are j 

mains that the fire was danger- j gathering in. Shall we say that 

ously nearing the point where it 1 the answers which the students j 
would have done considerable are turning in are “teeming with 
damage when Xeal. who happen- 1 knowledge?” 

ed to be rooming under the place 

of conflagration, discovered it The managers of the Annual | 
and gave the alarm. Those preps are not even letting up on their 
who were not too busy bumping work during the exams. Makes 
their trunks down the stairs or us kinder wish we hadn’t signed 
chunking them recklessly out of that five dollar note now. Its — 
the window, regardless of where to be a senior. 

went “her picture” and other; 

things they had been religiously Have you had your picture 
holding in hiding since their en- made for the Annual yet ? Better 
trance to college, managed to watch out. you will find that they 
form a bucket brigade and entin- 1 can get out an Annual without 
guish the flames. it. Then how would you feel ? 

Two fire companies appeared 

on the scene but were too late to I The literary societies failed to 
share in the work. meet Friday night on account of 

I the nearness to exams. 

Ward. “I am getting awful 

good.” Junior: “I wish I had a mil- 

Harmon: “Why don’t you lion dollars.” 

make a preacher?” Freshman: “I wish my exams 

Ward: “I got too much life were over, that would be much 

about me.” nicer.” 



(Continued from page 1) 

to retire." The score stood 11 to 11, and everybody thought it would 
end just that way, but Frazier proved equal to the occasion and 
threw a foul goal, the whistle blowing the instant after. The final 
score was 12 to 11 in favor of Millsaps. 

The line-up for the two teams was as follows: 



Millsaps. C. M. C. 



Kirkland .... 




Center 


Gilbert 


Gaddis 





Guard 


Black 


Cook 





Guard 


Watkins 


Bell 




Forward 


Moss 


Frazier 




Forward 


Hosev 


Harmon 




Forward 


Buckley 



Subs for C. M. C.— Morris. Parkness; for Millsaps — Henry, 
Jones, Harmon. Referee — Buckley. LTmpire — Fletcher. 

. Monogram Sweaters Presented to Gaddis, Cook, Harmon, 
Frazier, Kirkland and Hobert. 

Sweaters bearing the basket ball monogram were presented 
during the last week to the following men : Gaddis. Cook, Harmon, 
Frazier, Kirkland and Hobert. These men are doing excellent work on 
the team and rightly deserve this bestowal of honor on them. We con- 
gratulate’ them. Other men who are doing good work on the squad 
are Henry and Henry, Harmon, Jones and Bell. 

The Basket Ball Team defeated D'Lo, Bill Colmer's team, week 
before last to the tune of 15 to 12. The visitors put up a plucky 
fight and deserve credit for being a clean, snappv bunch of fellows. 

A 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D„ President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



€tje ffurple anD COhite 



9 



I 



Rensselaer 

Polytechnic 

and Science Institute 

Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.\ Mechanical En- 
gineering (M. E.), Electrical Engineering (E. E.j, and 
General Science i E. S. . Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of gradua'es and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



LAW NOTES. 



We regret to announce the con- 
tinued illness of Judge W. R. 
Harper, but are glad to note that 
he is much improved and hopes 
to be out again by the latter part 
of this •week. During his absence 
the Hon. Robert B. Ricketts, of 
the law firm of Longino and Rick- 
etts, has lectured the law class. 



IF YOU LIKE 
MOVING PICTURES 
VISIT 

THE MAJESTIC 

The place that you are never 
disappointed. Nothing but strict- 
ly High Class, Moral and Educa- 
tional Pictures shown. We show 
nothing but licensed films passed 
by the National Board of Cenor- 
ship. 

Open Daily at 2 P. M. 
Closed at 11:30 

Change of Program Daily. 
Price, 5c and 10c. 

THE MAJESTIC 

The Most Popular Photo-Play 
House. 

H. D. BOWERS, Prop, and Mgr. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

"Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath, 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath. One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath, Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



There have been several addi- 
tions to the class since the holi- 
days. We are glad to welcome 
Messrs. Featherstone and Me- 
Laurin, of Jackson; and Regous- 
sa. of Biloxi. It is reported that 
Mr. R. E. Steen, a member of the 
class of 1910. will also join the 
class within the next few days. 



Mr. J. Andrew Blount was ab- 
sent from classes during the first 
days of the week in attendance 
| upon the annual meeting of the 
Grenada System of Banks. No 
doubt our good friend acquitted 
himself with credit both at the 
festive board and in the business 
! sessions. 



Bryan Dabney has been con- 
fined to his room hv an attack of 
the grippe but will soon be out 
| again much to the delight of his 
friends and classmates. 

— 

Mr. Regoussa was a member of 
j the party that ended so sadly in 
J the tragedy on the Farish trestle 
| on last Sunday evening. We are 
j glad to note that he escaped un- 
injured. 



In pursuance of an arrange- 
ment made some months ago, 
Judge Reed will deliver a lecture 
to the law class at the Supreme 
I Court chamber on Thursday 
evening. January the twenty- 
third. All who are interested in 
the subject are cordially invited 
to be present. His subject is: 
Hints to the Young Lawyer. 



The Moot Court will resume its 
session at the county court house j 
next Monday night. Just what 
cause will be tried is not known. ) 
but there will be some sort of 
justice dispensed. 



Manager Kirkland has arrang- 1 
ed two games each with Missis- 1 
sippi A. & M. and Mississippi Col- f 
lege, to be played after examina- 1 
tions. Come out fellows, and lets 
get their “goats.” 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



R. E. HARLAND 

Proprietor 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 
DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 

JACKSON, MISS. 



The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAS'l 
GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 RO( 

WEEKLY DANCES 

W. N. DRIVER, Managerl 



J. D. GORDON, President. 

Cumberland Phone 66. 



L. M. GORDON, Mar.agd 
Home Phone 366. 



J. D. GORDNN & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 



10 



€be [purple anp CTite 




PRENTISS LITERARY SO- 
CIETY. 



BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



II NOW IS IKE TIME 

cTbuy your Fall Suit, 
et us have your meas- 
re. We sell 

Ki 

Co 

.r W< 



KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 



College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 



JT he Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 




The Prentiss boys held their 
first meeting since the holidays 
last Friday night. There was a 
good attendance and an enthusi- 
astic response to the calls of those 
on the program. Pres. Bufkin 
presided, and Alford, the chap- 
lain, lead in prayer. 

Alford also read a delightful 
essay. Two men, Wooten and 
Golden responded to the call for 
declaimers and demonstrated 
that they have the essentials of 
finished orators. 

The subject for debate was, 
“Resolved. That Mississippi 
should have an educational quali- 
fication for suffrage.” Clegg and 
Davis ably upheld the affirmative 
while Bufkin. Barrett and Joyce 
put up unanswerable arguments 
for the negative. The decision 
was rendered in favor of the neg- 1 
ative. 

N. Johnson was elected treasu- 
rer for the next term. 

Judge Blount of the law class, 
left Sunday to attend the annual 
gathering of the Grenada Bank- 
ing System at Grenada. The j 
Grenada Banking System is one 
of the largest in the South, and j 
its stockholders and directors i 
meet annually and participate in 
social features as well as business 
sessions. Blount is not as yet one 
of the kings of finance but Mill- 1 
I saps is glad to have one of her 
I students the guest of a meeting 
I like this. 



A. B. Campbell, formerly 
known to Millsaps students as 
“Boyd,” now as “Prof. Camp- 
bell of Eupora,” passed through 
Jackson last Sunday. Campbell 
is superintendent of a school with 
an enrollment of nearly four hun- 
dred pupils and ten assistants. 
He is making good in every re- 
spect and will ere long be at the 
very top of his profession. 



Yard Mill Street. 

Cumb. Phone 530. 

D. E. MARTIN 

Dealer in 

Coal, Wood and Kindling 

We Solicit Your Business. 
Orders Promptly Filled. 



THE 

“ WHO-MADE-THEM- FOR- YOU " 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5,00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead \ 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 

TRY THEM 





QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 




Vol. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1913. 



No. 13-14 




FOUNDERS’ HALL BURNS. 

Oldest Building of the College 
Consumed by Flames — Work 
of Rebuilding to Begin Shortly. 
Work of School Not Affected. 




Millsaps Breaks Even With A. & M. — Lose First and 



One of the most eventful hap- 
penings of the present session 
was the burning on the night of 
the fifteenth of the building 



Win Second. 

Millsaps Boys Show Great Improvement in Team Work. 
The Whole Team Stars — Mississippi College Next. 



known as Founders’ Hall, for | 

many years used as the college Millsaps broke even with A. & M. in the two games which were 
dormitory, but for the past year P la - vecl at Starkville last Friday and Saturday nights, having lost 
and a half as the Millsaps Pre- ^ rs f an d and won the last game. Both games were clean, snappy 
Paratorv School Not onlv be- an< ^ ^ ast- The ^°. vs were a great deal heavier than the Mill- 

cause of the handicap which it sa P s * 10 ' s ' f^ e latter had it over them in team work. In fact, the 
places upon the authorities but team w °rk displayed by the Jackson boys was something remarkable 
because of the sentimental place an< ^ Coach Fletcher deserves all kinds of credit for beating it in to 
which it held in the hearts of the . them. 



students, past and present, who | Fletcher ’s bunch would probably have defeated A. & M. in the 
have lived in it, is it a source of , first game if they had been in condition. The game was begun imme- 



much regret to all connected with j diately after the train arrived at Starkville. The Millsaps boys, be- 
the college, that this, the oldest J sides being tired out, got no supper, and naturally this tended to 
building on the campus, has been make them somewhat weak. Consequently, by the time the first half 



laid bare of its usefulness by the was over they were played down. As evidence, however, that they 
(Continued on page 2) _ (Continued on page 3) 



CLARK ESSAY CONTEST. 

The subject for the Clark Essay 
Contest for the present session 
has been announced as “The Cre- 
oles of George W. Cable.’’ The 
essay will be due on the first Sat- 
urday in May, at which time an 
impromptu subject will be as- 
signed on which an essay must be 
written. There is no limit as to 
the length of the essays and the 
contest is open to the entire col- 
lege. Dr. Kern will be glad to 
confer with all who are thinking 
of entering the contest and to 
give them as much help as is al- 
lowed under the terms of the con- 
test. The medal was won last 
year by Mr. J. B. Cain of the 
present senior class. 

Rev. Paul D. Hardin. Pre- 
siding Elder of the Jackson Dis- 
trict, made the student body a 
short but very interesting talk at 
chapel one morning last week. 






2 



Cbc purple anD zabite 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon . Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary 

Phi Delta. 

J. R. Gathings Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. NobLe Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burion Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

W. B. Montgomery President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer j 

Bob Sterling Secretary 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton President | 

W. O. Brumfield Vice-President 

J. B. Cain Secretary j 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer j 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates ....Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage - President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter :......Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock : - Secretary i 

G. W. Harrison — Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway i— Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President J 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey J- President 

J. A. Blount .....Vice President j 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson > Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J.T.Weems..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 



C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 

Olin Rav 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

.S B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer j 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President j 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer j 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager I 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager J 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 1 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary ] 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief j 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager I 

Bobashela. 

F . T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. I R I Mageo' 1 Business Managers 

HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman ! 

Clerk 



“Dunlap” Hats jackson-s greatest store “R e g a |” Shoes 



(Continued from page 1) 

all consuming hand of fire, and 
that no more will its ancient halls 
resound with call of the ‘‘Hyena” 
or the boisterous shout of Prep. 

Its lines were not those of a 
Pantheon nor did its materials 
vie with Parean marble in beauty, 
but who can not see beauty in his 
mother, his Alma Mater? And 
what does one remember more 
lovingly than those walls, which 
for many short and happy days, 
have been his home — his whilom 
roof tree? 

But they say that every cloud 
has a silver lining. Let it prove 
true in this case. Like the Phoe- 
nix. may we see arise from the 
flame, a grander, nobler being 
than the first, a dormitory wor 
thy of Millsaps, because of the 
glory of her past, the honor of 
her present and the prospects of 
her future. 

Despite the burning of its 
home, the work of the Prepara- 
tory Department has not been af- 
fected. With the loss of only a 
single day the students have ac- 
customed themselves to the 
changed conditions and are go- 
ing ahead with their work. Com- 
fortable quarters have been pro- 
vided for most of them in the 
shae^ with Mrs. Jo3’ce, the ma- 
tron, to supervise, while others 



$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



the College [Boys' 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



Standard of Perfection. 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 

TRY THEM 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Big Fresh Stock of 



HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



are located at boarding houses j in the Y. M. C. A room. Thus 
near bv_ Recitations are heard the boys will be held together un- 
in the’ administration building. , tn the dormitory can be rebuilt, 
and study hall is held every night Advertise in purple and white. 




Cfte purple attO Z&bitc 



3 



BASE BALL OUTLOOK. 



Practice Will Begin Next Week. 
Coach Peaster Will Have Task 
of Rounding Material Into a 
Winning Team. 



Manager Boswell has practical- 
ly completed the base ball sched- 
ule and will have it ready for 
publication at an early date. He 
is arranging a very attractive 
schedule with a number of good 
games at home and an excellent 
trip. 

If the weather permits, practice 
will begin next Wednesday, un- 
der direction of Coach Peaster, 
and from then on till June, the 
crack of ball and bat will prove 
an irresistable magnet that will 
draw the players and students 
toward Millsaps field every after- 
noon. 

Millsaps is to be congratulated 
on securing the services of Coach 



Peaster. He is a player of na 
tional prominence himself and 
not only knows baseball from 
to Z. but knows how to instill it 
into an amateur. Prof. Burton 
was very fortunate in secu 



sum that we were enabled to get 
Peaster. It behooves the mem- 
bers of the student body then to 
lend their financial support to- 
wards defraying the expenses 
incurred during the season. 

Nothing definite can be said 
yet concerning the players who 
will constitute the team. A num 
her of veterans are back and 
there is some promising new ma- 
terial that bids fair to make the 
old men hustle for a berth on the 
team. 

A complete schedule of games, 
both at home and abroad, will be 
published within the near future. 



(Continued from page 1) 

were playing the ball before they gave out, they were in the lead 
during the entire first half. In the second half, though, A. & M. 
piled them up so fast that, as a result, the game ended with a hand- 
some majority of points in their favor. 

But that last game! Boys, you ought to have seen it. Our boys 
played all over and all around the farmers, and they did it fast, too. 
Kirkland threw five goals in the first, half. Every man on the team 
starred. They made the oldest A. & M. veteran look like a youngster. 
If you had seen the game, you would never entertain a doubt but that 
Millsaps will mop up with Mississippi College when she meets her. 
The result was never in doubt. At the end of the first half the com- 
ments heard by the Purple and White reporter were to the effect that 
strength was no equal for brains and system, that there was no hope 
for the A. & M. boys against the team work of the Millsapers. 

If the A. & M. fellows are not trained in basket ball they are 
well versed in the art of entertaining. They surely did make the 
Jackson bunch have a good time. Prof. Burton — well, everything 
agreed not to tell tales out of school. 

The line up for the first game was as follows : 

Millsaps. A. & M. 

R. Harmon F Kenney 

Frazier. F Mingee 

Kirkland C Chadwich 

Gaddis G Goddv 

Cook G Gilleland 

Referee — Hayes. Umpire — Fletcher. 



DIRECTORY 


DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 
JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

21 4 J /2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

j 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210/2 West Capitol St. 

JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 

* 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 




The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 dorm State St. JACKSON, MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. V. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, JUiss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



Score — A. & M., 35 ; Millsaps, 17. 

SECOND GAME 

Millsaps. 



A. & M. 

(Noble, McArthur 

F (Gilleland 

(Branaman 

». F Mingee, Scott 

C - Chadwick. Lamb 

G — Goddv 

G McArther, Gilleland 

Referee — Hayes. Umpire — Fletcher. 

Score — Millsaps, 24; A. & M., 21. 

The next games will be with Mississippi College on the home 
grounds. 



R. Harmon 



Frazier ~ 
Kirkland 

Gaddis 

Cook 



MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 



BON -TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



4 



Cfte Purple anO CQbite 



Cbc Purple an 3 CGi)ite 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. \V. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2. 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3. 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 

ON TO JUNE. 



Let’s Redeem Ourselves. 

Exams, carrying joy and sor- 
row in their wake, have come and 
gone. The grades — that is, those 
above fifty, have been posted — 
and each man has given a shriek 
of delight to see opposite his 
name a pass or the possibility of 
a special, while perchance, others 
who have been denied the pleas- 
-vpre of “honorable mention” on 
the bulletin board, have slunk 
away in solitude to cuss their 
“luck.” 

Indeed these have been the 
“times that try men’s souls.” 
Boning and cramming has been 
the order of the day. Those who 
have been faithful during the ses- 
sion and have continued their 
vigilance during the exam period 
have made good grades. Some 
of thoie who have waited until 
exams to burn the midnight oil 
have managed to. spot the Profes- 
sor and cram enough to get by, 
while others who have been less 
diligent, have failed to get the 
aforesaid honorable mention and 
must listen to the seductive noise 
of the Professor as he tells them J 
to try again. 

Regardless of whether exams 
are irksome or delightful, the 
fact remains that they serve a ! 
good purpose. They are not so 
valuable as a test of knowledge j 
as they are a test of the students J 
ability to organize the mass of j 
knowledge which he has gone 
over into a coherent whole that 
he may use. Again they serve to 



show us exactly where we stand. 

Those dreams of boning up for 
exam and making up work that 
should have been carefully pre- 
pared earlier in the session may 
or may not have come true. That 
depends on the individual. No 
one will deny though, that if lie 
j had kept up with his work during 
! the session his grades would have 
been much better. 

Exams serve to separate the 
faithful from the unfaithful, the 
industrious from the lazy, the 
plodder from the loafer, and di- 
vide the college into those who 
are here with a determined pur- 
pose of accomplishing something 
and those who purposelessly and 
aimlessly squander their time and 
worship at the shrine of indolence 
and idleness. 

If a self-examination in the 
mellow light of the aftermath of 
the exam period points you out 
as one of the latter class, now is 
the time to resolve to regain your 
lost reputation as a student and 
resolve to redeem yourself in 
June. Make, keep and execute 
this one little resolution and we 
feel confident that at the end of 
'the session when your report goes 
j home adorned with ones and 
twos instead of fours, you not’ 
only will be a happy man your- 
self but your report will gladden 
the hearts of your father and 
mother who send you here, be- 
lieving that you are the brightest 
boy in the world. Think it over. 



: are asked to pay. So. when you 
are asked to pay it. don’t try to 
get out of paying. If you have 
it in your pocket, pull it out and 
pay it. If you haven’t, don’t 
wait to be dunned again, but hunt 
the business manager up when 
you get it. By following this 
method you will relieve the staff 
of an immense amount of un- 
necessary work and will enable 
it to give you a better Annual — 
give you more for your money. 

The staff expects to get out the 
Annual several weeks earlier this 
session than has been the cus- 
tom. Anything that you can do 
toward helping it in this deter- 
mination will be much apprecia- 
ted. 



WHAT ARE YOU DOING 
ABOUT IT? 



THE BOBASHELA. 



There is nothing that deserves j 
more hearty support from the 
student body'than the Bobashela. 
It is the only thing so far as the 
writer knows that purports to 
keep a permanent public record 
of the great occurences at Mill- 
saps. The Bobashela represents i 
the life of the students. 

It is the ambition of the staff 
this year, to get out the very best 
Annual that has ever been pro- 
duced at Millsaps. There is no 
reason why it should not do this. 
The only thing it needs is the sup- 
port of the fellows. It needs the | 
money. But the staff does not 
ask something for nothing. When 
a member of the business man- 
agement asks you for twenty-five j 
or fifty cents, he is not asking 
that you give it. You owe it for 
a picture that is going to be ; 
printed in the Annual, and it 
costs to print it just what you 



For several weeks past, due to 
exams and other interruptions, 
the Y. M. C. A. and literary so- 
cieties have failed to meet. Of 
course when it is impossible to 
hold a meeting of these important 
organizations it can not be helped 
but now that these interruptions 
are over there is nothing to pre- 
vent their work going on in the i 
usual regular order. Not a sin- 
gle man should get it into his I 
head that bcause he has done 
without these meetings for a few 
weeks, that he can cast them 
aside altogether. On the other 
hand, he should enter into the 
work with greater zeal and ener- j 
gy, determined to make up for j 
what time he has lost. 

Nothing that a man learns dur- ] 
ing his college career is of greater 
importance than what he learns 
at the Y. M. C. A. and the literary 
societies. They give a man a 
polish and tone that he can get 
no where else. They give him the 
power of forgetting himself and 
of speaking to a crowd or of 
meeting his fellow man face to 
face without timidity. We do 
not believe that we could say too 
much in their favor. Investigate 
the college career of the promi- 
nent men of today and we feel 
sure that you will find that nine 
tenths of them got the foundation 
of their training in the literary 
societies and Y. M. C’. A. while 
they were in college. So too. the j 
leading men in college are largely | 
judged by the active part they 
take in these organizations. Let 
us urge you then, if you have 
been neglecting these matters, do 
so no longer. 



| 

THAT DORMITORY PROPOSI- 
TION. 



Of all the plans which are be- 
ing formulated and discussed 
concerning the repairing of the 
prep dormitory and the erection 
of a college dormitory, the one 
that appeals to us as the most 
practical and feasible is that one 
whereby the prep school would 
be given a new building over on 
the hill near the observatory, the 
present dormitory turned into the 
Administration building of the 
college facing North State street 
and the present main building 
converted into a dormitory for 
the college students. 

This arrangement would be an 
ideal one for many reasons. In 
the first place it would furnish 
the preparatory school with a 
home of up-to-date equipment 
and design separated entirely 
: from the college. Next, it is but 
natural that the main building 
should face the principal street 
which passes near it. This would 
not only make it much more con- 
veniently located with reference 
to the car line but would give it 
a much better appearance to the 
general public as they pass by. 

In the next place, if the pres- 
ent administration building could 
be converted into an ideal dormi- 
tory. the location would be all 
that one could want. It com- 
mands not only one of the high- 
est and most beautiful points on 
the campus, but would be at prac- 
tically the exact center of the 
Other college buildings — that is, 
midway between the proposed 
main building and the other col- 
lege buildings. 

It seems to us that if there is 
ever to be any move made for se- 
curing a dormitory, now is the 
time. We believe that the fire has 
presented the opportunity to us 
and that if the above or a better 
plan is put into execution, it will 
mean a turning point towards a 
greater Millsaps. 

ROBB & CONANT 

Photographers 

Work of any description un- 
dertaken. and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 
exteriors. Any time, any place. 

423 1 East Capitol St. 

Jackson, Miss. 




€bc purple anD dibit c 



D 



MRS. WATKINS ENTERTAINS. 

Members of the Faculty and 

Friends Enjoy Hospitality of 

the President’s Home. 

On Thursday evening, Jan. 23, 
Mrs. A. F. Watkins delightfully 
entertained a few members of the 
faculty, with their young lady 
friends. 

Forty-two was played, after 
which each guest was bidden to 
write a poem to his partner. Many 
literary gems were produced, but 
these young people were artists 
as well as poets, for each one, af- 
ter writing an ode to his partner 
also drew a picture illustrating 
his literary production. 

Elaborate refreshments were 
served. A delicious salad course 
first, after which cream and cake 
was enjoyed. 

Those who enjoyed Mrs. Wat- 
kins’ delightful evening, were: 
Misses Ricketts, Butterfield, Park 
and Miss Eloise Watkins, Profs. 
Burton, Noble, Lin and Dr. Kern. 

DR. AND MRS. SWARTZ 

ENTERTAIN AT DINNER. 

One of Most Delightful Events 
of Social Season. 

— 

On Friday evening. Jan. 24. 
Dr. and Mrs. M. W. Swartz en- ( 
tertained at an elaborate dinner. 
Those who have attended any of 
Mrs. Swartz’s social functions j 
know the delightful manner in j 
which she entertains and the en- 1 
joyment of her guests is assured. 

Those present on Friday even- j 
ing, were : Dr. and Mrs. A. F. 

Watkins, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Patton, Prof. J. Reese Lin and 
Miss Janie Linfield. 

PREP SCHOOL PLAY. 

Prof. Noble Organizing Company 

to Give Shakesperian Play. 

Prof. Noble, ever active to the 
needs and advancement of the 
preparatory department, is now 
busily engaged working up what 
promises to be one of the most 
interesting events of the year. It 
consists in the presentation by 
the preparatory students of the 
well known play “As You Like 
It.” He claims to have found a 
natural stage in a beautiful grove 
on the east side of State Street, 
which will afford an ideal place 
for the presentation of the play 




itelga 



after the fashion of the Coburn 
players. 

He is making arrangements for 
securing a beautiful array of ap- 
propriate costumes and nothing 
will be left undone that will make 
for the success of the play. 

The receipts from the play will 
be turned over to the prep, ath- 
letic association. 

The scheme deserves the most 
hearty support of both preps and 
college boys. There is no reason 
why it should not be a great suc- 
cess. both from a financial and 
from a literary standpoint. The 
cause for which it is gotten up 
is a most commendable one, and 
no doubt there is plenty of talent 
in school to stage a play, the ex- 
cellence of whose work would de- 
serve recognition. 

In many schools, the college 
play is counted one of the most 
interesting events of the college 
year and does much to create en- 
thusiasm and college spirit. 



Yoiril find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 



BOBASHELA PROGRESSES 



Material Almost Ready for the 
Publishers. 



The students of the college will 
doubtless be glad to know that 
the Annual staff has practically 
completed its work. In fact 
Chief Scott says that all the 
literary dope is in hand and 
ready to be placed in the dum- 
mies and sent off for publication. 
Never before in the history of 
the publication has the work 
been carried on under better aus- 
pices. Every member of the 
staff has responded to his calls to 
duty and the results of his labors 
speak for themselves. The An- 
nual is expected to excel all for- 
mer editions and Scott and his 
staff are to be congraulated on 
the excellent manner in which 
they have handled the literary 
end of the publication. 

Weems and his corps of assis- 
tants have been busy rounding 
up the advertisers and the 1 " i ■ ■ 
and report good progress in b th. 



FRONT OFFICE 



Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss., showing every modern 
filing device. Connected by interior telephones with departments. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, 13. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 



Some member of the Sopho- 
more English class was about 
two hundred years behind time 
when he said that Sir Walter 
Raleigh wrote “The Life of Ad- 
miral Nelson.” O, well, you 
can’t expect them all to keep up 
with the times, especially on 
exams. 




6 



Che purple anD COhtte 



LOCALS. 



Ask Frazier about the college 
widow. 



Examinations are over. “We 
have met the enemy and we are 
theirs.” 



Frank Scott went up to Stark- 
ville last week with the basket ball 
team. 



Hurrah for the basket ball 
team. Let’s get Mississippi Col- 
lege’s goat next. 



Boys, what has become of that 
college orchestra that promised so 
well the first of the year ? Let 's 
have some more music ! 



Jack Jackson, (upon seeing a 
wind mill for the first time) : 
“Gee! those people have certain- 
ly got their electric fan up high.” 

Rev. C. J. Houndshell. travel- 
ing secretary of the Y. M. C. A., 
spent a few days of last week ) 
here in the interest of the Asso- 1 
ciation. 




PINS & 

EMBLEMS 



WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
11 LINE 



of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do ali kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Dr. Watkins spent Saturday 
and Sunday in Natchez where he 
preached Sunday. 



• Manager Slay of the U. of M. 
baseball team, was on the cam- 
pus last week. 



Say, old pal, how about that 
50 you made; could I induce you 
to dispose of it? 



Why did Spinks throw his bowl 
and pitcher out of the third story 
window and carry his pillow ten- 
derly in his arms, the night of the 
fire ? 



Marshal “Son” Quin, of the 
city has entered school and will 
be found with the boys on the 
campus for the rest of the ses- 
sion. 



look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken 
nington’s big store 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



We regret very much to lose 
Joe Spinks, one of our most 
promising preps. 

John Crisler, who is back at 
Vicksburg this year, made a visit 
to Jackson last week. 



R. W. Jones spent the week- 
end with home people at Touga- 
loo, Miss., U. S. A. 



C. Bullock spent Friday and 
Saturday with home people at 
Owl Bend, Miss. 



Miss Myrtle Johnson and Miss 
Edith McClure visited friends on 
the campus last week. 



Bishop Murrah and Nat John- 
son spent Friday night at Pickens, 
returning Saturday morning. 



Misses Wright. Jones and 
Peabody, were pleasant visitors 
on the campus last Friday and 
Saturday. 



Willingham, (in picture show) : 
“0, I have made a wmnderful dis- 
covery ; that fan is run by a gas- 
oline engine.” 



Prof. H. C. Robinson, former 
principal of the Daisy-Vestrv 
High School, and at present a 
student of Mississippi College, 
visited relatives on the campus 
Tuesday. 



Dr. Kern says his examination 
grades in Fresh. English, looks 
like a score board during a close 
game of ball with a heap of 
strike-outs. 



H- H. Boswell spent Saturday 
and Sunday with home folks at 
Kosciusko. He returned with 
the basket ball team Monday af- 
ternoon. 



Prof. E. Y. Burton chaperoned 
Kirkland, Cook and Scott over to 
Columbus Sunday, where they 
had the pleasure of reviewing the 
I. I. & C. girls. 



Jack Gaddis spent Sunday 
with Boswell at his home in Kos- 
ciusko. and was picked up by the 
rest of the fellows as they came 
back through that point fnm 
Starkville. 

C. W. Crisler has accepted a 
position with the Jackson Light 
and Traction Company. While 
we regret very much to loose 
“Cris,” we feel that he will make 
this firm an excellent man. 

Members of the basket ball 
team report that they saw Marvin 
Geiger while at Starkville. Geiger 
is a graduate of Millsaps. He is 
one of the State Chemists. He is 
making a state-wide reputation 
and his skill testifies to the effi- 
ciency of Dr. Sullivan’s depart- 
ment here. 



JackSOn, Miss. Advertise in PURPLE AND WHITE. 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS. President. AMQS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS. Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.S32.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A- A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 





Cfie purple anD Q3l)ite 



7 



s 



Tuxedo — the Most Enjoyable, Most 
Healthful Smoke, and the 
Most Economical 




JAMES T. POWERS 

James T. Powers, now successfully star- 
ring fotthe second season in "Two Little 
Brides/’ says: 

“ Tuxedo — first, last, all the 
time. The only pipe tobacco that 
satisfies me." 










SAM BERNARD 

Sam Bernard, well-known star in many 
musical comedy successes, says: 

"A tin of Tuxedo is my con- 
stant companion. J like it espe- 
cially because it has never given 
me a bit of throat trouble. The 
smoothest smoke ever. ’ ’ 







T HE most enjoyable smoke is a pipe. 

But many men refuse this method because 
they have had unhappy experiences with pipe 
tobaccos. 

Likely you have paid 35 cents to 50 cents 
for a tin of fancy “mixture”, and it burned 
your mouth or throat, or was unpleasantly 
strong. 

Too bad — but you got the wrong to- 
bacco. The hundreds of thousands of men 
who have tried 




The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 



have found the answer to their smoke prob- 
lems. Tuxedo is the mildest tobacco made. 
It cannot bite the tongue or dry the throat. 

And it’s economical. There are 40 pipefuls 
in a ten-cent tin. You can’t get any better tobacco 
because nothing better grows than the mellow, 
perfectly aged Burley leaf used in Tuxedo. 

If you try Tuxedo for a month and cut out 
other smokes, you will not only have had the best 
month of smoking you ever had in your life, but 
you will have made' a mighty big saving in your 
pocket-money ! 



YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 



Famousgreen tin, with gold 1 A 
lettering, curvedtofitpocket X UC 



Convenient ponch, inner- lined 
with moisture-proof paper 



FRANK MOULAN 

Frank Moulan. leading comedian in Franz 
Lehar’s new musical comedy.” The Count 
of Luxembourg," at til - New Amsterdam 
Theatre. New York City, sa> s : 

‘ ‘ Taxed i . mv vn ce a nd / agree 
perfectly. / h.ve n > quarrel with 
Tuxedo. It's a b su.i friend of 
mine, and my voice' s greatest bene- 
factor." 



Illustrations 
are about one- 
half size of 
real packages. 





RICHARD CARLE 

Richard Carle, who starred successfully 
in "The Girl from Montmartre.'’ "Mary's 

Lamb. The Spring Chic ken, "etc., says: 

‘ ‘ Tuxedo is my idea of U'hat a 
good, .. in it some smoke should be. 
I'm for it— always.” 







RALPH HERZ 

Ralph Herz, well known musical comedy 
star, says: 

“/ want Tuxedo in my pipe. 
Then I'm sure of satisfaction and 
not afraid of tongue bite. Mild 
and cool — there’s no other tobacco 
like it." 



5c 




CLIFTON CRAWFORD 

Clifton Crawford, leading nian in "The 
Quaker Girl," now starring in "My Best 
Girl," says: 

Tu. red > is my co-star. I at- 
tribute. a good deal of my success 
to it , l eea t *» it i uakes my ueri'es 
behave. !•• / < s f r voice culture! 
Try Tux J > ' 

/ 





8 



ti)e Purple anD QHfnte 



LAW NOTES. 



It is with great regret that we 
announce the continued illness of 
our esteemed instructor, Judge 
William R. Harper. During his 
illness the class is being conduct- 
ed by the Hon. R. B. Ricketts. 



Mr. James G. Long, of Tupelo, 
is the latest addition to our class. 
We welcome him among us. 



Who swiped Judge Whitfield’s 
“John B.?” Since the preceding 
s mtence was written it has been 
discovered that it was not a 
iheft, but it was only borrowed 
temporarily by Bro. Hardy to be j 
worn at the trial of some cases. 
We trust that it brought the said 
brother good luck and that the 
• T udge will soon be in possession 
of his lid. 



At the last meeting of the Moot 
Court a most interesting session 
was held. The case in action was , 
a contract between the Holi- j 
day Manufacturing Company and 
-John Lawson. The case was hard- 
fought throughout but was final- ] 
Iv decided in favor of plaintiff, 
the Manufacturing Co. The plain- 
' iff was represented by Messrs. 
Bailey and Logue, while the de- j 
fendant, Mr. Lawson, was repre- | 
■ ented by Messrs. Adam. Green 
and J. E. Johnson. 



One of the most notable events J 
>f the session of 1912-13, was the | 
lecture of Judge Richard F. 
Reed, of the Mississippi Supreme 
Court, to the Law class in the 
Supreme Court room on Thurs- 
day. January the twenty-fourth. 
Judge Reed took as his subject, 
“Early History of Mississippi 
Jurisprudence,” and for more 
than an hour delighted his hear- 
ers with the thrilling story of our 
great State’s early years. No 
man can speak with more authori- 
ty on this subject than Judge 
Reed. He has written a book on 
this period and the painstaking 
study given to the accumulation 
of data has made him complete 
master of the subject. 



We extend sincere congratula- 
tions to our young friends, 
Waugh, Green and Logue, upon 
their admission to the bar. May 
th<*‘ "areers be long and full of 
ATION ! 



SIGMA UPSILON. 

Literary Fraternity Grows in Size 
and Distinction — Interesting 
Short Story Contest Inaugur- 
ated. 

The progress which the Sigma 
I Upsilon Literary fraternity has J 
made during the past few years, 
under the leadership of Dr. Kern, 
has been one of the most notice- 
able things in fraternal cireles. \ 
In addition to the chapter that 
was recently established at the [ 
University of Texas, the advisa- 
bility of granting charters to lit- ) 
erary clubs at Knox College — | 
George Fitch’s original Siwash [ 
college, — Trinity and University 
of South Carolina, is being con- 
sidered by the fraternity council. 
The distinction which this fra- j 
ternity has come to enjoy and the 
uplifting influence which it exerts 
over the literary standard of a J 
school indicate that it is an or- ■ 
ganization which, you might say, 
fills a long felt want. Its pur- 
pose is “To promote and foster 
the literary spirit among the col- 
leges,” and to this end it devises 
ways and means of arousing in- 
terest and enthusiasm in literary 
work. One of the most interest- 
ing of these projects is a short 
story contest formulated at the 
last convention. Although the 
scheme is hardly a month old it 
has already met with a hearty re- 
sponse. and the Millsaps chapter 
alone has prepared two stories 
with which to compete and, the 
Purple and White predicts, win 
the prize. The rules of the con- 
test follow: 

1. Each chapter shall be al- 
lowed to invite a college literary 
club not affiliated with Sigma 
Upsilon to enter the contest. 

2. No club shall be allowed to 
submit more than two manu- 
scripts, and no club of Sigma L T p- j 
silon whose dues for the current I 
year are unpaid shall be allowed 
to enter the contest. 

3. Each contestant shall be at i 
the time of the contest an active ! 
member of the club which he rep- 
resents. 

4. The contestants shall send 
to the Secretary of Sigma Upsilon I 
three typewritten copies of their 
manuscript before April 1st. 
Those desiring the return of their 
manuscripts should enclose the 
necessary postage. 

5. The manuscripts shall be | 
graded on the basis of 100 by a 

(Continued on page 10) 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D„ President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



— il 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President 
S. C. Hart, Cash.er. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold hy supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



Cfte purple anO SBbttc 



9 



LOCALS You may think you can read 

that love which lies in her pretty 

G. W. Harrison, (“Bilbo ’) has eves. But that love often lies. 

been forced to leave school on ac- 1 

count of his health. We hope he ■ \y e regret very much to loose 
will improve rapidly and will the Rev . G. L. Lauderdale from 
soon he able to resume his studies. 0 ur ranks. “Giles,” as he is fa- 

Joe Spinks, one of the best boys m iliarly known, has taken an ap- 
in the school, has withdrawn and P°i n t men t Farmerville, La., 
will enter the Normal at Hatties- 1 and wiU be chief “ sorter ” of his 
burg, where he will be the rest of dlstn ct. 
the session. There is general re- ( 

great at Spinks’ departure. Rev - A - F - Smith - of the Fir st 

.Methodist Church, this city, con- 

Bob Harmon (after the game , ducted chapel exercises Friday 
Friday night ) : I don t want to morning and spoke some en- 

go to sleep tonight. couraging words to the boys just 

Henry : Why ? before they entered examina- 

iJarmon: “I’m afraid I’ll tions. 

we got beat.” ; . 



^ Her 

K 



G. C. Clark, Troy Harkey and | Dr. °. G - Davidson came over 
^ D. Cameron, alumni of the Phi fr0 “ Clinton Tuesday afternoon 
Jocal organization, were in- t0 attend the monthly meeting of 
*o the Kappa Sigma fra- the Kit - Kat Club Tuesday night. 
Hiday night Their 1 Dr- Davidson is well remembered 
re glad to see b - v tbe °^ der fellows as the Pro- 
pus once more. fessor of Modern Languages at 
Millsaps a few years past. He 
A. G. Gainey, principal of the now holds the Chair of Modern 
Mount Olive High School, visited Languages at Mississippi College, 
friends on the campus Saturday. M e hope he will see fit to pay us 
Gainey highly praises the people 'another v*it sr on 
of his little city and says he is 




giving them the best in his store 
of knowledge. 




There was “weeping and wail- 
ing and gnashing of teeth.” at 
the shacks last Saturday morn- 
ing when it became known that 
two of the best men, in the per- 
sonages of Messrs. Rucker and 
Patterson, were leaving those 
ancient places of abode. We 
miss them greatly, but it would 
be selfish in us to weep over the 
loss of them. May they go on 
their way rejoicing and may all 
be peace and quietness around 
them wherever they abide ! 

TRACK WORK. 



Training Begins, Good Results 
Expected. 



THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath, Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 

I .Mt.iT.AOL” 



Applicants for the track team 
are beginning to make their ap- 
pearance on the athletic field 
every afternoon that the weather 
permits. Although the team is in 
the embryonic state now and 
nothing definite can, at this time, 
be said concerning the personnel 
of the team and the records which 
they expect to make, the deter- 
mined spirit which leads some of 
our veteran track men to begin 
practice at this early date would I 
| indicate that Manager Harmon j 
j will have a team this year that 
j will be heard from at the state 
meet. 




The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI, j 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST ] 
GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 ROOMS \ 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. 

Cumberland Phone 66. 



L. M. GORDON, Manager. 
Home Phone 366. 



J. D. GORDNN & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 



10 



rm- «* 



€be Purple anh fflbite 




The fraternities will have their 
annual initiation Saturday night. 
Feb. 1. 



BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



L. A. Phillips, better known as 
“Red,” spent several days on the 
campus recently. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 



The Class of ’87 of the Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute. Troy, 
N. Y., has presented it with a new 
gymnasium at a cost of $150,000. 
The gymnasium has been built and 
j is now in use. It contains a swim- 
ming pool 30 feet by 75 feet in 
size, bowling alleys, rooms for in- 
side baseball, basketball, handball, 
boxing, wrestling, a squash court 
and the main gymnasium for gen- 
eral athletic exercise. The build- 
ing is equipped throughout with 
the most approved modern ap- 
paratus. It is built of Harvard 
brick with limestone trimmings 
and is fire proof throughout. 




A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody & Co., Makers 



Rensselaer 



Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



Polytechnic 



lim 



engine 
and Sc 



eerrng 

ience 



Institute 



Courses In Civil Engineering: (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
pineering (M. E.). Electrical Engineering (E. tj, and 
Wen era I Science (B. S.). Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

llOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



(Continued from page 8) 
committee of three professors, 
chosen by the Secretary from col- 
leges in which there are no con- } 
testing clubs. The contestant J 
whose manuscript receives the | 
highest combined grade shall be 
declared the winner of the eon- j 
test. In case of a tie between two 1 
or more contestants, the prize 1 
shall be awarded to the one the 

t 

sum of whose relative standings 
shall be highest. 

6. Upon receiving the grades 
of the committee, the Secretary j 
shall forward the same to the j 
President, who shall thereupon 
officially declare the winner of 
the contest. 

7. The prize shall be a ring 
having the scarab as a setting. 

8. In case the winner is not a j 
member of Sigma Upsilon. he j 
may be elected an honorary mem- j 
her by the chapter which invited 
him to enter the contest. If he 
is not so elected, he shall receive 
$10 in gold as a prize. 



THE 

“ WHO M ADE-THEM - FOR - YOU ” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 



Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 



Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp 
Johnston & Murphy and Heywoo 
Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 



For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 






Advertise In The Purple 
and White 




Yard Mill Street. 

Cumb. Phone 530. 

D. E. MARTIN 

Dealer in 

Coal, Wood and Kindling 

We Solicit Your Business. 
Orders Promptly Filled. 




THE JACKSON SANATORIUM, Jackson, Miss. 

(Opposite the West Side of the Governor’s Mansion) 

A modern Hospital, thoroughly equipped, especially for Surgical 
Cases. Open to all the Doctors and every patient regardless of 
creed or religion. Homelike comforts. Annex for colored patients. 
GRADUATE NURSES FURNISHED THE PUBLIC ON APPLICATION. 





Vol. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1913. 



No. 15 



FRATERNITIES INITIATE. 



Freshmen Pass Through Trying 
Ordeal. 

Young lady, meeting a certain 
Millsaps freshman at Sunday j 
school: “What’s the matter, 

Jim, you look all cut up over 
something?” The said freshman 
swells out chest so that the beau- 
tiful jewel pin reposing there 
may be the more easily seen. 
,“Yes, that bunch did run me 
thru a gin last night.” Which 
was an exaggeration, they didn’t 
run him thru a gin at all. They I 
merely ran him thru a sage brush 
into a barb wire fence and over a 
telephone post. As an explana- 
tion of the above it might be well 
to add that Saturday night. Feb. 
1st, the fraternities at Millsaps 
held their regular initiation. Sun- 
day morning twenty-three fresh- i 
men went to church and Sunday j 
evening twenty -three freshmen 
went to see their best girls. The 
reason for this outpouring is oh- j 
vious. 

On account of the regulation 
that no fraternity can initiate 
freshmen until they have passed 
their first examination. Feb. 1st 
was the day set for this moment- 
ous occasion. All day Saturday 
exceedingly nervous young men 
could be seen about the campus, 
and one out that way that night 
might have seen groups of mourn- 
ful looking figures led as if to 
their execution. 

The initiations went off with- 
out a hitch and the following 
went with them : 

Kappa Alpha: McClure, Moore. 
W. B.. Backstrum, Perry. Capps. 
Hilzim and Watkins. 

Kappa Sigma: McNeil, McNeil. 
Tatum. Tatum. Kirkpatrick. Car- 
rawav. Johnson, H. G.. McLaurin, j 
Frazier, Hendricks. Henry and 
Moore, R. G. 

^ Pi Kappa Alpha : McLain, W. 
C.. Johnson, M.. Brown and Page. 



Athletics' 



Millsaps Divides Honors With Mississippi College 



TWO GAMES TO BE PLAYED HERE SEVENTEENTH AND 
EIGHTEENTH— MILLSAPS MUST WIN BOTH. 



In a very snappy and exciting game Millsaps was defeated by 
Mississippi College by a score of 24 to 17. Millsaps, having played 
almost all together on an indoor court, was handicapped by having 
to play on an outdoor court. The game was very exciting, though, 
and Millsaps defeat was due largely to the star playing of Ballenger 
and Wood. The score was almost tie, up until the last two or three 
minutes of play, when Mississippi, by a succession of rapid plays, 
piled the score up beyond the reach of Millsaps. 

The story of the second game was told in a very different way. 
Revenge was indeed sweet. Millsaps was so confident of Missis- 
sippi’s scalp, and so eager were they to get at the Mississippians 
that, fearing the train would he late, they drove through the coun- 
try in order to be sure to be there on time. The game was called 
at the usual time and it was some time before either side was able 
to score. Both teams were in the very best of form, and it could 
easily be seen that a fierce struggle was on. Frasier pitched the 
first goal for Millsaps. and he was immediately followed by Harmon. 
With the score 4 to 0 the Mississippians realized that they had to 
play like they never had played before. It was not only the team 
that realized their situation but also the Umpire, who was a Missis- 
sippi College man, for during the first half he called about ten fouls 
on Millsaps while Millsaps did not get over three. The first half 
ended with the score 11 to 8 in favor of Mississippi, but any fair- 
minded person could clearly see that Millsaps had played much the 
better game. 

In the second half Millsaps proved her superiority. The slight 
lead was soon overcome and the game was never again in doubt. 
Every man on the team played star ball and deserves the highest 
credit possible. The real feature of the game was a goal pitched 
by Bob Harmon. He pitched it from a very difficult position and at 
the same time being crowded by a fast player. Prof. Burton de- 
serves credit for the way he stands by the team. Once during the 
game the ball was out and should have been thrown in by a Millsaps 
man but a Mississippi man threw it. in and resulted in a goal for 
Mississippi. Prof. Burton interferred and the points were not 1 
counted. The final score was: 24 to 18 in favor of Millsaps. 



Mississippi. 


Positions. 


Millsaps. 


Henson 


F 


Harmon 




. F 


Frasier 




C 


Kirkland ' 


Luke 


- G 


Gaddis 



Ballinger G - - Cook I 



Quite a bunch of fellows went 
over to see the basket ball games 
at Mississippi College last week. 



The Mississippi bunch will play on our grounds the seventeenth 
and eighteenth and the Millsaps rooters are confident of getting their 
goat. 



BOSWELL CHOSEN TO 
REPRESENT THE COL- 
LEGE IN M. I. 0. A. 

Wroten Selected for the Crystal 
Springs Chautauqua — Crocket, 
Alternate. 



On last Tuesday afternoon the 
faculty in committee of the 
whole, making their decision on 
I speeches delivered before them, 
selected H. H. Boswell to repre- 
sent Millsaps in the M. I. 0. A. 
This is the biggest honor that the 
faculty can confer upon any man 
during his stay at the college, 
j That the honor has been well dis- 
posed no one will deny. In the 
matter of grace and ease on the 
stage Boswell exceeds anyone of 
whom the writer has any knowl- 
edge. In eloquence, he is unsur- 
passed. In writing a speech he is 
equal to any. He demonstrated 
1 his ability as an orator by gain- 
ing an unanimous decision of the 
judges at Crystal Springs last 
summer. Boswell is a leader in 
| the student body. They have 
faith in his ability to win, and 
they are with him to the finish 
| at the contest. No one doubts but 
that he will follow his example of 
last summer and win fresh glory 
for himself and his college this 
spring. 

In the selection of Wroten to 
represent the college at Crystal 
Springs this summer, the faculty 
made a wise choice. Indeed, it is 
considered a foregone conclusion 
that he will win. He is a grace- 
ful, eloquent and forceful speak- 
er. He has won every medal that 
he has spoken for since he came 
to Millsaps, having won both the 
freshman and sophomore medals. 
He will have the united sup- 
port of the students, for he is one 
of the most popular men in 
school. In our opinion, it will be 
almost impossible for our sister 
colleges to produce speakers who 
will defeat Wroten and Boswell. 

In Crocket as alternate, the 
faculty chose the rising star of 
Millsaps oratory. We are confi- 
(Continued on page 2) 




Che purple anD Wfoitt 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan. Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

FTank T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

H. F. Magee President 

W. E. Hobbs Vice-President 

T. W. Harrison Secretary 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton President 

W. O. Brumfield —Vice-Presidf nt 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President ; 

C. W. Alford Vice President I 

L. B. Bufkin _ Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer J 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain. Treasurer j 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom...* Vice President 

C. Bullock .... Secretary ! 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer I 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E.' Morse 
Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. gn 

Lamar Speaker. 

H. H. Boswell .Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott -Anniversary Orator. 

J. T. Weems..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

......Commencement Debaters 

R. El. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters j 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator j 

W. E. Morse .Millsaps-Hendrix Debater | 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

j W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President J 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer j 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President I 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson ....Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F . T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. B F. L Magee n Business Managers 

HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

Clerk 

AUTHOR’S CLUB. 

On Wednesday, Jan. 29. the 
Authors Club was organized with j 
six charter members. The Pur- 
pose of the club is to stimulate 
and foster an interest in original 
literary productions, and it aims 
to benefit and help its members, j 
who are all interested in original 
literary effort. In connection ! 
with the general work of the I 
club, various courses in reading, 
story writing, etc., will be under- 
taken. The membership of the 
club is limited to ten members. 
An applicant for membership 
must have an interest in the work 
of the club and submit an original 
manuscript to be passed on by the 
club. 

The members of the club are: 
Officers — V. G. Clifford. Chief 
Scribe ; Miss Stella McGhee, Lit- 
tle Scribe; C. H. Blewett. Scrib- 
bler. Members- — Miss Birdie Grey 
Steen, Dramatist : Miss Evelyn 
Spickard, poet, and G. P. Fant. 
Novelist. Honorary Member — Dr. 

A. A. Kern, critic. 



(Continued from page 1) 
dent that that star will not Set till 
it has won the state medal for 
Millsaps next session. 

Crockett was the only junior 
in the preliminary contest and for 
this reason is he especially to be 
congratulated on winning a place. 



“Dunlap" Hats jackson-s greatest store “Regal” shoes 



$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



S. J. JOHNSON “S” 

COMPANY lOlloIS 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Ilapp PRICE Manhattan Shirts 

8 y | ea d known as the best 

S,:$15 to $25.00 «£. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work. Right exercise makes you 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Bafl Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Big F 


resh Stock of 




HUDNUT’S 

• 

COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



He won the freshman medal year sissippi A. & M. He can be 
before last and last year won the counted on to produce the goods 
sophomore medal and the sopho- if either of the other speakers are 
more debaters medal against Mis- unable to appear in their contest. 



\ 

Cfre Purple anP CTitc 



3 



Y. M. C. A. 



President Watkins Speaks to 
Association. 



The Y. M. C. A. met again on 
Friday night to resume its regu- 
lar meetings, it being the custom 
to dispense with these meetings 
during examinations. There were 
other things to keep the student 
body away on this occasion, 
nevertheless, quite a number of 
faithful members met in the As- 
sociation hall at the time for 
meeting. 

Mr. Wroten conducted the 
opening exercises and in present- 
ing Dr. Watkins, made the state- 
ment that the members of the Y. 
M. C. A. are proud of the fact 
that we have a college president 
who not only comes to its meet- 
ings but is willing to speak to us 
on these subjects of so vital im- 
portance to the student life. The ! 
Association should be and is 
deeply indebted to Dr. Watkins 
for his presence and helpful 
words from time to time. 

President Watkins read from 
the thirteenth chapter of Second 
Corinthians and took as a basis 
of his remarks the following 
words: “Examine yourselves 

whether ye be in the faith; prove 
your own selves.” In connection 
with this the speaker said that it 
contained two things: First, a 

test as to whether or not Christ 
is in the heart and life of a man 
and, second, an exhortation to a 
man to try himself and see 
whether Christ is in him. Just 
here it seems that the Corin- 
thians must have been affected by 
the belief that Paul was not a 
true apostle, inasmuch as he was 
not one of the original number. 
But Paul comes back with a two- 
fold argument : First, he shows 

how that if the Corinthians are 
following him and are walking in 
the true faith he, the medium 
through whom that faith has come 
must also be in the true faith. 
Then he presents to them the fact 
from which they cannot escape, 
namely, that he has received his 
commission from Christ himself, 
that he has talked with the Sa- 
viour of the world and from Him 
received the command to go and 

* ich all nations of the truth of 
rist. 

The command to know our- 
selves comes most often, so the 
speaker said, to those who are in- 
clined to know every one but 



themselves, to those who are in- : 
dined to criticise other people 
rather than examine themselves. 
However, it is very difficult for a 
person to have an unbiased opin- 
ion concerning himself. Here the 
speaker made the distinction be- 
tween respect of oneself and 
selfesteem. A man must have 
selfrespect in order that he may 
carry himself above those things 
which the world even would not | 
condemn. It is also important 
that a man know also the things 
about him. Every man is good 
for something in the world. It 
has been so arranged that there 
is something each person can do 
and do well. But it not always 
that a man falls into the sphere 
for which he is fitted, simply be- 
cause he allows his course to be 
chosen for him or chooses it with- 1 
out consideration of the thing he 
is capable of doing. 

In conclusion. Dr. Watkins dis- ! 
cussed the tests by which it is de- 1 
cided in regard to spiritual life. 
First, is the test of the attitude 
toward Christ, whether we think 
of Him with joy or not ; whether 
our leisure thoughts, the real test 
of a man’s nature, are high and 
holy. And, again we must meas- j 
ure our lives by the word of God { 
as applied by the Holy Spirit in I 
answer to prayer. It makes no J 
difference what we think but j 
what God says that counts in the ] 
final reckoning of our lives. 

MRS. SWARTZ ENTERTAINS. 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 

T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J/ Z W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 

Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 

DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210/ 2 West Capitol St. 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 



WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 



The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 

I, 

Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



- 



JACKSON, 



MISSISSIPPI. 



DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 



The Jones Printing Company logan philips 



Jolly Crowd Participates in Game 
of Rook. 



On last Wednesday evening 
Dr. and Mrs. Swartz again open- 
ed their attractive home to the 
young people who are always so 
glad to come at their invitation. 

Hotly contested games of Rook 
made the evening pass quickly 
and the young people who never 
realize the passing of delightful 
hours could not believe that it was 
time to bid their charmig host 
and hostess goodbye. Most deli- 
cious refreshments consisting of 
a salad course followed by ice 
cream and cake was served. 

Those who enjoyed the gracious 
hospitality of Dr. and Mrs. 
Swartz were: Misses Watkins, 

Smith and Linfield. Messrs : 
Scott. Boswell and Broomfield. 

The way of the transgressor is 
well written up. 



DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 Narth State St. JACKSON, MISS. 

OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



I Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited, 
j 108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, MISS. 
S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



MAGEE - HAWKINS 


COMPANY 


Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 


| West Jackson 


Mississippi 



BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Fonr Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 




€t)c ffucple anD mbite 



C!)e Purple ana COfnte 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

P. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Fditor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief. and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 



Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2. 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son. Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3. 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1 .50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



THE BASEBALL OUTLOOK. 



Baseball practice begins with- 
in the near future, and it begins 
with the brightest prospects un- 
der which it has begun since the 
privilege of playing inter-collegi- 
ate baseball was granted Millsaps. 
With Mr. Harry Peaster Coach- 
ing the team our baseball fans are 
expecting wonders. And there is 
no reason why great things 
should not be attained. Peaster 
knows the game both theoretical- 
ly and practically. He has played 
it himself for sometime and with 
great success. He has himself 
been under some of the best base- 
ball coaches in the South. There 
is no doubt that he can produce 
the results if he has the material. 

And that brings up the other 
question: What of the material? 
It seems probable that there will 
be no lack of men to work with. 
Nine of last year’s men are back, 
including the subs. We don’t 
know how many new men there 
are who are going to try out, but 
we know of nine who are promi- j 
nentlv mentioned as men who ! 
will make the team if the old 
men don’t watch out. There are, 
no doubt, more than this number 
who have an idea that they would 
like the honor and who are going 
to fight for a place on the team. 
Of the old men two were last j 
year’s star pitchers. Of the new 
men two have some reputation as 
twirlers. No place on the team 
will go uncontested. Surely a 



good man will be found for every 
position. 

In view of the above considera- 
tions. there can be no doubt that 
Millsaps will produce the best 
team this year that it has ever 
gotten out. No one need be sur- 
prised if she plays for the cham- 
pionship at the contest. And 
right now it may not be amiss to 
say a few words to the fellows in 
regard to supporting the team. 
It will need support financially 
and otherwise. It will need you 
out at the practice games. It will 
need to hear you say that it is 
going to win. Don’t knock it. 
Leave all that for the other fel- 
low to do. The fellows who are 
trying for the team will need 
your encouragement when they 
become disheartened over ther 
prospects of making the team. 

An excellent schedule, both at 
home and abroad, has been ar 
ranged and your help is neces 
sarv to make the season a sue 
cess. 



OUR HONOR ROLL. 



The Purple and White publishes 
for the first time, we believe, a 
distinction list, or honor roll, for 
j the first half year’s work. It has 
been the custom, heretofore, to 
publish at commencement a list 
of all students who have made an 
average of ninety or better for 
the year. We are publishing a 
I list at this time with the hope 
that it may serve to encourage 
those whose name does not ap- 
pear on the list, to strive to merit 
I a place on it at the end of the 
I year and_ for those whose name 
j does appear on it in some studies, 
to strive to increase this number. 

We admit that this is no easy 
thing to do. With the system of 
grading that is in vogue at Mill- 
1 saps, the making of an average 
grade of ninety for the year re- 
quires that a man shall ever be 
on the alert — that he shall pre- 
pare each lesson each day and 
prepare them in. a thorough, 
painstaking manner. Yes, it is 
hard to to make excellent grades, 
but then the harder the task the 
more honor there is in accom- 
plishing it. and the greater the 
obstacles to be overcome the 
greater the benefit to be derived 
from surmounting them. 

Then, too, after all, the primary 
thing for which we are here is 
the search of knowledge, and that 
means study — of course we would 



not belittle the benefits to be de- 
rived from the different phases 
of college life, such as athletics, 
the Y. M. C. A., the literary so- 
cieties, etc. We most heartily en- 
dorse them all and consider that 
a man is not just to himself nor 
to his school if he doesn’t take 
an active part in some or all of 
them, but we would not have 
him carry them to such an excess 
that he neglect his classes and 
forget that to excel in his class 
work is an honor worth striving 
for. 

Now is the time to resolve to 
have ycflir name on the distinc- 
tion list in the commencement 
courier next June. You can do 
it. if you will. 

CONTESTS. 



Two events of great import- 
ance to the undergraduates will 
| be held within the next two 
weeks — that is the preliminary 
‘ contests for the Sophomore and 
Freshman medals which occur 
next Tuesday and Tuesday week, 
respectively. 

The importance of these con- J 
tests should be realized by every i 
one. Practically every man in 
both classes should take part in 
these preliminary contests. | 
j Whether he wins a place in the I 
1 final contest or not he will have 

I 

1 been benefited by the effort and 
his loss will serve to show him 
{ that he is the man who most 
I needs to participate in such 
events and that he should deter- 
^mine to take advantage of the op- j 
portunities lie has at Millsaps 
and develop his talent along this [ 

I line. 

The advantages to be derived | 
from public speaking are too nu- * 
merous to mention. Speaking 
gives a man the power of collect- 
ing his thoughts and expressing ! 
the facts which he has acquired. 
It gives him a poise and confi- 
dence that will be of inestimable | 
value to him in after life, no mat- 
ter what his profession may be. 

We urge the members of the 
j lower classes to take part in these ! 
contests. Go into them with a de- 
| termination to win and work to 
this end. then whether victory or 
defeat falls to you as your por- 1 
t tion. you will not only have the 
satisfaction of knowing that you 
I have done vour best, but will ; 
have the praise and commenda- 
J tion of your friends. 

Then. too. you will have done 



your part towards making some 
other fellow work harder for his 
place and will in this way do 
your part towards helping uphold 
the prestige and standard which 
Millsaps has set in oratory. C 

PRES. HULL’S ADDRESS 



Before the Mississippi Teachers 
Association. 



Copies of the address of Dr. 
D. C. Hull, ex-president of Mill- 
saps College and at present 
superintendent of the Meridian 
schools, before the Mississippi 
Teachers Association, have re- 
cently been distributed on the 
campus. It can be said without 
fear of contradiction, that this is 
one of the greatest speeches ever 
delivered before that body. Cer- 
tainly it has attracted more wide- 
spread attention than any other. 

Dr. Hull treats his subject, 
“Our Educational Problem,” 
with his characteristic forceful- 
ness. As a solution of the pro- 
blems he recommends, in the first 
place, the creation of an educa- 
tional board consisting of nine 
members to be appointed by the 
Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate. The hardest part of our 
problem, in Dr. Hull’s opinion, is 
to get the control of our State 
colleges and the University and 
the public schools out of the con- 
trol of politicians. 

Another thing of great import- 
ance advocated by Dr. Hull, is 
better financial support. With 
more finances will come better 
teachers, longer terms, and a 
more enlightened community. 
With a great flood of emigrants 
fixing to swoop down upon us. 
Mississippians must be well edu- 
cated. must be prepared to save 
our institutions from probable 
downfall. As a means to this end 
more money must be spent on 
public schools. College bred men 
must be the teachers. The four 
months term must be done away 
with and the not less than six 
months term put in its place. 
Rural schools l^lst have attention 
and be developed. 

Dr. Hull ended his address with 
an appeal for superannuated 
teachers. He thinks that men 
and women who have given their 
lives to the cause of education 
should be pensioned when they 
are no longer able to make a liv- 
ing. Dr. Hull’s views are all 

(Continued on page 8) 




Che Purple anD Wbitt 



5 



KAPPA SIGMAS ENTERTAIN. 



Delightful Informal Chafing-dish 

Party Enjoyed by Frat Men 

and Friends. 

On Friday evening, Jan. 31, the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity once 
once more threw open the doors 
.of its handsome palatial home, 
Galloway Hall, to welcome their 
friends to a delightfully informal 
chafing dish party. 

This is the first entertainment 
that the Kappa Sigma’s have 
given since their consolidation 
with the Phi Deltas and the 
friends of all the boys were anx- 
ious to avail themselves of an in- 
vitation, knowing that the com- 
bined talent of these two frater- 
nities would make their social 
functions even more delightful. 

The elegant reception suite 
was an attractive place when 
filled with the lovely bevy of 
girls whom the Kappa Sigmas 
had invited to “make merry” 
with them Friday night. Deli- 
cious welsh rarebit and candy 
were soon made by these dainty 
cooks. These concoctions were 
much enjoyed, not only because 
they were delicious, but because 
of the fun and merriment stirred 
in while cooking. Those who en- 
joyed the delightful hospitality 
of the Kappa Sigmas were as fol- 
fows : Misses Randal, Taylor, 

Edmonds, Atkinson, McGehee, 
Evans, Saunders, Gillerlyn, Cock- 
rill, Curry, Atkinson, Galloway, 
Shurlds, Buck, Lowther, Steen, 
Mayers. Magruder, Wilkerson. 
Coffey, Moseley, Eastling. Cavett. 
Messrs. Ward, Carraway, Gath- 
ings, Brewer, McNeil, McNeil, 
Russell, Galloway, Hendricks, 
Thompson, Johnson, Harris, 
Montgomery, A. A. Green, Ed 
Green, Cavett, Moore, Morse, 
Bailey, Wroten, Ray, Henry, 
Henry, Kirkpatrick, Frazier, 
Hathorne, Cassibrv, Clifford, 
Harmon, Chichester, Baker, Rod- 
gers, Evans, Johnson, Prof and 
Mrs. E. T. Burton and Prof and 
Mrs. G. L. Harrell. 



Quite a number of the students 
went over to Clinton Friday and 
Saturday evenings to witness the 
basket ball games between Mill- 
saps and Mississippi colleges. All 
report a delightful time. 

Chalmers Potter came down | 
from University to the K. A. in- 
itiation last week. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



Judge Williams Hears Interest- 
ing Case. 



A highly interesting case was 
brought up before the Moot 
court last Monday night. It hap- 
pened that the defendant had 
rented a horse from a Clinton 
livery stable and driving him 
too hard coming into Jackson, 
the horse dropped dead for which 
cause the plaintiff sued for the 
value of the horse. 

The points were hotly contest- 
ed on both sides — each attorney 
fighting every inch of ground. 
Talbot, Naison and Dabney were 
the lawyers for the plaintiffs 
while Butler and Dr. Carter con- 
stituted the defense. The jury 
rendered the verdict in favor of 
the defendant. 

The court has been meeting in 
the office of G. Edward Williams, 
one of Jackson’s most prominent 
attorneys. Williams has been 
presiding over the court in an 
able and impartial manner. He 
has shown the members of the 
law class many courtesies for 
which they are all grateful. 



Judge Whitfield was called to 
Hattiesburg today on legal busi- 
ness. 



C. E. Johnson, a graduate of 
the law and academic depart- 
ment. was in the city recently. 
He is associated with a good 
firm at Union now. 



S. I. Osborne, a rising lawyer j 
of Greenwood, mingled with old ; 
Millsaps friends the first few 
davs of the week. 



NOTICE TO SENIORS. 



All eadidates for degrees at j 
this commencement must furnish | 
secretary with following informa- 
tion on or before the tenth of 
this month: 

1. Name in full. 

2. Name of degree. 

3. List of work you offer for 
degree, including (a) work you 
have completed; (b) work you) 
are now taking. 

E. Y. BURTON, 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

Howe says he is getting very 
popular here lately; two letters 
in one week from Senator Hob- 
son. Gee! that’s going some. 




j You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 

i 

Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



ET JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

J\EmmoN’s 



j r^r 





MONOTYPE MACHINE PLANT 



Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss. These machines are 
used on the highest grade of catalogue and book work. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



6 



Cbe Purple ano &3frite 



LOCALS. 

Clyde Irving visited friends 
and frat mates on the campus 
last Friday and Saturday. 



W. E. Hobbs enjoyed a visit 
from his brother, Allen, the lat- 
ter part of last week. 



Robert Chichester came over 
from Edwards Saturday evening 
to the Kappa Sigma initiation. 



Luther Neill, a graduate of 
Millsaps, was over Saturday 
night from Madison where he is 
principal of the High School. 



Bell says he is a regular Jack 
Johnson when it comes to learn- 
ing math. Maybe he had better 
try his punching abilities awhile. 



J. K. Vardanian, Jr., is taking 
some special work under Prof. 
Burton with the view of trying 
entrance examination to Annapo- 
lis Naval Academy. 



Messrs. Parks and Pate, of Wa- 
ter Valley, have entered school 
for the second term and will J 
share our miseries with us until 
“the warm days of June.” 



Prof. Harrell: “What do you 
say about that, Jackson?” 

Jackson: “I don’t know ex- { 

actlv what to say, Professor, I 
haven’t read the lesson.” 



The Mississippi College hoys 
said W. W. Moore was “dead 
with old age ’ ’ if you judged from 
his mouth, for it has a been a 
long time since he shed his colt 
teeth. 



“Red” Adams, former student 
of Millsaps and for the last four 
years the star of the State Uni- 
versity foot ball team, was a visi- 
tor on the Campus Friday of last 
week. 

Mr. Williams Myers Colmer 
came up from D ’Lo last Saturday j 
to be present at the initiation of 
the Pi Kappa Alpha pledges. 
“Bill” says there is nothing like 
having nerve when you are teach- 
ing. 

Mr. Stanley, of the Tulane 
University, New Orleans, was | 
here Saturday to see Prof. J. M. I 
Burton in regard to the United 
Tennis Association which will be 
held in this city the first week in 
March. 



1 



We regret very much to lose 
Miss Louise Taylor, one of our 
popular co-eds, who left Monday 
of last week for Brookhaven, 
where she will enter Whitworth 
College for the remainder of the 
session. 



OCUBTY 

PINS & 

EMBLEMS 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 

We regret very much to lose' j }\p 

‘ 1 Tommy ’ ’ Burns, who has been 

forced to leave school on account of Millsaps College emblem 

of his health. He left last Mon- fo u ftons, fobs, medals, etc. 

} day for Phoenix, Arizona, where j 

he has accepted a position with an ^ C do all kinds of W atch 
old and reliable firm of that city. an( j J ewe J r y repairing at 

moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 




Mitchell Robertson of the city 
I is one of the new students who 
] has enrolled since Christmas. He 
is taking special work prepara- 
tory to taking the examination 
for entrance to U. S. Military 
Academv at West Point. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

IACKS0N 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Dr. Watkin’s suggestion to 
I lower your feet when you study J 
may be all right for certain mem- 
bers of the student body, but we 
fail to see what advantage it 
would give to certain others 
whose “grey matter” lies in their 
pedal extremities. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 

Jackson. Miss. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 

Advertise in PURPLE AND WHITE. 



Dr, Swartz filled the pulpit for 
Rev. F. H. McGee at Georgia 
Ridge last Sunday. Dr. Swartz 
says the people of that commu- 
nity are very enthusiastic over 
Millsaps’ prospects for the fu- 
ture, and he is expecting a num- 
ber of bovs from there next vear. 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



The preliminary contest for the TATOM SHOE CO. 

Sophomore medal will be held 



next Tuesday afternoon and that [ 
for the freshman medal next 
Tuesday week. There should he 
twentv fellows in each. 



415 East Capitol St. 



Prof. Harrell hit the nail on the 
head in chapel the other morning 
when he said that now is the time 
to earnestly take up the work of ! 
the literary societies. Excellent 
programs have been prepared for 
tonight and no member of either 
societv should he absent. 



The College Glee Club which 
was to have given an entertain- 
ment in the college chapel last 
Tuesday night was delayed on ! 
account of the illness of one of 
the men and will make its appear- 
ance here Saturday night. This is 
reported to be one of the best 
lyceum entertainments that will j 
he here this season and a great 
crowd is expected. 




Z. D. DAVIS, President. 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. 



AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 
W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders' Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.S32.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Waxkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



€be purple anD Wite 



7 



Our Leading Athletes 




Platt Adams.winner of the standing: hleh 
jump at the Olympic Games at Stock* 
holm last July, says: 

“ When / want to smoke, I want 
Tuxedo — always. A corking good 
nerve-steadier. I advise it for all 
jumpers." 



Join with other f nous Americans 
in Praising Tuxedo Tobacco 

T HE history of Tuxedo tobacco is unique in 
many respects. The now famous “Tuxedo 
process” — by which all the bite and sting is 
removed from the best old Burley tobacco — was 
discovered by Dr. R. A. Patterson, a physician of 
Richmond, Virginia, the founder of the R. A. Pat- 
terson Tobacco Company. 

Many of Dr. Patterson’s friends, because their 
mouths and throats were so sensitive, were com- 
pelled to deny themselves the comfort and satisfac- 
tion of pipe smoking. Like all other men, the 
Doctor realized that complete smoke delight was 
possible only with a pipe. So he put his scientific 
mind to work on the problem. 

He originated the now famous “Tuxedo pro- ' 
cess” of treating the mildest, sweetest, most 
thoroughly aged Burley tobacco — and the result was 




“pat” McDonald 

“Pat" McDonald, the big: New York 
policeman who won the 16-lb. shot put. 
'best hand," at the Olympic Games last 
summer, says: 

"A pipeful of Tuxedo for mine. 
It’s the best tobacco ever. I ac- 
tually feel stronger after a smoke 
session with Tuxedo." 



\ 




-r MARTIN SHERIDAN 

Martin Sheridan, winner of the discus 
event at the Olympic Games of 1904, 1906 
and 1908, and all-around athlete of note, 
lays: 

“ Tuxedo is a strong card with 
me. I advise all athletes to stick 
to Tuxedo. It is the one tobacco 
that will help them, keep them in 
trim, prevent them from going 
'stale' . Tuxedo leads — bar none. ' ’ 





J. I. WENDELL 

J. I. Wendell, who was second in the 120 
meter high hurdles at the Olympic Games 
last summer, says: 

"Tuxedo is my choice. I smoke 
it in preference to all other tobaccos , 
because it's a mild, cool smoke, and 
can't hurt my wind." 

V • “D- 



^Jtixedo 

The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 

Tuxedo grew rapidly in public favor without advertising; 
without any push of any kind, its natural growth reached the stu- 
pendous total of fifty or sixty million packages a year. Not until 
the past few months has it been possible to keep up with the 
demand for Tuxedo. Now increased facilities make it possible for 
every man to smoke this best of tobaccos. 

Famous Americans in every walk of life smoke and endorse 
Tuxedo. Our world-famous athletes — the men who triumphed 
for America at the Olympic Games in Stockholm — are among the 
thousands who declare that Tuxedo is not only extremely enjoy- 
able, but beneficial. 

Tuxedo has many imitators, but na-successful one — because 
no one has yet discovered the “Tuxedo process” that makes 
Tuxedo the most enjoyable pipe-smoke in the world. 

YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 

Famousgreen tin, with gold 1 A Convenient poach, inner- £ 
lettering, cnrvedtofitpocket 1UC lined with moisture-proof paper vC 



Illustrations 
are about one- 
half size of 
real packages. 








GASTON STROBINO 

Gaston Strobino. the plucky little runner 
who was the first American to finish In 
the Marathon classic at Stockholm last 
summer, says: 

"Tuxedo is the tobacco for the 
athlete. It never hurts my wind, 
and always steadies my nerves. 
Tuxedo for me." 







Matt McGrath, who hurled the 16-lb 
hammer further than anyone else in the 
Olympics at Stockholm last summer. 

says: 

“A T o athlete need fear to smoke 
as much as he wants, if he uses 
Tuxedo. It's a general help to 
any man. A pipeful of Tuxedo 
puts new life into me." 

facvot ibpe'&*e& 






8 



fl)f purple anD Cflfmc 



DISTINCTION LIST. 



Names of Those Students Who 
Have made an Average of 
Ninety or Better for the Half 
Term. 



Senior. 

Astronomy — G. H. Moore, Miss 
Smith. 

Psychology — Savage, Moore, 
Lester, Miss Smith, Harmon, R., 
Watkins, J. 

Biology — Harrison, Kirkland, 
Willingham. 

Education — Boswell, Bell, Fos- 
ter, Harmon, N. B., Miss Howard, 
Lester, Crockett, Clark, C. C. 

Logic — Boswell, Cooper, Lester, 
Cain, J. B. 

English — G. H. Moore, Miss 
Smith, Scott. 

Physics — Boswell, Honeycutt, 

Lester. 

Chemistry — Howe, Lester, Kirk- 
land. 

Sociology — Weems. 

Political Science — Lampton, 
Lester, Scott. 

Geology — Lester, Moore, Miss 
Smith. 

Junior. 

Physics — Savage, D. J. 

Economics — Savage, Bridges. 

Chemistry — Cooper, T. M., ; 
Howe. 

Biology — Cooper, Howe, Phil- j 
lips, Ward, Boswell. 

History — Savage, Miss Green, ] 
Cain. 

Latin — Savage. 

English — Cain, J. B., Savage. 

Chemistry — Cooper, Howe. 

Sophomore. 

English — Ray, Roberts, Miss j 
Carlisle. 

Mathematics — Brumfield, Bui - 1 
lock, Cooper, T. M., Gathings, 
Harrison. 

Latin — Bullock, Cain, J. B., j 
Miss Green, Clarice. 

French — Moore, G. H., Bell. 

Chemistry — Gathings, Harri- 
son, Keister. 

Freshmen. 

Latin — Miss Buck, Miss Ed- 
monds, Miss Lester, Miss Low- ; 
ther, Miss MeAlpin, Miss E. K. [ 
Steen, Miss Shurlds, Miss Mc- 
Neil, Miss Easterling. 

French — Miss Lester. 

German — Lester. 

English — Miss Buck, Miss Ed- 
munds, Miss Lester, Miss Shurlds, 
0 ’Donnell. 

Mathematics — Miss Buck, Miss j 
Lester, Miss Shurlds, Miss Me- ! 
Neal. Barrett, Moore. W. B., : 
Page, Regan. Tatum, W. S. 



History — Tatum, W. S., O ’Don- 
nell, Tatum, F. M., McClure, J. 
M.. Crisler, R. M., Hendrick. 

First German — -Miss Lester. 

First French — J. N. McClure, 
Miss McNeil, Miss Green. 

Bible. 

Miss Buck, Miss Carlisle, Miss 
Easterling. Miss Edmonds, Miss 
Harris. Miss Kline, Miss Lester. 
Miss Shurlds. Miss McNeil, Capps, 
Backstrum, Henry. E. E., Hollo- 
man, McClure. J., Moore. W. B., J 
O’Donnell. Tatum. F. M., Tatum. I 
W. S. 



DR. REED LECTURES. 



Noted Leader of Laymen Enter- 
tains Millsaps Students With 
Lecture on China. 



Dr. C. F. Reed, for seventeen 
years a missionary of the Metho- 
dist Church in China and the es- 
tablisher of the mission work of 
that church in Korea, made a 
highly interesting and instructive 
talk on the mission work in China 
and the political conditions of the 
East, last Tuesday morning. 

Dr. Reed is a very fluent and 
entertaining speaker and on ac- 
count of his long residence in the 
mission fields is thoroughly con- 
versant with conditions there and 
his talk was very much enjoyed 
by all those students who were 
fortunate as to hear him Tuesday 
morning. Quite a number of the 
students also heard Dr. Reed at 
Epworth Hall Wednesday even- 
ing on “The New Republic of 
China, Its Cause and Signifi- 
cance.” 

Dr. Reed is general secretary of 
the Laymen’s Missionary Move- 
ment of the Southern Methodist 
Church, with headquarters at 
Nashville, Tenn., and is making 
a tour of Mississippi for the pur- 
pose of arousing interest in the 
movement. 

Prof. Harrell sustains the same 
relation to the Mississippi Con- 
ferences that Dr. Reed does to the 
Southern Methodist Church. 

R. Earnest Steen, one of last 
year’s graduates is on the cam- 
pus now. 

(Continued from page 4) 

sound ones and no doubt will 
sooner or later be enacted into 
law. 

The Purple and White sincere- j 
ly hopes that every Millsaps man ! 
will read this masterful address. 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 




Che purple anO Wbitt 



9 



PRENTISS LITERARY 
SOCIETY. 



The prep literary society is the 
only one that has held a meeting 
since examinations. They held 
their first meeting since the burn- 
ing of the dormitory in the Y. M. ; 
C. A. Hall Friday night. 

As this happened to be the reg - \ 
•ular time for the installation of 
new officers the debate was dis- ; 
pensed with and the officers-elect 
requested to come forward and 
take the oath of office. The fol- j 
lowing officers then assumed 
charge of the society for the next 
quarter: President, Wm. Wil- j 

lingham; J. A. Wooten, secre- 
tary ; J. A. Davis, vice-president ; i 
G. W. Barrett, censor. After the 
installation of officers Keith Wil- 
liams read an essay, and N. Gold- 
ing and C. W. Alford delivered 
declamations entitled respective- I 
ly, “The Uncrowned Queen.” and i 
■“The Unknown Speaker.” 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



The following program will be 
rendered in the Lamar Hall to- 
night : 

Deelaimer — Ridgeway. 

Orator — C. C. Case. 

Debate — Resolved. That Mis- 
sissippi should have compulsory 
education. 

Affirmative — Weems, Patter- 
son, Lusk. 

Negative — Magee. Brown, Hol- 
loman. 

From the above one can' see 
that the Lamar’s have an un- 
usually attractive program for 
this occasion and a large attend- 
ance is expected. 



GALLOWAY SOCIETY. 



The Galloways will hold their 
meeting at the regular hour in 
the Galloway Hall tonight and 
have issued the following pro- 
gram : 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



R. E. HARLAND 

Proprietor 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 
DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Mississippi College will be over 
here soon for two games of basket 
ball. Let’s don’t let them get 
either one of them. 



Don’t miss the college Glee 
Club Saturday night. Its going 
to be great. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 



NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw, rds 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



Declamation — Tatum. F. M. 
Orator — Howe, D. W. 

Debate — Resolved, That Mis- 
sissippi should adopt the initia- 
tive and referendum. 

Affirmative — Willingham, Bul- 
lock, Frazier. 

Negative — Brown, O’Donnell, 

Wroten. 

The Galloways have established 
a reputation for rendering good 
programs and the one tonight 
promises to be among the best. 



Ward Seminary and Belmont 
College, both of Nashville, have 
combined, thus forming one of 
the strongest girls’ colleges of the 
South. 



From now on till the end of 
school will be busy times so if you 
have any back work or other out- 
side work to do, now is the time 
to do it. 



Ramsey Roberts has been quar- 
anteened in his home on account 
of his younger brother, Clay, hav- 
ing diphtheria. Here’s hoping he 
may be with us again soon. 



A large and enthusiastic au- 
dience witnessed the entertain- i 
ment given by the ‘ ‘ Collegians ’ ’ 
in the college chapel last Tuesday 
evening. All declared it the best j 
entertainment of the season. 



The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 

GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 ROOMS 

WEEKLY DANCES 

* 

W. N. DRIVER, Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDNN & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

4 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 



10 



€tje purple anD Mite 




BOXES AT 

10c, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 



CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 




A NEW 

ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody Sc Co., Makers 



FLOWERS. 

In Mississippi there are very few 
days in the year when we cannot 
have cut flowers, either wild or cul- 
tivated, or at least, pretty foliage. A 
plain glass vase of simple lines is 
always good taste. Some pickle or 
olive bottles have better lines than 
many of the ornate vases used. In 
the fall, the golden-rod, blackeyed 
Susans, asters, bright colored foliage, 
add brightness and beauty to the 
room. In the winter, the pine, mag- 
nolia. and other evergreens, are re- 
freshing and fragrant. In the spring 
we have such a wealth of bloom to 
choose from that it is not necessary 
to enumerate them. 

Do not crowd different kinds to- 
gether. Arrange as far as possible 
according to the nature of the plant. 
Long stemmed flowers, such as gol- 
den rod, should be placed in tall 
vases, while short stemmed flowers, 
such as violets, show to best advant- 
age in flat bowls. 

Growing plants are good when prop- 
erly cared for. It is better to have 
a few w^ell conditioned plants than to 
have the room cluttered with tin cans 
and decrepit boxes containing sickly 
plants. 

Choose only hardy plants, such as 
geraniums, cane plant, spingerea 
ferns, bulbs, etc., and give them the 
proper care. Newspapers placed be- 
neath the plants and windows will 
help to protect them from cold. Large 
flat vessels of water placed near 
plants serve the same purpose; but 
it is well not to have more than two 
or three growing plants through the 
winter unless they have proper pro- 
tection. 

Advertise in PURPLE AND WHITE. 



ROBB & CONANT 



THE 

‘ WHO M A DE-TH EM - FOR - YOU ” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 

• 

Advertise In The Purple 
and White 





THE JACKSON SANATORIUM, Jackson, Miss. 

(Opposite the West Side of the Governor’s Mansion) 

A modern Hospital, thoroughly equipped, especially for Surgical 
Cases. Open to all the Doctors and every patient regardless of 
crsed or religion. Homelike comforts. Annex for colored patients. 
GRADUATE NURSES FURNISHED THE PUBLIC ON APPLICATION. 



Rensselaer ~ 
Polytechnic 



Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



Engineering 
and Science 



Institute 



Photographers 

Work of any description un- 
dertaken. and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 



samples. Banquets, interiors and 

Courses in Civil Engineering (C. E.), Mechanical En- 
gineering ‘M. E.\ Electrical Engineering (E. K.), and pvtpfinr« Anv time env taIqoo 

General Science <E. S ). Also Special Courses. CAICI 1UTS. AD) Time. ail\ piaCC. 

Unsurpassed r.ew '..hcmical. Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. _ 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing ’RnQt. Hnnitnl St 

work of pradua'es and students and views of buildings /2 vdpilOl Ov. 

and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. JaCkSOU, MisS. 



Yard Mill Street. 

Cumb. Phone 530. 



D. E. MARTIN 



Dealer in 



Coal, Wood and Kindling 

We Solicit Your Business. 
Orders Promptly Filled. 







QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Vol. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1913. No. 16 



COLLEGE ORCHESTRA. 



Interest Revived and Reorganiza- 
tion Will Take Place at an 
Early Date. 



If there is any truth in the say- 
ing that silence is golden, then it 
is also true that our college or- 
chestra is worth its weight in 
gold, for we have heard nothing 
from it for some time. This con- 
dition however is largely due to 
the adverse conditions under 
which the orchestra has been la- 
boring. Examinations, initia- 
tions, the destruction of the dor- 
mitory, and other things have 
conspired to retard its progress, 
but now that these things are past | 
we feel sure that activities will 
again commence and renewed in- 
terest will be taken in the orches - 1 
tra of which we were so proud ! 
before Christmas. 

Millsaps is certainly capable of j 
producing an orchestra. We have 
the benefit of a splendid pianist, ! 
and in Mr. Logue we have an ex- 
cellent leader, as well as a most 
accomplished violinist. There are 
other members of the orchestra 
who have shown remarkable tal- 
ent, and if these, aided by the 
musicians in school who have not 
given any assistance up to this 
time, and aided by the hearty co- 
operation of the faculty, will once 
more enter into the work of 
making our orchestra a success, 
we have no doubt that we will 
soon be able to boast of one of the 



MILLSAPS WIN * 



Varsity Defeats Canton by Overwhelming Score — Kirkland Leads in 
Scoring — Gaddis and Cook Star on Defense. 



The Millsaps how “mopped” up with the basket ball team from 
Canton in the first grme Monday night. The Canton boys were out- 
classed in every respect. The Millsaps boys not only outweighed 
them but played all around them when it come to team work. Both 
when playing on the offense and defense did the Millsaps boys show 
the results of better coaching and training. 

One point that was especially noticeable was the fact that the 
home team did not make a single foul in the first half and only one 
during the whole game, while the fouls called on the visitors were 
numerous. 

All the Millsaps players got into the game from the very begin- 
ning and had the “pep” all the way through. Kirdland was the star 
of the game, when it come to offensive playing, with Harmon a close 
second. Kirkland secured eight field goals and Harmon six. Gaddis 
and Cook both worked well on the defensive and prevented their op- 
ponents from getting many clear shots at their goals. 

Frazier made good on three foul goals out of five tries. 

The Millsaps boys were never in danger; keeping the ball where 
they wanted it practically all of the time and never allowing the visi- 
tors to get within striking distance of their goal. 

For the visitors, Brenegan was the star — making most of the 
goals for them — shooting them from almost impossible angles. 

The final score was 41 to 10. in favor of Millsaps. 

The line up was as follows : 

Canton. Millsaps. 

Melton, Core C' Kirkland | 

Nickels. Evans F • Harmon 

Brenegan. Shackleford F Frazier I 

Slack , G — Gaddis 

Core, Nickels G Cook 

Umpire — Fletcher. Time of Halves — 20 minutes. Field Goals — j 
Frazier 4, Kirkland 8, Cook 1, Harmon 6, Brenegan 5. 

SCRUBS PLAY SECOND. 



CONTESTS GO TO ABERDEEN. 



Aberdeen, famous throughout 
the State for her excellent peo- 
[ pie, her enterprise and progres- 
l siveness, won a notable victory 
j over the other towns of the State 
[ when she succeeded in getting for 
j herself the next meeting of the 
M. I. 0. A. and M. I. T. A., to 
be held the second Friday in May. 

The executive committee, com- 
posed of’ representatives from 
Millsaps, Mississippi College. A. 
& M. and the University, met at 
the Edwards House, in this city, 
on the night of Feb. 7th, and aft- 
er considerable deliberation, unan- 
imously selected Aberdeen as the 
place. Other towns entering the 
contest were Jackson, Meridian, 
Hattiesburg. Greenwood and 
Columbus. 

That Aberdeen was very de- 
sirous of having the contest was 
made evident by the strength of 
the delegation of her prominent 
citizens which she sent to repre- 
sent her. They are proud of their 
town and wanted people to know 
how progressive it is and the in- 
ducements offered were sufficient 
to win the decision in their favor. 

Aberdeen is a progressive little 
city' of about 5000 people and is 
centrally located to the Universi- 
ty and A. & M. and is only about 
150 miles from Millsaps and Mis- 
sissippi College. Xt is also quite 
near Columbus and it is expected 
that a large delegation of I. I. & 
C. girls will attend. 



Pile Up Score 14-0 in First Half — Canton Boys Tried to “Rough it 
Up” But Were Easily Defeated. 

Coach Fletcher sent in his scrubs Tuesday' night to tackle the 
Canton bunch in the first half of the second game, Gaddis and Cook 
being the only regulars retained. The Canton boy's started in with 
a rush evidently with the intention of running over the local boys 
but somehow things got twisted and the visitors got the worst end 
legian Quartette was presented of the “roughing it up” as the superior weight and training of the 
as the third number on the Lv- collegians told on most every count. 

ceum Course. It entertained During the first half “Big Foot” Jones played star ball chunk- 
one of the largest crowds that has ing three goals. N. Harmon and Henry’ also played excellent ball, 
ever attended one of these attrac- Harmon getting two goals and Henry one. The scrubs showed that 
tions. Notwithstanding the ex- they too. can play basket ball and that all they want is a chance, 
ceeding coldness of the weather, Gaddis and Cook stayed right with their men all during the game 
(Continued on page 7) (Continued on page 5) 



best college orchestras in Missis- 1 
sippi. 

COLLEGIAN QUARTETTE 

Plays to Large and Appreciative 
Audience. 



On last Saturdav night the Col- 



The Monroe County Fair Asso- 
ciation has a half mile track en- 
closing a base ball diamond. The 
base ball game and track meet 
will be held here. The place for 
holding the oratorical contest has 
yet to be selected, but it is stated 
that there are several suitable 
buildings to select from. Among 
them the new city hall and the 
Monroe County court house. 

Millsaps is well satisfied with 
this selection and until May 9th 
y'ou may expect to be met with 
the greeting, “Well, I suppose 
you will go to Aberdeen f ” 





2 



€be Purple ano Mite 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

\A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Victe President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell ...Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

H. F. Magee President 

W. E. Hobbs Vice-President 

T. W. Harrison Secretary 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton. Preside at 

W. O. Brumfield .Vice-President 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President | 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President j 

T. M. Cooper Vice President | 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom... Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck.. Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey ' President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney... Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian | 

F. T. Scott ...—..Anniversary Orator j 

J. T. Weems. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

— — ...Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



Olin Ray 
J R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

j R. E. Selby 
j J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse -Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 1 

W. W. Moore 
| R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters j 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

-Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

I S B. Lampton President ! 

1 J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

| J. R. Spinks President i 

J A. B. Holder Vice President 

J S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer j 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates.. Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F . T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. ^^Magee-..’ . Business Managers 
HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems ..Chairman 

Clerk 

The Authors Club. 

The members of the Authors 
Club were delightfully entertain- 
ed last Wednesday evening at the , 
home of Miss Evelyn Spickard. i 
The subject discussed was the 
life and work of George W. 
Cable. This enthusiastic little 
band of young writers are much 
interested in the work they have 
undertaken and expect to make 

! their new organization a success. 

— 

PREP - LOCALS. 

Paul Greenway left for home I 
Saturday morning. 

We regret to say that L. H. : 
Gates will not be in school for 
the rest of the year, on account i 
of his health. We hope, how- j 
ever, to have him back with us | 
next year. 

o 

The Prep base ball team will 
start practice Monday ^if the 
weather permits. With the ma- 
terial which we now have on 
hand, we expect to get out a 
winning team. 

Prof. Rickets, speaking to Bir- j 
mingham, who had his feet prop- 1 
ped up on the desk: “Mr. Bir- 

mingham. just for a change, sup- 
pose you exhibit some of the eon- 1 
tents of your head.” 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5,00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE j “Rgga|” ShOCS 

S. I. JOHNSON hr* 

COMPANY j $3.5fl to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 > 



Standard of Perfection. 



PRICE | Manhattan Shirts 

! known as the best 
J1SUU5. 52 

' T " ' T | TRY THEM 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS— R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL. Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



€be Purple anD Wbitt 



3 



LAW NOTES. GALLOWAYS CONVENE. 



The class, and friends general- 
ly, are. very much gratified over 
the news that Judge William R. 
Harper is so rapidly improving. 
It is hoped by his family that he 
will be able to return to Jackson 
within the next two weeks. 

Mr. J. Andrew Blount was a 
visitor to his family at Collins 
during the last week-end. 

Mr. Ragusa, after a few days 
spent delightfully at the Carnival 
in New Orleans, is back in the 
class. 

Of course our good friend, 
Blount, is to be excused for get- 
ting his prayers mixed. The best 
of us sometimes get sleepy. 

A very interesting case was be- 
fore Judge Williams on last 
Wednesday night. Miss Sallie 
Honeysuckle was so unfortunate 
as to collide with a street car and 
after duly considering all her 
bruises and feelings otherwise 
hurt, concluded that the show 
was worth $5000.00. She was 
confirmed in this view by those 
chivalrous counsellors, Messrs. 
Currie. Blount and Russell, while 
Messrs. Thompson, Johnson and 
Smith grant that the show was 
good, etc., hut that $5000.00 or, 
as for that matter, any part of 
five thousand is too much money 
to pay for the same. The case is 
being hard fought on both sides 
and no doubt hut that justice will 
he the end. 



Arrangements are being made 
whereby another eminent Jack- 
son lawyer will lecture the class 
on some proposition of interest 
and importance. These lectures 
are very beneficial and we are 
very grateful for the spirit of 
generosity that prompts these dis- 
tinguished gentlemen to give 
them. 



The friends of Edward C. 
Brewer, who is in the law class 
at the University, will be glad to 
know that he is business manager 
of the year-book. “Ole Miss.” 



Several of our number have al- 
ready determined upon places of 
location. A few will leave the 
State and contribute to the 
wealth and legal lore there, while 
most of them will try “Ole Miss” 
for a round at least, before going 
elsewhere. 



Interesting Debate — Cassibry 
Installed as Third Term Presi- 
dent. 



The Galloways held a very in- 
i teresting session Friday night in 
the Y. M. C. A. Hall. The pro- 
gram included some of the best 
j speakers of the society and the 
' able manner in which each man 
responded to his duty showed 
that careful thought and prepara- 
tion had been given to the sub- 
jects. 

The first thing on the program 
was a declamation by Keister who 
delivered a declamation in a most 
1 commendable manner. Barrett, 
as orator, next came forward and 
gave the society a treat in the 
form of a well rendered oration. 

The question for debate was, 

I “Resolved, That the parcels post 
} is beneficial to the United States.” 
| Kirkpatrick. Moore and Bullock 
brought forth many arguments 
showing why this is true ; while 
! Edward. Willingham and Silver- 
stein argued so effectively for the 
negative that they carried the 
judges with them. 

The installation of the third 
term officers was the next thing 
to occupy the attention of the so- 
ciety. when the following officers 
! were installed : President, Cassi- 
bry : Vice-President, Broom ; Sec- 
retary, Moore; Assistant Secreta- 
ry, Keister. 

Next came the impromptu de- 
| bate which consisted of a very 
J humorous discussion of the sub- 
ject. “Resolved. That blue-eyed 
t girls can love harder than brown- 
I eyed girls.” Keister was elected 
monthly orator. 



LAMARS ON A BOOM. 

— 

Great and Enthusiastic Meeting 
Held Friday Night — A Renais- 
sance in Society’s Work — Scott 
Installed as President. 



Promptly at 8:15 o’clrfbk on 
j last Friday evening the members 
| of the Lamar Literary Society as- 
| semhled in the large and spacious 
j auditorium of the main building 
] to hold their weekly exercises. 

Tn the absence of the President. 
| F. H. McGee. Vice-President W. 
E. Hobbs took the chair and pre- 
sided over the meeting. The of- 
| ficers for the ensuing term were 
first installed, then the program 
(Continued on page 7) 



DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 
JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 

Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling. Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214^2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

i Mailed for Half Dollar. 

! 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


* 

Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 






DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210/2 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 


The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 north State St. JACKSON.' MISS 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOF? MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 

i 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 




BON-TON CAFE 



REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 




4 



Cl )C purple anD 031 )itc 



Oc Purple anD CMt e 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 



N. L. Cassibry ‘...Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett..: Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain..! Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 



Entered as second class matter, j 
fan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, j 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



LITERARY SOCIETY WORK. 

When they first come college, i 
if asked if they wish to be or in - 1 
tend to be a nonenity during their ; 
college course, ninety-nine out of 
every hundred boys would reply 
emphatically in the negative. And 
they mean it. Nearly every one of 
them has visions of the future. I 
They all intend to make their col- 1 
lege career amount to something, 
to make it count for the most. 
One of the first questions that is 
really asked of the new boy is, 
“Are you going to join a literary 
society?” If he is at all doubtful, 
he is told that he does not stand 
much of a show at Millsaps unless 
he does. He is told how that 
every man who has ever attained ; 
prominence here was an ardent 
and energetic member of one of 
the literary societies: how that 

every Millsaps alumnus who now 
stands high in the affairs of the \ 
State was when he was here, a 
leader in society work ; how that 
those who have come here and , 
not taken any part in this work 
are now generally low salaried 
clerks, bank runners, habitual 
loafers, or something of the kind. 
Hearing this, and remembering 
his visions, he at once says that 
he will join. About forty per 
cent really do this. 

Why is the percentage so 
small ? There are various rea- 
sons. Undoubtedly part of the ! 
blame is to be attributed to the 
boys themselves, tha ' is the boys I 



I 

v. ho do not join. Some of them ented young men of the fraterni- tunity to hear Judge Reed. 

I just keep putting it off. saying ty rendered delightful music with The subject as announced was, 

that they are going to join, but the orchestra they have formed “The Character of John the Ba'p- 

are not yet ready. Some want to among their own number. This list.” The speaker began by 



learn the town first, and instead 
of beginning right away to go to 
the society hall, they use Friday 
night in doing the town, with the 
result that they form a habit that 
they never quit. While much of 
the blame is thus disposed of, cer- 
tainly much of the Marne is due 
to Hie old men whose duty it is 
to get these men into the socie- 
ties. At first, of course, the old 
men urge the new ones to come 
in. but. after a little, they cease 
to mention it. Some of the old 
men who themselves do not be- 
long to the societies, hoot the 
idea of a new one joining, and 
thus many an one is led astray. 

The conditions at Millsaps this 
session in this matter are deplora- 
ble. Never before in the writers 
knowledge has there been so 
small a number of the new men 
to affiliate themselves with the 



lovely courtesy extended by the 
K. A’s will long linger and will 
remain a happy reminiscence in 
the minds of the guest who were 
fortunate enough to be invited to 
enjoy it. The young people were 
chaperoned by Dr. and Mrs. Wat- 
kins. 

Y. M .C. A. 

Judge R. F. Reed Discusses “The 
Character of John the Baptist.” 

The devotional committee of 
the Y. M. C. A. were unusually 
fortunate in the selection of a 
speaker for the last meeting. 
•Judge Richard Reed, formerly of 
Natchez, but now of this city as 
a member of the Supreme Court. 
Judge Reed is one of the most 
entertaining as well as forceful 
speakers in the State, and besides 



calling attention to the impor- 
! tance of the subject and the great- 
ness of the man. Perhaps na time 
j in history could have been more 
trying to a man of personal am- 
j bition than the time of John the 
Baptist. The world is likely to 
forget this man who gave his life 
for the cause of the Messiah even 
| before he had seen him. in think- 
ing of the glamor of the years 
that followed. As John said of the 
Christ, ‘ ‘ He will increase but I 
will decrease,” so it was. But 
the great character of John did 
not in the least consider these 
things. 

The speaker first took up the 
life of John. It is known that the 
members of his family were good 
people. No doubt this was one of 
I the great' influences of his life. No 
man can be more surely blessed 
than by the memory of a saintly 



societies. Never was there such | 
poor work done in the societies. 
We do not know and it is not our 
purpose to find out what these j 
new men are doing that they ! 
have not joined the societies, but j 
we do know that they are not I 
doing what they ought to. And it 
is also obvious that the old men 
are not doing their duty, else j 
new men would be in the socie- 
ties. and better society work 
would be going on. 

The session is now just a little 
over half gone. The race has not 
been finished. Let us resolve to 
end it successfully. Let us gel 
into this work ourselves and get 
as many -of the new men who have ; 
not already come in as it is pos- 
sible to get. 

KAPPA ALPHAS ENTERTAIN. 

Delightful Chafing Dish Party is 
Given. 

On Friday ev«fcing, Feb. 6, the 
elegant reception parlors of the 
Kappa Alpha cfiapte? house was 
the scene of muclUmerriment and 
gavety, for on that night these 
young collegians entertained their 
friends at a delightful - chafing \ 
dish party. 

The young ladies concocted de- 
licious refreshments on the chaf- 
ing dishes and the punch bowl 
was a popular resort. while 
throughout the evening the tal- 



a man whose spotless character father and mother. The parents 
and sturdy Christian manliness 0 f John the Baptist not only be- 
stand unmarred above any politi- longed to the priestly family, but 
cal agitation. Contact with such they were good people them- 
a man cannot but be beneficial to selves. The very circumstances of 
the young life, especially to the his birth were tokens of the fact 
young man in college, and for this that he had come to ful fill a 
reason Millsaps students are to i great mission. In his relationship 
be congratulated on this oppor- j to the Christ, in the fact that his 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of Sfate and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnallj r ’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



Cl )c Purple anD fofflme 



5 




father was stricken with dumb- 
ness, in all these were the signs 
of a life with a special work to 
perform. Not only in the song of 
his father but also in the earlier 
writers was his mission foretold. 

The great purpose of his life 
was. “To prepare the way of the 
Lord.” Just as in the olden days 
when men prepared roads in or- 
der that an Eastern monarch 
might pass with his retinue 
through the country, just so did 
John prepare the way for the 
coming of the Messiah. His was 
the task not to do the things that 
Christ would do, but to remove 
the obstacles of sin, of ignorance, 
and of superstition that the words 
of the Messiah might have their 
way in the hearts and lives of 
men. John’s message was a mes- 
sage of repentance. To the peo- 
ple of that time it meant even 
more than it means now. It meant 
not only a change of life but it 
meant a change of thought, of 
ideals, of those things which the 
people held dearest. 

As a preacher John was one of 
the greatest that the world has 
ever known. He used no clap- 
trap method of advertising, did 
not seek the busy centers but 
went away into the wilderness; 
and yet the crowds followed him. 
Not only the meek and lowly, but 
all classes of. people came out to 
hear him. The secret of his pow- 
er in drawing people was the fact 
that he told them the simple, 
straight-forward truth. The peo- 
ple were susceptible to the influ- 
ences of the truth in that day just 
as they are today. 



The speaker next considered 
the question of why John was 
great. The first thing of impor- 
tance was the fact that he was 
faithful to his mission. While it 
was a great and glorious mission, 
yet there were those things about 
his task that were unpleasant. 
But not for a moment did he fal- 
ter. Steadily, with but one pur- 
pose in view he marched boldly 
forward, loving those things 

which he came into the world to 
do. He did not depend on him- 
self for strength but kept in close 
touch with his Heavenly Father 
from whom he received the 

strength that would enable him 
to perform his mission. The 

speaker told of the possibilities of 
every young man’s life, if he 
would but allow himself to be 
used in the way that the Master 
would have him be. 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 



The Belhaven girls came out in 
full force last week on two occa- 
sions. one being the recital given 
by the Forbes Piano Company, 
the other the Glee Club Saturday 
night. It is useless to say that the 
Millsaps boys were delighted to 
have them both times. 



Dr. C. F. Reed, who was for 
seventeen years a missionary to 
China and at present head of the 
Laymans Movement in the L T nited 
States, made the student body an 
interesting talk upon the customs 
and habits of the Chinese last 
Wednesday morning at chapel. 



Jack Gaddis spent Sunday with 
home people at Bolton. 



Continued from page 1 

and didn’t give them even one single chance tt> take anything like 
a clear shot at the goal. The result was that the only two points 
made by the visitors were made on fouls. 

At the beginning of the second half Kirkland, Frazier and Bob 
Harmon went in and the ball from then on was in and around the 
Millsaps basket. 

Whatever else may be said about the visitors it must be given 
them that they were game in spite of the fact that they were slung 
around, knocked down and run over by the Millsaps, they fought to 
the end, and the Millsaps rooters got scared whenever they were 
dangerously near their goal. 

The line up for the second game follows : 

Millsaps. Canton. 

Henry, Kirkland ' C Core 

Gaddis -l.. _____ G Nichols 

Cook * G Slack 

Frazier, Jones F Evans 

B. Harmon, N .Harmon F Brenegan 

Summary : Goals from field — Frazier, 4 ; Jones, 3 ; N. Harmon, 

2; Kirkland. 1; Henry, 1; B. Harmon. 1. Foul Goals — Cook, 2; 
Nichols, 2. 

Referee— Fletcher. Score — Millsaps 26. Canton Athletic Club 2. 



MONOTYPE MACHINE PLANT 



Of the Tucker Printing House. Jackson, Miss. These machines are 
used on the highest grade of catalogue and book work. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 




6 



Cbe ffucple anO GMbitt 



LOCALS. 



George Harris is spending a 
few days at his home. 



Cook wants to know who in- 
vented electricity. 



Hobbs is still doing that good 
hair cutting. Shack 4. Price 25c. 

On to Aberdeen. Let’s mop up 
that day in base ball, track and 
oratory. 



Let T. B. Doxey do your tailor- 
ing and save the discount he 
gives to college boys. 

“Big” Ben Foster is on the | 
sick list at this writing. We wish 
him a speedy recovery. 



Miss Mattye Alford visited her 
brother, Callie Alford, on the | 
campus last Monday afternoon. 



The students were glad to see 
Homer Currie back in school aft- 
er an absence of more than a 
month. 



All we need now is some good 
weather, then that base ball prac- 
tice will begin. The boys are , 
ready and anxious. 



J. P. Waugh, of this year’s law ' 
class, is now practicing law at 
Goodman, Miss., and from all ac- 1 
counts is making good. 



Lewis Addington, a former 
Millsaps student from Water Val - 1 
ley, visited friends and frat mates 
on the campus this week. 

John Crisler, the efficient su- 1 
perintendent of one of the Vicks- 
burg schools visited friends and 
relatives in Jackson recently. 



Mr. A. R. Peets of Barlow, 
Miss., brother of the indomitable 
Randolph of ours, visited friends 
here Saturday and Sunday of last 
week. 



Messrs. Hillman and Scar- 
brough of the law class left Mon- 
day for Yazoo City to take the 
bar examination held there this 
week. 



Prep (on seeing notice on the 
bulletin board for M. I. 0. A. 
preliminary): “Gee! I have got! 

to get busy and learn me a speech 
right now.” 



Leon Hendricks of the Fresh- 
man class attended the Baptist 
Laymans Convention at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., last week, return- 1 
ing Saturday. 



The Forbes Piano Company 
gave a musical recital in the 
chapel Thursday night, much to 
the delight and pleasure of the 
students. 



We are very much pleased to 
say that the statement in last 
week ’s paper about Miss Louise j 
Taylor leaving us for Whitworth 
College is a mistake. 



Dr. Kern and Prof. Noble are 
planning a text book, the object 
of which is to instruct the ele- , 
mentary classes in English com- 
position and original production. 1 

Bro. W. B. Waldrop, pastor of 
the Galloway Memorial Church j 
of this city, was a pleasant visi- j 
tor at the home of Bro. Meggs 
last Friday evening. 

“Bilbo” Harrison, who it will 
be remembered was forced to 
leave school several weeks ago on j 
account of his health returned to 
school last Tuesday, much im- 
proved. 

Our boys made a raid on the | 
fair damsels of the town last Sat- 1 
urdav night and brought them 
out to the Lyceum entertainment. 
That’s the spirit boys, let the 
good work go on. 



Why didn’t Savage lecture to 
the psychology class last week ? 
That’s what some of the psychol- 
ogy students who had not prepar- 
ed their lesson want to know. 



Well, didn't that team do it to 
Canton. Let’s beat Mississippi 
College next week then we will j 
have an equal claim with A. & 
M. for the State championship. 



The preps got busy last week 
and scraped off their base ball | 
diamond. From all reports they | 
are going to have an excellent 
team and Manager Holder is ar- 
ranging a fine schedule. 

The cool spell last week nipped j 
a good, many spring suits in the | 
bud. Had it not been for that 
i new suits and straw hats would 
have been in full blossom ere this 
time. 




OCIETY 

PINS & 

emblems! 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 



of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundry lo the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

end oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken 
nington’s big store 

Jackson. Miss. 



11 is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



Advertise in PURPLE AND WHITE. 



BOYS! Come and see the New 
Fall Styles in all leathers and 
toes. Can furnish you this Shoe 
in tan, gun metal and patent, 
button or lace. 

Agency for Hanan & Sons, 
Howard & Foster Shoes. 



TATOM SHOE CO. 

415 East Capitol St. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

Undivided Profits, net 43.S32.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability. Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders. S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green. Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 







Cftc purple anD (KUhite 



7 



(Continued from page 1) Nichols, who had left the stage 

the auditorium was tilled to its g 0 ^- 0 f 0Wn pretending t hat he 
utmost capacity. was s j c j-. reappeared in the back 

The < ollegians were generally 0 f tbe auditorium, dressed as a 
enjoyed. Some parts of the pro- backwoodsman, and proceeded to 
gram were pretty punk, but some upbraijl-the players for not giv- 
were unusually good. For in- ing a better show . 

stance, Mr. Nichols made a hit The fourth attraction on the 
with his impersonations as did the Lyceum Course will be here some- 
quartette w itti its presentation of fj me soon and it is hoped that it 
the Skeleton Rag. A big surprise will attract ; ,s large a crowd as 
was given the audience when Mr. tb ; s one 



(Continued from page 3) 
being dispensed with the house 
; was thrown open for a free dis- 
cussion of the business of the so- 
ciety. The question of the Hen- 
drix College and Triangular de- 
bates was taken up and after due 
consideration it was decided to 
j postpone the election of these de- 
baters until the next meeting of 
the society. 

Each member was urged to re- 
i spond promptly with the “where- 
with-all” for the second term, 
and to bring out all those mem- 
bers that have become dilatory 
about attending society. 

The following officers were in- 
stalled for the third term : Scott, i 
President : Blewett. Vice-Presi- 

dent : Lusk. Secretary: Gathings, 
Treasurer. 

There being no further business I 
to come before the house the so- 
ciety adjourned. 



Lost, strayed or stolen, one 
brownish-yellow pony, named 
“Jack,” well broken. Any in- 
formation leading to his recovery 
will be rewarded and will keep 
me from “busting.” C. Regan. 



Big F 


rest) Stock of 




\\ 

HUDNUT’S 

§ 

COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 

PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building : Rooms without bath, 
One Dollar per day and Upw rds 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and j 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath. One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath, Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON MISSISSIPPI 



Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 



R. E. HARLAND 

Proprietor 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 
DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 

JACKSON, MISS. 



The Great Southern Hotel 



GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 



GOLF 




BATHING 


TENNIS 


EUROPEAN 


HUNTING 


FISHING 


PLAN 


250 ROOMS 



WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, ..... Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDNN & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 



8 



Cbc Purple ano €<31me 




Say fellows, Mississippi College 
is coming over soon to tie up with 
our hoys in a basket hall conflict. 
Let’s get their scalp. The team 
will do its part if we will only 
do ours. So, let’s get ’em all. 



CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

To buy your Fall Suit. 
Let us have your meas- 
ure. We sell 

KAHN TAILORED CLOTHES 

the Greatest yet. 

College Boys Always 
Welcome at our Place. 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 




R. C'. Edwards filled B. F. Fos- 
ter’s appointment at the Old La- 
dies Home last Friday evening. 
He was aided in the service by 
Bro. J. W. Cavett. Superintend- 
ent of Sunday School of the First 
Methodist Church. 

Dr. Watkins made an excellent 
address before the down town Y. 
M. C. A. last Sunday afternoon on 
“The Business of Life.’’ He also 
addressed the Belhaven students 
Sunday night. Large crowds 
were interesting listeners at both 
lectures. 

“Do you really think that your sis- 
ter is making such a match with the 
baron?” 

“Judging by the great number of 
anonymous letters addressed to her, 
1 should say so!” — Fliegende Blaet- 
ter (Munish.) 

With Many Items. — “Did you hire 
that plumber I recommended to you?” 

“Yes.” 

“How did he turn out?” 

“Oh, he filled the bill, all right.” — 
Boston Transcript. 



had 



big 



A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody & Co., Makers 



Simplicity.- — "Yes, we 
home wedding.” 

“You say it passed off smoothly?” 
"Yes; we hired a Broadway direc- 
tor. and he staged it just as if it had 
been a musical comedy.” — Louisville 
Courier- Journal. 



Rensselaer 



Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



Polytechnic 
Institute 



Engineering 
and Science 



Courses in Civil Engineering r C. E.\ Mechanical En- 
gineering lVLE.), Electrical Engineering it. Lj, aiul uy! nfi/tre 
General Science <B. S •. Also Special Courses. * M M > 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For cata'ogtje and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of gmdi«'i*es and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



ROBB & CONANT 
Photographers 

Work of any description un- 1 
dertaken. and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 
Any time, any place. 

423 Vo East Capitol St. 
Jackson, Miss. 



§ BESTQpAL 
THAT'S 
MINED 



Yard Mill Street. 

Climb. Phone 530. 

D. E. MARTIN 

Dealer in 

Coal, Wood and Kindling’ 

We Solicit Your Business. 
Orders Promptly Filled. 



THE 

“ WHO -M ADE THEM - FOR - YOU ’’ 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



Right exercise makes you 



A STRONG ARM 

You need strength for daily work, 
strong and keeps you well. 

D. & M. ATHLETIC GOODS 

Foot Ball Pants, Jerseys, Shoes, Basket Balls, Tennis Goods, Boxing 
Gloves, Punching Bags, and all the other paraphernalia is here. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 




THE JACKSON SANATORIUM, Jackson, Miss. 

(Opposite the West Side of the Governor’s Mansion) 

A modern Hospital, thoroughly equipped, especially for Surgical 
Cases. Open to all the Doctors and every patient regardless of 
creed or religion. Homelike comforts. Annex for colored patients. 
GRADUATE NURSES FURNISHED THE PUBLIC ON APPLICATION. 









QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



VoL V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1913. 



No. 17 



BISHOP MURRAH AT HOME. 



After a Stay of Several Months in 
the Orient, He Has Returned to 
His Native Home. 



Bishop W. B. Murrah, who has 
been on missionary work in China, 
Japan and Corea for a period of 
several months, reached Jackson, 
his home, last Thursday after- 
noon. It is useless to say that 
everybody was glad to see him. It 
is equally useless to say that the 
bishop was glad to get back. His 




WANTS $50,000 BUILDING. 



Hon. J. R. Bingham Sees Blessing 
in Fire — Commendable Plan to 
Replace Founder’s Hall — Trus- 
tees Will Probably Meet Soon. 



CRACK OF BAT AND BALL SUPERSEDES BASKET BALL- 
MANY APPLICANTS FOR TEAM— COACH PEASTER ON 
THE JOB— NINE OF LAST YEAR’S VARSITY RE- 
TURN-RECRUITS PROMISING— SOME 
OF THE PROSPECTS. 



Much interest is being express- 
ed in what is to be done about the 
rebuilding of the dormitory. One 
of the most notable utterances 
heard along this line were the re- 
marks made recently by Hon. J. 
R. Bingham, a member of the 
With the crack of the bat, basket ball loses its charm and base- Board of Trustees who, according 



to the Jackson Daily News, dis- 
cussed the proposition as follows: 
“This calamity will prove to be 
a blessing if the Methodists of 
Mississippi are wise. The trustees 
should not think of repairing that 
dormitory. If they entertain such 
a thought, the hundred thousand 
and more Methodists in Missis- 



work in the Orient has been of i ball easily takes first place. Such will be the case from now on as 
such a strenuous nature that re- 1 there are about thirty boys out every afternoon trying to prove their 
taxation from it is bound to be ability to hold down a place on the ’Varsity. For every position on 
welcome to one who works with the team there are from three to six applicants, and the man that 
the energy that is characteristic makes a place will only make it by hard and constant practice, 
of Bishop Murrah. j For first base there are Qalloway, Gaddis, Jones and Rucker. 

The bishop’s coming was es- Galloway is a very fast man and has had several years’ experience 
pecially gratifying to all Millsaps in baseball. Gaddis is also a fast man and handles himself like an 
College students. In the hearts of ; old leaguer. Jones is not so fast, but he knows the game and is a 

these there will always linger a good hitter. Rucker seems to be rather new at the game but has j sippi should rise up and forbid, 

•love for him, because of the undy- 1 shown remarkable improvement and is going to shove someone for The College needs to erect a $50,- 
ing interest that he has in their the initial bag. 000 building on that magnificent 

welfare, and his historic connec- For second base there are Fant, Johnson, Hendrix, Baekstrom site facing State Street, 
tion with the institution. He will an< I Frazier. Fant has been showing up mighty good. He is quick, “Founder’s Hall was a good 
never be forgotten as the man who [ has a good arm and knows the game. Johnson covers the ground building, and the $20,000 due us 
steered her in the right paths in around second base with ease. He seems to have played the game for by the insurance companies will 
the days of her youth and placed ! several seasons. Baekstrom, Hendrix and Frazier are good players make it as good as new. But 
her on that highway of progress an d stand just as good a chance as anyone else. nothing less than a $50,000 build- 

on which she is now so safely and ! For third base there are C’ondrey, Murrah, O’Donald, McClure ing will now serve our need, and 
surely traveling. and More. Condrey is a fast man, has about the best arm of any J worthily represent us. Such a 

Bishop Murrah talks most inter- j man on the team, is well acquainted with the game and is a good in- J structure just now would be 

estingly of the great awakening fielder. Murrah is another man who possesses a great many qualifi- worth more to us than an addi- 
that is now taking place in China, cations. He played third part of last season. O’Donald, More and tional $100,000 to the endowment. 
That is the field in which he ap- McClure play snappy ball, and it is not going to be easy to make the j “Some- visitors recently went 
pears to be most interested. He place over them. out on the car to visit Millsaps 

says that the public school move- 1 So far there has been only two men out for shortstop. But these College. When they saw the build- 
ment is very pronounced. The two men seem to be made for that position. They are both active, ing facing State Street they said: 
Chinese are eager to introduce J cover all their territory and throw with great accuracy. They are “This cannot be Millsaps College.’ 
American methods in these j no other than Holloman and Russell. So they returned to the city, con- 

schools, and they welcome all Those trying for the outfield are Hathorn, Page, Boyd, W. B. fident that the building they saw 
Americans who go there with a j More, Cain, Jackson, Cooper and Brown. The coach will have a hard j was far too small for Millsaps Col- 



desire to help them. To those 
wishing to enter missionary work. 
Bishop Murrah recommends China 
as the greatest field of missionary 
activity. He substantiates what 
Dr. Reed told us sometime ago 
concerning this unique people. 

About the Japanese the bishop 



time picking the best men out of the above mentioned names as they lege. And they were right! 
are all just about equal and the best outfielders that ever tried out. j “Now is our opportunity to be- 
In the group are one or two of last year’s stars, but they will have! gin larger plans for a greater 
to hustle if they retain their places. Millsaps. To put that dormitory 

The pitching staff will consist of Harris, Ward, Condrey, Jones back like it was would be a great- 
and Brown. Ward, Condrey and Jones were the mainstays of last ; er calamity than the fire which 



year’s pitching staff. Harris and Brown are both new jnen of great 
promise and are expected to add much strength to the pitching staff, 
is not so optimistic. They are a j Millsaps is indeed fortunate in securing the services of Peaster 
shrewd, polished people, but they ; as coach and there is no doubt but that if he has the co-operation 
are indifferent to Christianity. an< l support of the school he will turn out a winning team. 

However, they make no open op- The prospects for a winning team are very bright and all fellows 
position to it. who have the least chance of making it are urged to come out and 

(Continued on page 2) help Coach Peaster in turning out such a team. 



damaged it. Because to do that 
would put a stumbling block in 
the path of progress.” 

Bishop W. B. Murrah, the presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees, re- 
turned recently from abroad and 
no doubt a meeting of the Board 
(Continued on page 2) 





2 



Cfje Purple anD TOite 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 



Olin Rav 

R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 



WEEMS A BENEDICT. 



Prominent Senior Will Not Face 
Graduation Alone. 



Many things of great import 
and consequence have happened 



that statement would be over- 
stepping the bounds of truth, for 
vague but well formed rumors to 
the effect that something note- 
worthy and startling might be ex- 
pected from the distinguished 
business manager of our annual 
had encircled the campus. 



FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary j 



Frank 
A. A. 



Kappa Sigma. 

Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

Kern Secretary 



Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary j 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary ! 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 



Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President [ 

S. L. Crockett Vice President j 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

H. F. Magee President 

W. E. Hobbs Vice-President . 

T. W. Harrison Secretary j 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 



Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble ....Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kifkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H B F L Magee n ..”;;;; 3uslness Managers 
HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

Clerk 



WANTS $50,000 BUILDING. 

(Continued from page 1) 

will be called soon to perfect 



Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton - Presidjat 

W. O. Brumfield .Vice-President 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 



plans for the replacing of the old 
dormitory. 

It is hoped that a majority of 
the other trustees will heartily en- 
dorse Mr. Bingham’s plan and 
Millsaps will soon have another 
magnificent, substantial building 



CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage .-. President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 



Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson’ Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 
Triangular Debaters. 

Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell .Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T . Weems . Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



in place of the old dormitory. 

BISHOP MURRAH AT HOME. . 

(Continued from page 1) 

Bishop Murrah expresses grati- 
fication at the situation in Korea. 
The Japanese are developing the 
country wonderfully along ma- 
terial lines. The people are very 
receptive to the gospel. 

It is generally hoped and especi- 
ally so at Millsaps, that Bishop 
Murrah will be in Mississippi now 
i permanently. Ever since his elec- 
tion to the bishopric, his work has 
| called him from home and, while 
( it is gratifying to everyone that 
he is honored with the foreign 
I work, they now want him for 
themselves awhile. It is also 
j hoped that the bishop will be a 
frequent visitor at the College 
j chapel and a familiar figure on the 
[ campus. 

If you are thinking of taking a 
business course, see J. B. Kirkland 
and get a scholarship at a much 
reduced price. 



to mark the stay of the class of 
’13 at Millsaps. Many unusual 
and singular events that happened j 
during their stay here will be re- 
membered, if not by others, at 
least by the members of that class. 
Many deeds that have brought ex- 
clamations of wonder and surprise 
from a watching public have been 
performed by the members of ’13. 
However, it can now be truthfully 
said that all of them have been 
surpassed. Things that before 
seemed surprising now fade into 
insignificance. The purport of all 
of which is the fact that a member 
of this class, feeling the necessity 
of aid and encouragement in pass- 
ing over the shoals of graduation, 
has taken unto himself a better 
half. 

It was none other than our old 
college chum, John Wesley 
| Weems, who perpetrated the 
| above chronicled surprise on, we 
started to say, an unsuspecting 
student body. But no; to make 



These rumors were started by 
the fact that on last Friday 
Weems stealthily approached 
Hobb’s Barber Shop and demand- 
ed a shave and hair-cut. Active 
gossips at once got on his trail 
and endeavored to find out the 
meaning thereof, but all in vain. 

Not until Weems himself 
phoned the glad news to friends 
on the campus did the full mean- 
ing of his preparations occur to 
tlie astonished minds of his fellow 
students. Then, indeed, did Dame 
Rumor fall back in a swoon, cry- 
ing out “the half had never yet 
been told.” 

The lady who has taken charge 
of our college mate for the rest 
of his life was a Miss Mangum, a 
most charming girl of Copiah 
County. The Purple and White 
adds its congratulations to those 
of the Senior class and the stu- 
dent body and extends to the new- 
ly-weds very best wishes for a 
long, happy and useful life. 



“GO!!” 

THAT’S THE SPIRIT OF BASE BALL 
and we keep Base Ball Goods, the kind that “go,” too — the 
D. & M. BASEBALL GOODS 

They are the best made and last longest — and cost less. Catalogs, 
Score Cards and Rule Books Free — ask about them. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Big F 


resh Stock of 


k 


HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



Ct)c Purple anD Mite 



3 



CREOLES IN CABLE’S SOPHOMORE PRELIMINARY 
NOVELS. CONTEST. 



For the benefit of the contest- Eight Speakers Chosen for Final 
ants for the Clark Essay Medal a Contest. 

list of references on the subject ] 

of the Creoles in the novels of Thirteen sophomores appeared 
George W. Cable is here given. before the faculty last Tuesday 
Cable— Old Creole Days, The evening to try for places in the 
Grandissimes, The Creoles of contest for the Seutter Oratory 
Louisiana, Strange True Stories of Medal. The contest 'was a spirit- 
Louisiana. Bonaventure. ed one as all the contestants were 

Pratt: Stories of Cable, Critic, 'veil prepared and delivered ex- 
34 :250. cellent orations. 

Baskerville : Southern Writers, This contest always creates a 
j 299. | great deal of interest as it is the 

Library of Southern Literature d rs t contest for which original 
under “Cable” (State Library). manuscripts are necessary. 

Howells: Heroines of Fiction, The eight who were chosen for 
11,234. the final contest were: Blewett, | 

Hale: George W. Cable’s New Broom. Case, Broomfield. Clark.] 
Orleans, Bookman. 13:136. Cassibry. Henry and Gathins. 

Hearn: Scenes of Cable’s Ro- ~ 

mances. Century, Nov., 1883. Barrie : The Grandissimes, 

Meader: Duelling in Old Creole Bookman, 7 :401. 

Days, Century, 74 :248. The contestants should also by j 

Harwood: New Orleans in Fic- all means consult Poole’s Index] 
tion, Critic, 47 :426. for 1882-1887 in the State Library 

Mabie : Outlook, Introduction to under the words “Cable” and 
“Posson Jone,” 87 :217. “Creole”; the list of references 

Baskerville : Chautauquan, 25 : that is given there is a valuable ] 
179; Academy, 53: 497. one. 




Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss. These machines are 
used on the highest grade of catalogue and book work. 




DIRECTORY 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214 / 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210| / 2 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 

The Jones Printing Company 

, DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 north State St. JACKSON. MISS. 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 




BON-T ON CAFE 

REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



t 



4 



€fre purple ano mbitt 



Cbe purple ano SQOlte 

- 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry .Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett. Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager j 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- , 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers — 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



bates right now. They should re- 
member the excellent record that 
Millsaps made last session and 
bend their energies toward keep- 
ing it up. 

It is a great source of mortifica- 
tion to all loyal Millsaps men that 
Hendrix College has for two con- 
secutive years put it over us in de- 
bate. We all want to win that de- 
bate this year. There is some talk 
of not having it, but this will not 
suit a great majority of our fel- 
lows. Nothing will satisfy ’them 
except the overwhelming defeat 
of Hendrix College. We there- 
fore urge the men who have been 
placed on this debate to get busy 
and ndt to let it fall through. 

Let us not forget the fact that 
oratory and debating are the 
strongholds of Millsaps. Let us 
get together on these debates and 
make this the greatest year that 
Millsaps has ever had in this field. 



WHAT ABOUT THE DEBATES? 



Our attention has recently 
been called to the fact that not 
one of our regular debates has 
been arranged. Not a question for 
any of the debates has been 
agreed upon. No date has been 
set for one. Apparently no one 
has the matter in charge. Cer- 
tainly no one is attending to it. 

Now, what is the matter with 
the mid-session debate? It should 
be at the middle of the session or 
just as near as possible to that 
date. Yet, so far as we have been 
able to learn, not a thing has been 
done toward getting a question or 
of arranging a date. Owing to 
the dullness of the season, right 
now would be an ideal time for 
such an event. Later on, when 
events begin to pile upon each 
other, it will attract hardly any 
attention at all. The purpose of 
the debate to a large extent was 
to have something in the middle 
of the session. Those who expect 
to participate in the debate, those 
upon whom the societies have con- 
ferred the honor of representing 
them, should bestir themselves 
and give us something along the 
debating line in the near future. 

Then, there is the triangular de- 
bate. What has been done about 
it ? If somebody doesn’t take hold 
of it and get in correspondence 
with Mississippi College and the 
A. & M. about a question it will 
soon be too late to do so. Those 
who are going to represent us 
ought to he working on their de- 



MR. BINGHAM’S PROPOSI- 
TION. 



It seems to us that Hon. J. R. 
Bingham has just about hit the 
nail on the head in discussing the 
dormitory proposition. Attention 
is called to his utterances on this 
subject printed elsewhere in this 
issue. 

Mr. Bingham is right in assert- 
ing that nothing less than a 
$50,000 building will now serve 
our needs and worthily represent 
us. This is true because of the 
fact that Millsaps today and in the 
future as she grows and expands 
will need more commodious ancf 
up-to-date buildings than she has 
had in the past. Then, too, Ave 
need buildings of Avhich we can 
be justly proud. As he suggested, 
people are disappointed at Mill- 
saps’ buildings. We must confess 
that we ourselves were disappoint- 
ed when first we saw them. While 
we have some buildings that are 
all we could ask for we have not 
enough of this type. This should 
not be. .Millsaps should be pro- 
Added Avith the very best of every- 
thing. Above all things else we 
should haArn a building facing 
North State Street that would 
stand out before the world a fit 
representative of all those quali- 
ties and attributes that in the past 
have made Millsaps, from a liter- 
ary standpoint’, the equal of any 
college in the South. 

Another point Mr. Bingham { 
brings out is that to put that dor- 
mitory back as it Avas would be a 






stumbling block in the path of 
progress. Again we endorse his 
statement. We venture the asser- 
tion that if the present oppor- 
tunity for bettering the building 
conditions of the College is not 
taken advantage of that it will, to 
say the least, be ten years before 
the proposition is again taken up. 
In other words, the opportunity 
Avill have been lost and the doors 
of progress closed for a consider- 
able length of time. We believe 
that the friends of Millsaps expect 
some improvements to be made 
and that they should not alloiv 
any such postponement to take 
place. 

Let’s make this a time to start 
a moA'ement for a greater Millsaps 
and let’s take the first step toward 
that much desired end by placing 
on Founder’s Hall site a building 
that will weather the storms and 
blasts of years to come and ever 
stand sentinel over the College 
grounds, marking the period that 
began one of the greatest move- 
ments in the history of our be- 
loved alma mater. 



ATHLETICS. 



New life is beginning to take 
hold of things on the athletic 
: field. Millsaps field is almost as 
I Avell populated every afternoon as 
a well developed ant hill on a 
warm day. The crack of bat and 
ball and the shouts of “I have it” 
fill the air as Coach Peasters’ 
squad of ball tossers vie Avith each 
other in an effort to land a berth 
on the team. 

Nothing could please us better. 
We would that every man in Col- 
lege Avould take it upon himself 
to spend two hours on the athletic 
field every afternoon. This would 
not only work for the betterment 
of his physical, mental and moral 
condition but would mean much 
towards bettering the conditions 
of athletics at Millsaps. Nothing 
could be of more inestimable value 
to our College than winning 
teams, that is, clean, manly teams 
that Avill win victories in an open, 
aboAm-board manner on the sheer 
merits of the players. 

This will not be possible until 
the students realize that their 
Avillingness to undergo the neces- 
sary training and practice is es- • 
sential to putting out a winning 
team. We must realize that we 
must train and train hard, that 
Millsaps must not be represented j 
by any team except a team that is ' 



trained as Avell as it is possible for 
i a team to be trained. 

Millsaps should by all means 
I send a well rounded track team 
to represent us at Aberdeen in 
May. Again, she should put out a 
baseball team that will win the 
right of playing A. & M. College 
on that day. This Avill be possible 
if the fellows awaken to their 
duty and the responsibility there- 
of and enter into these contests 
Avith a determination of succeed- 
ing if hard work and practice will 
do so. Otherwise, Ave may expect 
no more than we have gotten in 
the preceding years of our short 
athletic history. If the latter case 
is true we will have only ourselves 
to blame and instead of cussing 
the team we should ansAver the 
question as to why we as individ- 
uals have not done our part. 

Men, let’s get out and make this 
a banner year in athletics. Let’s 
send both a track and baseball 
' team to Aberdeen that Avill bring 
back the results. 



TRACK WORK BEGINS. 

Prospects for Coming Season — 
Manager Harmon Issues Call 
for Track Men. 

Simultaneously with the crack 
of ball and bat on the athletic field 
we hear the crunch of the cinders 
and the fall of the vaulting pole, 
all sure signs that spring is here. 
And this year more than any 
other, we want to both hear and 
see not only plenty of such prac- 
tice on the track but a few State 
records smashed. 

As a coach we have Coach 
Fletcher, who will long be remem- 
bered at Millsaps for turning out 
such a splendid basket ball team 
as the now closing season saw. 
But no matter how good a basket 
ball coach he is, he is a far better 
track man, holding at present the 
Southern Inter-collegiate record 
for the mile. He was also a star 
in the quarter and half-mile races. 
So in the coach we have a 
‘‘peach. ” 

As to material there are excel- 
lent prospects. Howe, the sprint- 
er who has represented us for two 
years, is back and will soon be up 
to his old form. HoAve is a mighty 
good man on the relay also. 

Kirkland is “right there” as 
usual. He took the State mile at 
Meridian in a beautiful race last 
year, and we are expecting him to 
duplicate that stunt this year. H« 
is a “hurdling thing,” too. 



Ci)g Purple anD GHftite 



5 



Ott Broomfield will be there 
with the goods on the half-mile. 
Ott captured second place in that 
event last year, which was mighty 
good for a first year man. 

“Big” Henry is also a splendid 
middle distance man. We are 
expecting great things of him this 
year. 

Bob Harmon, the pole-vault er, 
is expected to smash all records 
this year in this event. 

Kirkland, N. B. Harmon an'd 
others are going to do good work 
in the high jump. 

We want all new men to come 
out and practice regularly. Prac- 
tice will win. All with plenty of 
“beef” come out — we need you on 
the weights badly. All who could 
“beat everybody in any school” 
running, come out and get “on 
your marks.” All jumpers, hurd- 
lers or those wishing to learn 
those events come out every even- 
ing at 4 o’clock. If you can’t do 
anything, come out anyhow and 
hustle up the men who can. The 
practice will do you good, whether 
you win or lose. 

A dual meet with Mississippi 
College is planned early in the 
spring. Other trips are in view. 
Be sure to come out. 

N. B. H.. JR.. Manager. 

SCIENCE CLUB MEETS. 

An Excellent Program Presented 
Friday Evening. 

On Friday evening the Science 
Club held its monthly meeting in 
Science Hall. A very excellent 
program had been prepared by 
Professor Harrell, chairman of the 
program committee. The papers 
and authors were the following : 
“Botanical Evidence As to the 
Age of Ox-Bow Lakes,” by J. B. 
Honeycutt; “Some Remarkable 
Specimens of Ancient Glass,” by 
W. M. Cain; “Asphalt, a Mysteri- 
ous Material,” by Professor Har- 
rell. All the papers were interest- 
ing and instructive and especially 
so was the one by Professor Har- 
rell, since it threw much light on 
the economical uses of asphalt. 
Those present seem to have en- 
joyed the program very much and j 
those absent do not know what J 
they missed and will do well to 
make it a point to be present next 
time. 

Boys, have your Tailoring done 
at T. Ik Doxey’s, and save the 
special discount which he gives to 
college boys. 




Professor R. S. Ricketts Speaks on 
“a Rare Old Virtue.” 



The Association was especially 
fortunate in having as speaker 
Professor Robert S. Ricketts on 
last Friday night. Not only is the 
Y. M. C. A. glad to listen to any 
member of the College speak on 
questions of importance to college 
men, but it is an especial pleasure 
to hear our revered friend, the 
purity of whose life has ever been 
an inspiration to the students of 
Millsaps. We are proud of hav- 
ing such a man among us and 
only hope that we, as members of 
the Y. M. C. A., may be permitted 
to follow in his footsteps. 

Professor Ricketts had chosen 
as his subject, “A Rare Old Vir- 
tue.” He explained that the dis- 
cussion was on the virtue of “pa- 
tience.” a subject not usually 
popular when speaking to young 
people. He spoke of how patience 
meant to the young life a tiresome 
period of waiting, hungering and 
longing for those things in the fu- 
ture; how that the Biblical ex- 
ample of patience, namely Job, 
was not usually attractive to the 
But, on the other 



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youthful mind 
hand, the speaker said, such a sub- 
ject needs to be brought before 
the student mind. In the mad rush 
of the present time the only ideal 
held before the eyes of the stu- 
dent contains this spirit of haste, 
reinforced by an athletic sugges- 
tion or illustration that exhorts 
only to press forward in mad, im- 
petuous haste. 

The speaker read a few verses 
from the first chapter of Second 
Peter as follows: “Add to your 
faith, virtue : and to virtue, knowl- 
edge ; and to knowledge, temper- 
ance; and to temperance, pa- 
tience : and to patience, godliness ; 
and to godliness, brotherly kind- 
ness; and to brotherly kindness, 
charity.” It may be noticed that 
patience is here placed in the cen- 
ter of all these virtues, perhaps 
with some suggestion of the high 
central part of an arch supporting 
all the rest, or it may be of the 
center of an army on which all 
else depends. Then again, James 
was quoted where he said: “Let 
patience have her perfect work.” 
Here is a transformation. Peter 
tells us of a still patience, James 
of patience at work. Just here 
the speaker said that he did not 
know, but imagined, that James 
(Continued on page 9) 



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LOCALS. 



D. W. Howe attended the Pres- 
byterian Sunday School Conven- 
tion held in Memphis this week as 
a delegate from the First Presby- 
terian Church of this city. 



Dr. Sullivan and Waldo Moore 
have gone in “cahoot” in the 
Sophomore chemistry class. Moore 
keeps time while Dr. Sullivan lec- 

i tures the class. 



Cooper says he don’t know 
what a dilemma is but that it has 
two horns. 



Gee ! What a dull season for 
newspaper reporters and college 
students ! 



We wonder which of the pro- 
fessors had the best claim on the 
little dog that attended chapel ex- 
ercises Friday morning. He seem- 
ed to have a great love for the 
master of the Department of 
Chemistry. 



Prof. Burton’s praises of the 
boys that he took to the A. & M. 
on the basket ball trip is but 
another way of showing what a 
manly set of boys Millsaps can 
boast of. May her student body 
ever be composed of such noble 
characters ! 



We are glad to announce in this 
issue that one C. Regan has suc- 
ceeded in finding his lost property. 
It was found in the possession of 
one of the assistant professors of 
Latin, seemingly well pleased with 
its new master. 




Who was the co-ed that was so j 
cruel as to answer Jack Brewer j 
in these words after he had pour- 1 
ed out his very heart’s love to J 
her, “Really, Jack, dear, you 
can’t expect me to believe you 
when your very eyes are joking”? 



OCTET! 
PIN'S & 

EMBLEMS 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

1ACKS0N 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



Miss Lester (during a discus- 
sion of the theory of evolution in 
Sophomore English class) : “Dr. 
Kern, did he ever prove that a 
horse was formerly a rabbit”? 



Well, did you get a portrayal of 
your likeness in the form of a 
comic valentine last Thursdav? 



Some really amusing valentines 
were received by the shack boys 
Thursday morning, and these gen- 
tlemen had a great deal of fun at 
each other’s expense over these 
little missives. 



Invitations are being received 
on the campus for the approach- 
ing marriage of Miss Ellen Fon- 
derin to Rev. W. N. Thomas. The 
Purple and White joins their 
many friends in wishing them a 
long and happy union. 



Quite a number of our bovs and 



A large number of our students 
attended an entertainment given t 
by the B. Y. P. U. at the residence 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis on Gallatin 
Street Thursday evening. Games 
of hearts were participated in. and 
we feel assured that the hours 
spent with these hospitable people 
were very much enjoyed. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 

Jackson. Miss. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



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Jim McClure sent Saturday and 
Sunday with home folks at Fay- 
ette. Miss. 



The literary societies did not 
meet Friday night because there 
were no lights in their halls. 



Prof. Burton has supplied the 
baseball team with bats and indi- 
vidual bat bags. Now, boys, get 
busy and use them. 



We were all glad to have R. E. 



girls enjoyed a valentine * part} Selb - V back with us after Q uite an 
given by the ladies of the First ex t enc i e< 3 absence but sorry to 
Presbyterian Church on St. Val- record the death of his father > 
entine’s night. All report a de- whieh sad event occurred several 
lightful time. weeks ago. 



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Was it because Prof. E. Y. Bur- 
ton hardly ever smiles before his 
Freshman class or because his 
smiles a re so gentle and sweet 
that prompted the Freshman co-ed 
to say: “Oh, I had just rather see 
that man smile than to eat”? 



AUTHOR’S CLUB. 



The preliminary contest for the 
Freshman medal was not held last 
Tuesday but was postponed until 
next week. 



The members of the Authors’ 
Club enjoyed a lecture by Dr. A. 
A. Kern on last Wednesday even- 
ing at the home of Miss Stella 
McGehee. Dr. Kern discussed 
with the club the Creoles of Geo. 
W. Cable in a most interesting 
manner, and after this the young 
people enjoyed a most delightful 
social hour together. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

undivided Profits, net 43.S32.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Waxkins, 
C. A Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



Cbt purple anD USWt 



7 



There Is a Great Difference in 




V. Stefansson, the famous explorer, who 
has recently discovered a tribe of blond 
Esquimaux in the arctic regions of North- 
western Canada, says: 

" Tuxedo is mild , cool and sooth- 
ing-just the sort of tobacco I need. 
Tuxedo goes with me wherever I go." 




HENRY REUTERDAHL 



Henry Reuterdahl, famous naval artist 
and expert on naval construction, says : 

‘ * You’ve got to smoke while paint- 
ingout of doors in winter — it helps 
you to keep warm. And a pipeful 
of pure, mild Tuxedo tobacco makes 
one forget the cold, and the paint 
flows more freely.” 







GEO. RANDOLPH CHESTER 



George Randolph Chester, famous au- 
thor of the “Wallingford ” stories, says: 

“ Why shouldn't a man be will- 
ing to recotnmend a tobacco which 
gives as cool, sweet and satisfying 
a smoke as Tuxedo f ' ’ 






Tuxedo is the Mildest, Sweetest, Most 
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Second— No one but the makers of Tuxedo 
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the tobacco and every bit of unpleasantness and 
harshness is taken out. 



?/tfcxedo 

The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 

Tuxedo was born in 1904. Its first imitator 
appeared two years later. Since then a host of 
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A T o imitation is ever as good as the original. 
No amount of advertising, no amount of bluster 
and bluff, c:n ever make an imitation tobacco as 
good as Tuxedo. 

Until someone discovers the secrets of the 
Tuxedo process, T uxedo will remain without a rival. 
Those secreis are so carefully guarded that it is 
practically impossible for them to be discovered. 

The greatest men in America — businessmen, 
professional men, lawyers, doctors, ministers, actors, 
sportsmen, athletes, engineers and men in every walk 
of life, smoke Tuxedo and recommend it as the most 
enjoyable, most pleasant and most healthful smoke. 

If you are not a pipe smoker, you are denying 
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WILLIAM B. WATTS 



William B. Watts, for T1 years Chief of 
the Detective Bureau of Boston, and now 
head of the Watts Detective Agency, of 
Boston, says: 

‘ 'I find Tuxedo to be a brand that 
particularly suits my taste, and I 
will continue to use it in the future, 
as I have done in the past.” 




GEORGE F. SLOSSON 

George F. Slosson, world-famous billiard 
expert, says : 

“ The one fine, sweet, natural 
pipe tobacco on the market — that's 
Tuxedo. Never burns or biles.” 




J. N. MARC HAND 

J. N. Marchand, the illustrator, whose 
“Western Types" have made him fa- 
mous, says: 

“ Fill my pipe with Tuxedo and 
I’m content. You can't beat Tux- 
edo for mildness and purity.” 








8 



Cfte Purple anP SUfrite 



LAW NOTES. 



If you are looking for “one” 
on the lawyer, how about this? 

A prominent minstrel man was 
a very material witness in a case 
and the lawyer on the opposing 
side was anxious to break the 
force of his testimony. Hence the 
following : 

“Mr. O’Brien, you are in the 
minstrel business?” asked the 
lawyer. 

“Yes, sir,” replied O’Brien. 

“Is it not a fact that it is a 
rather low calling?” 

‘ ‘ It is, sir, but it is so much bet- 
ter than my father did that I am 
rather proud of myself.” 

“And what was your father’s 
profession ? ’ ’ 

“He was a lawyer, sir,” 
promptly replied the minstrel 
man. 



The sympathy of the class goes 
out to Messrs. J. E. and A. B. 
Johnson. They were- called home 
last Wednesday, because of the 
sudden death of their father at his 
home in Batesville. 



burning this truth was brought 
very concretely before the owners 
of the burning freight. Some of 
I our own class-mates hurried to the 
scene and many were the expres- 
j sions of sympathy and much hand- 
shaking was indulged in. It is 
said that two of the number came 
from without the city and that 
another was so imbued with sym- 
pathy that he went the entire 
length of Capitol Street comfort- 
ing and consoling the people. 

We are glad to see our friends 
who stood the examination re- 
cently begin to break into the 
courts. From Goodman we hear 
great things, too. 

Messrs. Adam, Scarbrough, 
Hillman and Long went to Gulf- 
port last Tuesday to take a shot 
at the bar- — exam. As yet we have 
had no report on the outcome but 
| are sure that it will be satisfac- 
] tory. 

DR. SULLIVAN ENTERTAINS. 

Delightful Entertainment Given 
Science Club. 



A. D. Taylor of Brandon has 
been forced to withdraw from the 
law class because of failing eye- 
sight. We regret losing him, but 
hope that the rest will completely 
restore his failing sight. 



Judge Williams’ court did not 
meet as usual last Monday, be- 
cause of an event of great signifi- 
cance in College affairs. Monday 
and Tuesday nights were dedicat- 
ed to Mississippi College and her 
basket ball team. 



Uneasy would fall the gown on 
the shoulders of Chief Justice 
White of the United States Su- 
preme Court if some of our num- 
ber were as earnest law students 
as they are ladies^ men. If they 
were, well, they would get his job, 
Constitution or no Constitution. 



Many a man fights “big game” 
right here in the capital of Missis- 
sippi without any spectacular trip 
to Africa. Some number of our 
noble class, for instance, have a 
bout with the “wolf” and a race 
from that most vicious of native 
fauna, the bill collector, every day 
of the week. 



Every cloud has its silver lining. 
On last Wednesday morning as 
the great I. C. freight depot, with 
its large store of freight, was 



One of the most delightful 
social events of the session oc- 
curred Saturday night, when Dr. 
Sullivan entertained the members 
of the Science Club. 

Dr. Sullivan and his family are 
always ideal hosts and especially 
did they prove themselves such on 
this occasion. 

Many interesting features were 
introduced to make the time fly 
quickly. A number of games of 
rook were enjoyed, after which 
Dr. Sullivan and his accomplished 
daughters rendered delightful 
music, Dr. Sullivan performing on 
a harp and mandolin, while his 
two daughters played on the piano 
and a violin. 

Delicious refreshments were 
served at a late hour, after which 
the guests took their departure, 
all declaring that they had had a 
most delightful evening. 

Among those present were Dr. 
and Mrs. Sullivan, the Misses 
Sullivan, and Messrs. Lester, 
Honeycutt, J. B. Cain. W. M. Cain, 
W. M. Willingham. Kirkland. 
Howe, Lampton and Bell. 



Hobbs gives good hair cuts for 
25c. Get him to do your work 
and save money and time. 

A cool head and nerves not 
easily excited — John Boyd. 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only hy the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 

% 



Che Purple anD Wbitt 



9 



(Y. M. C. A., continued from page 6) 
meant not only perfection in its 
own work, but the work of per- 
fecting all things. How many men 
have failed in the last moments 
of a great task by not having pa- 
tience to finish their work ! How 
many boys have failed in their 
college course for the same rea- 
son ! In short, patience is the 
quality that enables us to put the 
finishing touches on our work. 
The message of Paul to the He- 
brews : ‘ ‘ Let us run with patience 
the race that is set before us,” 
was also noticed. Here is a greater 
transformation. From a standing 
patience we come to one working, 
then here we find patience run- 
ning. Perhaps this is the hardest 
thing. It is not difficult to con- 
ceive of a person being patient 
while waiting or even at work pre- 
paring for the final race. Paul 
had in mind, no doubt, the 
Olympic games, where those rac- 
ing were forced even in the race 
itself to be patient, keeping their 
nerves quiet and allowing no part 
of the body to be used that was 
not absolutely necessary in run- 
ning this great race. The beauti- 
ful story of Ben Hur was men- 
tioned in which the story is given 
of a chariot race. When the oth- 
ers became excited and urged on 
their horses with whip and shout, 




THE GRUNEWALL) and ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath. 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds 
Rooms with bath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath, Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



j Ben Hur silently held the lines 
and guided the team. After all, 
the greatest patience is not in the 
time of waiting, nor in the long 
toiling period of preparation, but 
in the final contest, and he who 
can have patience in the great 
race of life is indeed worthy of 
the victory. 

Two noteworthy instances of 
patient endurance were noted. 
One was in Motley’s tribute to 
William of Orange. How this 
mighty, patient statesman bore on 
his shoulders the burden of a 
whole nation, and was so univer- 
sally loved that when he died the 
j little children cried in the streets. 

[ Another story was that of Na- 
poleon’s marshall, whom he had 
stationed at a certain point with 
instructions to hold it until Na- 
poleon had made one of those 
I moves for which he was famous. 
Time passed and the marshal was 
; wounded. A courier came from 
the emperor asking how long 
could the position be held. This 
leader first replied that it could 
be held one hour, then two hours, 
and finally, drawing his wounded 
body up erect, he said: ‘‘Tell the 
emperor that. I can hold this posi- 
tion as long as he wants me to 
do it.” 

In conclusion. Professor Rick- 
etts said that he chose to call pa- i 
tience rare because it does not fit 
in with our common ideals ; old 
because it has small place in our 
modern haste, and a virtue be- 
cause nothing contributes more to i 
true manhood and womanhood or 
is of more importance in the race | 
of life. 



PREP. RECEPTION. 

Preps Will Entertain Friends on 
Washington’s Birthday. 

Invitations are out announcing 
the annual reception of the Pre- 
paratory School to be given on 
February 22. The reception will i 
be given in the Y. M. C. A. hall. 
Washington’s birthday is the day 
on which the reception occurs an- j 
nually and a more appropriate 
time of the year could not be 
chosen for a patriotic reception j 
such as the Preps give. 

Elaborate arrangements are be- 
ing made for a most sumptuous af- 
fair with many special features of J 
entertainment, and those who are 
so fortunate as to receive an invi- j 
tation are anticipating a most en- '• 
joyable evening. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 

The Only White Spot in Jackson 

ROYAL CAFE 

Special Dining Room for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

FRANK GLICK, Mgr. 



The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 
GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 ROOMS 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDON & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 




10 



Che Purple anD KHrite 




CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



FOR 

Something differ- 
ferent in Gent’s 
Furnishings,Hats, 
Caps and High 
Class Tailoring 
See 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 
Always Something New. 




A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody & Co., Makers 

Rensselaer 

Polytechnic 

amf’science IUSttfUle 

Course* In Civil Engineertnff/C. E.), Mechanical En- 
gineering i.M. E.). Electrical Engineering tE. Ej, and 
General Science OB. S. . Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical. Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of graduates and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOHN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



ROBB & CONANT 

Photographers 

Work of any description un- 
dertaken. and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 1 
exteriors. Any time, any place. I 

423*4 East Capitol St. 



PRENTISS SOCIETY. 

Two Extemporaneous Debates. 

The Prentiss Literary Society 
met in the Y. M. C. A. Hall Friday 
night and an interesting .session 
Jwas held. Instead of having the 
{ regular program, it was set aside 
and two extemporaneous debates 
were participated in. This proved 
to be an interesting venture, as 
many well brought forward argu- 
ments and prophesies were pro- 
duced on both questions. 

Prof. Noble also gave the so- 
ciety a stirring talk on society 
work, etc. The Prentiss boys, al- 
though hampered by the fire and 
forced to seek new quarters, are 
doing good work and many things 
are expected from them in the 
future. 



PREP. LOCALS. 



Paul Greenway left for his home 
at Ridgeland Friday. 

The annual Prep. School recep- 
tion is drawing near. Everyone 
is looking forward to this event as 
an evening of greatest enjoyment. 
The reception will be held on Feb- 
ruary 22 at 8 p. m. 

We wonder if “Crush” Perkins 
is as fond as ever of grated pine- j 
apple. 

The old baseball field, which the 
Preps will use for practice, is in 
fine condition and practice has J 
started. 



On the night of February 14th 
a number of students assembled 
at the home of the Misses Watkins 
to make merry the happy hours of 
St. Valentine’s Eve. 

After numerous games had been 
played and delicious refreshments 
served all present hid the charm- J 
ing hostess a happy good night, 
having enjoyed themselves to the 
fullest extent. 

F. WEST 

PRACTICAL 

MERCHANT 

TAILOR 

New Huber Bldg., over Bridge. 

New Phone 583 



Jackson, Miss. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



THE 

“WHO-MADE-THEM-FOR-YOU” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5,00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College [Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SC H LOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 
TRY THEM 







Vol. V. 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1913. 



No. 18 



MILLSAPS DEFEATS MISSISSIPPI COLLEGE 



BASEBALL PRACTICE. 



Week of Activity on Athletic 
Field. 



Baseball practice has been :n 
full swing during the past week. 
Upwards of thirty or forty can- 
didates have been out every af- 
ternoon competing for a position 
on the team. Coach Peaster has 
been keeping them busy, too. 
Both fielding and batting prac- 
tice have served to occupy the at- 
tention of the coach and players. 
The batting cage has been fixed 
up and is helping to enable the 
fellows to get the practice neces- j 
sary to get their eye on the ball 
and swat it. 



Competition is so great in most 
cases that nothing very definite 
concerning the exact personnel 
of the team has as yet been de- 
termined on. One thing is abso- 
lutely certain and that is that 
Millsaps will put the best team 
in the field that she has ever got- 
ten out. 






BASKET BALL BANQUET. 



Major Millsaps Gives Banquet to 
Basket Ball Team — Bountiful 
Supply of Food and Plenty of 
Toasts. 



The basket ball team this year 
has had remarkable success and 
deserves to the fullest, all the 
praises it has received. Millsaps - 
is justly proud of her team and 
everyone realizes that a large per 
cent of the credit is due to the 1 
efforts of Prof. E. Y. Burton and 
the efficient coaching of Mr. 
Flttcher. 

On last Friday evening this 
victorious team was elegantly en- 
tertained by Major Millsaps at a 
banquet at the Bon Ton Cafe. 
During the elaborate dinner, 
toasts were given, some of which 
(Continued on page 2) 



TIES A. & M. FOR STATE CHAMPIONSHIP IN BASKET BALL— 
MILLSAPS TEAM FINISHES SUCCESSFUL SEASON 
WITH SERIES OF VICTORIES— HARMON CHOSEN 
CAPTAIN FOR NEXT YEAR. 



There is joy in every heart at Millsaps College. Never before 
in the history of basket ball at this institution has such support been 
given to a team as was given last Monday and Tuesday nights. It 
was proved beyond any doubt that support is what it takes to make 
a team put forth every effort. - .... 

Notwithstanding the fact that we were playing one of the best 
teams in the state, the games were never in doubt. 

In the first game our boys took the lead from the toss-up and, 
in spite of all the other team could do, this lead was never overcome. 
Our boys showed themselves masters of every detail of the game 
and gave one of the prettiest exhibitions of passing and goal throw- 
ing that has ever been witnessed on any basket ball court. The work 
of every man on the team was worthy of being called star ball. 
Cook and Gaddis, our guards, are undoubtedly the best who have 
ever worked together in the City of Jackson. Their work far out- 
shone that of the two guards of the opposing team. Kirkland at 
center simply played rings around his man. From the first to the 
last, he showed that he was the master of the man from Clinton. 
He outjumped him and threw more goals. Frazier and Bob Har- 
mon. at forwards, played star ball. *Thev both were guarded by 
excellent men. but from the way these two youngsters played, it 
looked as if np guards could keep them from scoring. 

The second game was simply a repetition of the first. The 
Millsappers again outshone their opponents in every detail of the 
game. The score of the first game was twenty-four to fourteen, 
and that of the second, twenty-eight to fifteen. 

The Millsaps team won three out of four games from Mississippi 
College, thus showing that Mississippi College can have no claims 
to the state inter-Collegiate championship. This leaves a tie for the 
rag between A. & M. and Millsaps. 

After the close of the season the basket ball team met to choose 
their leader for next year. The boys, after some serious thinking 
on the subject decided that Bob Harmon was a man worthy of the 
honor. The captaincy of a basket ball team is not merely an honor 
but is also a great responsibility. A coach develops a team before j 
the beginning of the season and advises them through the season, 1 
but during the season the success of the team largely rests on the 
shoulders of the captain. If the team has confidence in the ability^ 
of their leader and knows that he will hold up his share of the game 
and that he will direct them rightly, they \yill in all probability 
prove a winning team. 

Bob Harmon has been on the team for two years and has played 
good steady ball. He is not what would be ^called a sensational j 
player, but always uses his head and comes up with his part of the ! 
game. He is every inch worthy of the honor of captaincy and is 
fully capable of taking care of the responsibilities of the situation. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



Cooper and Jones Win First Set. 

A very interesting tennis tour- 
, nament is now in progress at 
Millsaps. The first games of 
which were played Monday af- 
ternoon between Cooper and 
Jones and Lampton and McClure. 
The games were closely contested 
and resulted in a victory for 
J Cooper and Jones. The winners 
will play the winners of other 
sets and decide the champion- 
ship. The other players who 
have entered the tournament are 
Phillips and Moore. W. B.. Chris- 
ler, J. D. and R. M., and others 
whose names could not be secur- 
! ed at this time. 

Under the leadership of Prof. 
J. M. Burton, unusual interest is 
heing taken in tennis this year 
and the outcome of the tourna- 
j ment is anxiously awaited by the 
student body. Two college an- 
nuals will be given to the win- 
ners. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Prof. E. L. Bailey Delivers Excel- 
lent Address on Social Service. 



The association is to be con- 
gratulated on having as speaker 
on last Friday night Professor 
E. L. Bailey. The Y. M. C. A. at 
large, has derived great benefit 
from the outside speakers, who 
from time to tjrae, have endeavor- 
ed to present to the students of 
Millsaps College those duties and 
principles which must be adhered 
to in order for one to develop into 
that manhood for which our coun- 
try is now crying. Especially do 
we welcome and enjoy the pres- 
ence of one whom we know so 
well as we do Professor Bailey; 
one whom we know to be interest- 
ed in us. not only as a Y. M. C. 
A., but one who is watching our 
(Continued on page 2) 






2 



€tje Purple ano mWt 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon. Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurids Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble.: ...Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby „ ..Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett ....Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer [ 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Hannon Track Manager | 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

H. F. Magee President [ 

W. E. Hobbs Vice-President 

T. W. Harrison Secretary I 

Galloway. 

•S. B. Lampton President 

W. O. Brumfield Vice-Presidt nt 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alfprd Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin .. Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 



Olin Rav 
R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse-.Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder ... Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell. Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 



J . T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 



J. T. Weems.. 



(Chairman) 






H. B F L Magee n .:::::: Bu8il,P! ' s Managers 
HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 



BASKET BALL BANQUET 

(Continued from Page 1.) 

were as follows: 

“Major Millsaps,” by Jack 
Gaddis. 

“The Work of the Team.” by 
Captain Kirkland. 

“Next Year’s Team,” by Cap- 
tain-elect Harmon. 

“The Spirit of the Team,” by | 
Coach Fletcher. 

“The Character of the Team.” 



j one part of this short lesson was 
stressed more than another it 
was the seventh and eighth ver- 
ses which read as follows: “Ren- 
der therefore to all their dues; 
tribute to whom tribute is due ; 
custom to whom custom ; fear to 
whom fear; honour to whom hon- 
our. Owe no man anything, but 
to love one another; for he that 
loveth another hath fulfilled the 
law.” 

Here the speaker took a rapid 
review of the past two centuries. 
He said that every period of time, 
not necessarily one hundred 
years, was marked by some 
characteristic thought which was 
.peculiar to that age. Further, 
he said, that the philosophy of an 
age determine the civilization of j 
that age. Here we most heartily 
agree with the speaker. There- 1 
fore let us. as young men. prepare ! 
ourselves to go out into the world, | 
both intellectually and spiritual- 
ly, capable of grappling with the 
great problems of our time. May 
we take part in the furtherance of 
the dominant ideas of the twen- 
tieth century. 

Beginning with the fifteenth 
century the speaker briefly men- 
tioned some of the important dis- i 



coveries. He very ably discussed 
the characteristic thought of the 
people of that time. Then taking 
each century in succession up to 
the present he likewise discussed 
the leading events — industrial, 
political, and religious. The fif- 
teenth century, he said, was 
marked by the inquisition; the 
seventeenth by the Elizabethan 
age of literature ; the eighteenth 
by the French revolution and a 
great effort for political freedom ; 
the nineteenth by the industrial 
development. Lastly he mention- 
ed some of the movements of this 
century such as, “The Peace 
Movement,” and “The Men and 
Religious Movement.” The speak- 
er, in conclusion, said that every 
war waged was for some selfish 
purpose, and that these modem 
movements just mentioned in 
their final analysis meant nothing 
more than social service. 



AUTHORS’ CLUB. 



The Authors’ Club met at the 
home of Miss Birdie Grey Steen 
on last Wednesday evening. The 
members discussed Cable, and 
plans were made for a most in- 
teresting event in the near future. 



“GO!!” 

THAT’S THE SPIRIT OF BASE BALL 
and we keep Base Ball Goods, the kind that "go,” too — the 
I). & M. BASEBALL GOODS 

They are the best made and last longest — and cost less. Catalogs, 
Score Cards and Rule Books Free — ask about them. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



D. 


Junior. 

J. Savage 


President 


T. 


M. Cooper 


..Vice President 


I. 


W. Howe 


Serretarv 


H. 


L. Lassiter 


Treasurer 




SOPHOMORE. 


R. 


H. Harmon 


President 


K. 


M. Broom 


..Vice President 


C. 


Bullock 


Secretary 


G. 


W. Harrison 


Treasurer 




FRESHMAN. 


T. 


L. Carraway 


Presidnt 


J. 


N. McNeil 


.Vice President 


Miss Fannie Buck 


Secretary 




Law. 




T. 


L. Bailey 




J. 


A. Blount 


..Vice President 


i 


— . Dabney 


Secretary 


F. 


Thompson 


Treasurer 



MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrlx Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell -Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott -Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



by Prof. E. Y. Burton. 

“Coach Fletcher and Prof. E. 
| Y. Burton,” by N. Harmon. 

Those present were : Gaddis, 

j Frazier, Harmon, N. B. and R. H., 
Cook, Kirkland, Henry, Jones, 
Coach Fletcher and Prof. E. Y. 
1 Burton. 



Y. M. C. A. 

(Continued from page 1) 

progress in all of our affairs with 
I a great deal of concern. 

The speaker had selected as a 
stlbjeet, “Social Service.” All 
who have heard Professor Bailey 
speak, and those who are ac- 
quainted with the great work he 
is doing in the line of educational 
advance in this section, can, in 
some degree, imagine his ability 
to handle a subject like this. He 
read as a lesson a part of the 
thirteenth chapter of Romans. If 



Big F 


resh Stock of 


k 


HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

- QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



Cl )t purple anb TOitt 



3 



GALLOWAY SOCIETY. which event will occur sometime 

in April or May. 

Galloway’s Disapprove of Initia- Tatom delivered an excellent 
tive and Referendum. oration which was greatly enjov- 

' ed bv the soeietv. • 



DIRECTORY 



The Galloway’s held a very in- 
teresting meeting in the Galloway 
hall Friday night. The question 
for debate was, “Resolved, That 
Mississippi should adopt the Ini- 
tiative and Referendum.” Both 
sides were hotly contested and 
many interesting points were 
brought out. 

The speakers on the affirmative 
were Willingham and Barrett. 
Those on the negative : Brown 

and O’Donnell. The question 
was decided in favor of the nega- 
tive. 

The impromptu debate proved 
to be an interesting one and fur- 
nished much amusement for the 
society members and the visitors. 

As usual, quite a goodly num- 
ber of the coeds were present, all 
of whom were particularly wel- 
come to the meeting and whose 
presence added much enthusiasm 
to the speakers. 

Bullock was elected as presi- 
dent of the anniversary occasion 



PRENTISS SOCIETY. 



Prentiss Boys Would Turn Ly- 
ceum Course Over to Athletic 
Association. 



The Prentiss Society held its 
regular weekly meeting in the 
Y. M. C. A. hall last Friday night. 
Ruffin, the orator for the evening, 
delivered an excellent oration and 
Bending, the essayist, gave the 
society an essay of the very best 
I type. 

The question for debate on ac- 
count of its local interest proved 
to be a highly interesting one. It 
| was, “Resolved, That the Lyceum 
Course of Millsaps College should 
be in the hands of the Athletic 
Association. ’ ’ The affirmative 

was represented by Alford, Per- 
kins and Davis, and the negative 
by Pierman. Garroway and Mc- 
Kie. The question was decided 
in favor of the affirmative. 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING.' 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 






DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214/ 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210/z West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. F. P. WALKER * 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - • MISSISSIPPI. 


The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North Stile St. JACKSON. MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 

THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 


! ■ ■ - ■ 



BON-TON CAFE 

REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



Cfle purple anO TOit t 



JDI)£ Ji^UtplE anD COfjitC contest. Not only would this be ENGLISH BOOK PROPOSED — student 



misunderstand 



Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 



of inestimable benefit to the stu- 
dent who thus takes advantage 



MILLSAPS PROFESSORS unity of the two subjects and 

AUTHORS 

causes a waste of energy and a 

Dr. Kern and Prof. Noble Work- disorganization of class work. 



Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 0 f £hi s magnificent offer but it 
H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief would add more laurels to our 



Purple and White banner. 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



ing on Book to Help High 
- School English. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief would add more laurels to our ^ on g ook Help High 4. The securing of a large 

Mia's ^McGehee^ctaf Editor Pur P le and White banner ' - School English. number of small texts in litera- 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor ture, from time to time, is a con- 

53.' L.' LAMAR SOCIETY. Dr. Kern and Prof. Noble have stant source of annoyance to both 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor been sending out letters recently teacher and pupils. Furthermore, 

A *B ^Holder —Prep M School Editor Lamar’s Have Stirring Session — with the view of finding out the the variety of editions of a given 

j. B. Kirkland Business Manager McClure Declaims — Case advisability of writing a book that , classic that find their way into the 

s B Lamnton Asst Bus. Managers Orates. will correct the number of weak- hands of the pupils, proves a seri- 



J. .B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus.. Managers 
\V. W. Moore 



McClure Declaims — Case 
Orates. 



W. W. Moore nesses usually found in high | ous hindrance to effective teach- 

Matter intended for publication The Lamars held an old time school English. They have re- ing. 

should be addressed to the Editor-in- meet j n „ Fridav nieht when a ceived many responses from their j 5. The more recent texts on 

Chief, and must be in his hands be-. B ‘ .. > , ... , „ 

fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. [large and enthusiastic number of letters, not only asseiting tnat j practical composition do not fur- 

— . 7 " V 7 the soeietv members gathered to they had judged the situation cor- nigh enough recitation material. 

All business communications should • & j ., , ... . 

be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business hear an unusually ■ strong pro- rectiy and realized tne needs 01 Having made these criticisms, 

Manager. gram. President Scott called the the high school English coufse, | W e have asked ourselves if they 

Entered as second class matter, meeting to order after which the but that the books would be might not be met by properly pre- 

Jan. 2. 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- house was lead in prayer by the | adopted in the school which they pared texts. As a result, we have 



Matter intended for publication The Lamars held an old t 
should be addresp-d to the Editor-in- meet ing Fridav night when 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- ( & • s 

fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. [large and enthusiastic numbei 

~ 7 . „ , . . .7 . 7 . the soeietv members gathered 

All business communications should • & 



son. Miss., under act of Congress, h 1 ■ ctoii,.. 
March 3, 1879. cnapiain, neiov 



heard from. 



, planned a book for first year high 



- The first thing on the program This book) coming from the school English, which will consist 

Each ^ad du i on a^su b^scri d ti on 8 declamatl0n b - v J ' M ' Mc " pens of such men as Dr. Kern and 0 f a brief course in grammar and 

Extra copies to subscribers..".'”" .05 ( lure - ' vho rendered “Prentiss’ p ro f. \ 0 ble, will naturally be of composition and will be bound 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 first plea at the bar,” in a most the highest type and will no ; w ith at least three of the texts in 

on „ qpxroT ar^HTPS T 8dltable ma “ ner ‘ , C ‘ C \ Case doubt be a great success from the literature. Such a book may be 

THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS. th en came forward with an time the first copies come off the so ld for less than is ordinarily 

oration o an unusua ype— con- presg . and not 0 nly meaus muc h pa id for four small ones and can, 

A . J- 4- 1 ! l ... . „ „ , . _ X- 1 L cicl in rr nr o unm I itinn nt n n r \ m -1 3 



'oration of an unusual type — con- 



. • . a . a . r •/ I'uiu 101 xv ui omaii vuco anu cau, 

Our attention has recently been s, sting of a rendition of a conn- towards promotin g a higher stand- we believe, be so arranged as to 
called to the fact that Millsaps cal selection that aroused much ard for high school English but remedy all the defects mentioned 



has never had a student to win laughter among the audience. wil} help t0 keep the name of Mill- 1 above 
a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford. The question for debate, al- gaps before the hig h school stu-i n 
England, and so far as we know, though one that has been discuss- denfg of the g tate We publish , 



Our idea is to publish a begin- 
ner’s book in composition and lit- 



110 Millsaps student has ever ed on many occasions before. below a copy of the letter wh ich § “ composition and tit- 

competed for this honor. Al- ! proved an interesting one and the thev baye gent QUt ! erature that will teach the pupil 



though it would be useless for us I debaters showed that they were Dear Sir: 
to go into details as to the re- ''veil prepared for the event. From c 

quirements for the Rhodes Patterson and Lusk ably up- t eacb j ng , 

Scholarship, a few remarks held the affirmative side, while we h b 



our experience in the 



how to write. Formal rhetoric 
will have no place. The gap be- 
tween grammar and composition 



quirements tor tne ttnoties «nu auwi up- teaching of high school English ” “ D ~ ,7^ 

Scholarship, a few remarks held the affirmative side, while we h been impressed with sev . wdl be fiUed and ’ , at the same 

would not be -amiss: As we tin- Brown and Hillman were on the eral weaknesses in the course as P^tical use will be made of 



derstand it, Cecil Rhodes estab- j negative. The question was de- 
lished two scholarships to Ox- cided in favor of the affirmative. 



eral weaknesses in the course as ,, , .. „ 

I the selections from literature re- 
given at present. ■ . » ,, 

f mi 1 • 1 quired for college entrance. 

1. Ihe relation between gram- , , . 

. . . . ,. | We want to put our plan 

I mar and composition is not sut- , , , „ , , , 

P_ . . .. , , clearly before the teachers in or- 



ford. England, in each state of Professor Harrel was present and I and composition is 
the United States; each province made the society a most interest- 1 fl c i ent ] y indicated. The 



me ~ - — — — — ncientiy indicated. Tne average ,, ... „ , 

of Canada and Germany. These mg talk. Professor Harrel. while high g ; hool student . in the first d6r that ffe fi “ d out lf tbe 

scholarships pay the holder there- i m college-was an enthusiastic La- r t0Q often regar ds the two demand for . such a book ls reall y 
of $1500 annually a sum suffi- mar and his presence is always ; ubjecfs as distinct and does not a « great as it seems to us. We as- 

. . __ . • • . • ,,11 J enra vnn t n n t wo oho » ndWr wol 



cient in all respects to enable the an inspiration to the boys 



- - learn to applv the grammar he 1 .. . , 

student to reside at Oxford the A committee was appointed to has learned in the lower grades, in c ° me al W suggestions that may be 

greater portion of the time and get up a special program for next hjs gtudy of composition. °p , ^ 1 th ® P re P a y atl0n 

spend the remaining time in , Friday night. Some of the best 2 . The study of composition ° * le book ' Wl11 you kindly an- 

travel on the continent. members of the society will be has f reque ntly been theoretical swer Jhe questions on the enclosed 

Tli a sAtinlnreliina nyo nUtainoA 1 on the uroffrain then and the nub- ,1 1 . postal card and return it to us at 



sure you that we shall gladly wel- 



spend the remaining time in , Friday night. Some of the best 2 . The study of composition 
travel on the continent. , members of the society will be has f reqU ently been theoretical 



The scholarships are obtained [ on the program then and the pub- ,. ather than practicak The stll - P y ^ retUrD * 

by competitive examination and [ he is cordially invited to be pres- , lent studies composition rather l y earliest convenience T 



recognition of a man’s athletic ! oof- 
ability. j 



than practices it. He. learns the ; 



Very truly yours. 



One of the most interesting forms of discourse and the tech- ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M, 



M e know of no other arrange- th]kg heard in the college chapel meal terms of composition xvith- 
ment whereby a better opportu- thig year wag that one given the out learning how to write, 
mty is offered a student for ac- studentg rece ntlv by Bishop Mur- 3 ' The four-year high school 

J j.1 i? iL . r __ i * 1-1 /». 



Ph. D. (Johns-Uopkins), Pro- 
fessor of English, Millsaps Col- 
lege. 



quiring an education of the high- L ah The Millsaps students are course has consisted of two ' 

est type. Millsaps students ahva ys delighted to see their ex- parallel courses in composition b 1 L AK 1 GRA1SON NOBLE, 
should, by all means, be repre- pres j dent apd bope tbat be and literature with very little de- A. M. (Chicago), Headmaster 



sented among the holders of these come again within the near pendence of the one upon the 
scholarships. Her students hold j ^ ure [ other ; in some instances the two 

their own and excel in all other subjects have been taught in sep- 

competitive contests and it is Many of the boys attended the arate years. Shifting the atten- 

nothing but right that they play given at Belhaven Monday tion from composition to litera- 

should compete and win in this night. ture, and back again, leads the 



A. M. (Chicago), Headmaster 
and Professor of English, Mill- 
saps Preparatory School. 



tion from composition to lit era- John Phillips says hard work 

ture, and back again, leads the don’t hurt him none. 




Cfre Purple anD gjOftxtc 



5 




mra!"u*jrj!i*!A agsyap pj 



Webb Buie, Mrs. W. T. Joyce, 
Prof. R. S. Ricketts. Miss Bertha 
Ricketts, Prof. Noble and Miss 
Eloise Watkins. 



Quin, although a member of the 
team himself, has had so much 
experience under efficient coaches 
that he is thoroughly capable of 



part. A voting contest took place 
in which, after a hotly contested 
race, Miss Doris Holder was 
elected prettiest girl; James Rid- 



Manager Holder is arranging a 
good schedule and a successful 
season is predicted. 

(Continuad on page 6) 



PREP RECEPTION. 

Washington’s Birthday Appro- 
priately Celebrated. 

On Saturday evening, Feb. 23, 
the students of the Millsaps pre- 
paratory school entertained their 
friends at their annual reception. 
Since the brilliant social affair 
given by these young men last 
year, all have looked forward to 
this lovely celebration of Wash- 
ington’s birthday with pleasant 
anticipation, knowing the enjoy- 
ment awaiting them and on Sat- 
urday evening the expectation of 
the guests were more than real- 
ized. The building was artisti- 
cally decorated in the national 
red, white and blue, and through- 
out the evening a stringed band 
furnished delightful music. 

In the receiving line were : Dr. 
and Mrs. A. F. Watkins, Prof, and 



dell, handsomest man, and A. B. 
Holder, most popular. 

Delicious refreshments were 
served, consisting of punch, ice 
i cream and cake in patriotic col- 
ors. 

This reception was undoubtedly \ 
the most enjoyable affair of the 
year and one of which these 
young gentlemen may feel justly 
proud. 

PREP BASEBALL TEAM. 

Preps Hard at Work — Quin 
Coaches. 

The Preps have by no means 
been idle on the athletic field 
j during the last few weeks. They 
have not only been hard at work 
getting their baseball diamond in 
j shape, but under the direction of 
Coach Quin and Manager Holder, 
have been rounding the team into 



Games of different kinds were turning out a good team, well 
played, after which came the trained in all the fine points of 

frnonrl marnli in irltinli oil tnnlr hoeo Loll 



You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 

jy JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Remingtons 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 

Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



R. E. HARLAND 

Proprietor 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 
DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 

JACKSON, MISS. 



You are cordially invited to visit our -Repository and investigate the 
superior advantages to be had in our 

BUGGIES HORSE BLANKETS TEAM HARNESS 

SURRIES BUGGY WHIPS COLLARS, BRIDLES 

FARM WAGONS CARRIAGES LAP ROBES 



HORSE BLANKETS 
BUGGY WHIPS 
CARRIAGES 



BUGGY HARNESS SPRING WAGONS AND PLOW GEAR 

Oscar Lamb Sales Co. 

PHONE NO. 1082, REPOSITORY, 140 EAST CAPITOL STREET 
JACKSON, MISS. 






6 



Cfre Purple anD (Hablte 



__PREP BASEBALL TEAM. 

(Continued from page 5) 

Those who are trying out for 
various positions are : Catcher, 

Pierman, Green and Mansell ; first 
base. Holder and Pierman, W. S. ; 
second, Johnson and Quin; short, 
Waller and Green wav; third, 
Golding and Gates; pitchers, 
Fondren, Court and Wooten; out- 
fielders. Davis, Wheeler, Gates, 
Perkins. McGee and Ventress. 



LOCALS. 

Mr. J. M. Peoples, the efficient 
Tax Assessor, of Webster coun- 
ty, visited the Willingham boys 
Thursday and Friday of last 
week. Mr. Peoples is a former 
Millsaps student and feels a great 
interest in the future welfare of 
the college. 

Rev. S. L. Roberts of the 
Mississippi Conference, former 
student of this college, and 
now traveling in the interest of 
the new buildings to be erected 
at Whitworth next summer, con- 
ducted chapel exercises Monday 
morning. 



The Purple and White regrets 
that it is necessary to announce 
that the article in last week’s is- 
sue concerning the marriage of a 
member of the senior class has 
proven to be a mistake. 



Swepson F. Harkev, of last j 
year’s Sophomore class, came } 
down from his home at Tupelo, 
Miss., Saturday to be initiated in j 
the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 




The success of our basket ball 
t^im was all that anyone could 
ask for. What’s to keep the 
baseball season from proving just 
as successful. Lets do it. 



Rev. N. B. Harmon, of Yazoo 
City, came over to see our boys 
give Mississippi College a “drub- 
bing” in the basket ball game last 
week. He says he is proud of his 
“little Bobbie’s” record as a 
basket ball star. 

Eckford Summer, of Meridian, 
came over to be initiated into the 
Kappa Sigma fraternity Wednes- 
day of last week. “Ecky” says 
he is going to cast his lot with us 
again next year. 

Mr. T. D, Carroll, of Clay Coun- j 
ty, spent several days of last | 
week visiting friends and rela- 1 
fives on the campus. 



Misses Clingan, Parks, Reid 
and Knowles, were welcome 
guests of their Kappa Mu friends 
on the campus last Saturday. 



'OCIETY 
PINS & 

EMBLEMS 

WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



SAY BOYS! 

Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



W. C. (Fatty) McLean is very 
anxious to know why they are 
putting that pot up so high at the 
asylum. 



Mr. Sam Adams of Walthall, 
visited his cousin, “Duroc” Sav- 
age. last Friday and Saturday. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 

Jackson. Miss. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



Advertise In PURPLE AND WHITE. 



Prof. Burton (in French) : 
“Mr. Cassibry, will you read?” 
Mr. Cassibry: (Tragedy) 

“Grand Dieu, my hour has at last 
arrived. ’ ’ 



Prof. Harrel (in Physic class) : 
“Mr. McGee, what is a shadow?” 
McGee (after some hesitation) : 
“Nothing,” ’Fessor. 



’Taint no more goats at Missis- 
sippi College, our basket ball 
team and roofers got ’em. 

Geo. Harris returned last week 
from a few davs visit home. 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAYINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



t 



! EAT ACME BAKERY’S 



Y 

f 

J 

t 



WRAPPED BREAD 



* 

T 

Y 

x 

\ 

Y 

Y 

Y 



Made Clean, Baked Clean and Sold Clean. Wrapped in 
X Waxed Paper, absolutely germ proof and dust proof paper. | 

X X 

♦|» For something different in Gents’ Furnishings, Hats, Caps and £ 
| *!* 

I It Costs No More, 5c I 



X~X~X~X~X~X~X~X~X~X~X~X-X~X~X~X~X“X~X~X~X~X~X“X-X~X* 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. 



E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President 



AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 
W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 

..$200,000.00 



Capital Paid in 
Stockholders’ L 
Surplus Earned 



imes . 


* 





net 







100,000.00 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Wavkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



€fre purple anD mbite 



7 



BASKET BALL. 



Resume of Season’s Work. 

Millsaps has just ended a sea- 
son of unparelled success in bas- 
ket ball. The team disbanded on 
the night of the eighteenth with 
the brightest record ever held by 
a Millsaps team against foreign 
opponents. It is no little thing 
for a team to tie the redoubable 
A. & M. for the state champion- 
ship. And, as everyone knows, 
this is just what the Millsaps 
team has done. 

It is true that the first of the 
season was not a very successful 
period for the team, but the wind 
up that the team made may well 
blot out the unpleasant memories 
that the earlier defeats of the sea- 
son have caused. We pass over 
without mentioning the severe de- 
feat administered by Millsappers 
to the D’Lo boys, and call atten- 
tion to the tie up between our 
team and the A. & M. team on 
the latter ’s ground. Then there 
came the defeat which our team 
administered to the team of the 
Canton Athletes — a team in every 
respect fitted to play good ball. 
Last, but not least, was the de- 
feat of Mississippi College whose 
goat we got three times out of 
four, having defeated them once 
on their ground and twice on our 
own. 

When we review the personnel 
of our team it is not surprising 
that Millsaps has had a great sea- 
son in basket ball. Kirklkand at 
center would be a great asset to 
any team. He has long been 
recognized as one of the best ath- 
letes in school, and basket ball is 
not the least of his spheres. He 
is the best all round man on the 
team, being right there with thd 
goods on both offensive and de- 
fensive work. He is a hard play- 
er and uses his head at all parts 
of the game. 

It would be hard to find two 
better guards than Jack Gaddis 
and “Dr.” Cook. This is the: 
first year that either of them have , 
played college basket ball, but 
both of them have been playing 
like old timers. Their team work 
has been a feature of the season. 
They have been playing together 
in a remarkable fashion. Not 
only do they use the team work, j 
but they are both strong, muscu- 
lar fellows, capable of going up 
against and if necessary roughing 
it up with any Goliah that other 
teams might send against them. ; 



I 



, It is to be sincerely hoped that 
Cook and Gaddis both will be 
j back next year to add strength 
to our next season’s team. 

Bob Harmon and Swept Frazier 
have been doing some phenome- 
nal work as forwards. They are 
both experienced men and they 
know the game from beginning 
to end. Harmon has the record 
on long shots, while Frazier has 
been unusually successful in eas- 
ing them in over the other fellow 
and throwing foul goals. Har- 
mon has the reputation of being 
the gamest little fellow ever seen 
on the field, while Frazier’s giant 
form has always bluffed his oppo- 
nent. 

Coach Fletcher and Prof. E. Y. 
Burton deserve especial credit for 
| the team that was produced this 
year, Fletcher for doing the 
coaching and Prof. Burton for 
getting him to coach and for his 
i great interest in the team. 

Millsaps ought to get out a bet- 
J ter team next year than it did [ 
^ this. Kirkland is the only man j 
that will not be back next year. 
While it will be hard to find some- 
one to take his place and play it 
I as he has, yet we hope that just 
this thing can be accomplished. 

Here’s to a winning team fori 
next year. 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath, 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds 
Rooms with bath. Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 

The Only White Spot in Jackson 

ROYAL CAFE 

Special Dining Room for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

# 

FRANK GLICK, Mgr. 



The Great Southern Hotel 

GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI. 

THE MOST PALATIAL HOTEL ON THE GULF COAST 
GOLF BATHING 

TENNIS EUROPEAN HUNTING 

FISHING PLAN 250 ROOMS 

WEEKLY DANCES 
W. N. DRIVER, - - . • - - Manager 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDON & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 



Annex: Rooms wihout bath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with bath. Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

* New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 




8 



£be Purple anD MW e 




CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



FOR 

Something differ- 
ierent in Gent’s 
Furnisliings,Hats, 
Caps and High 
Class Tailoring 
See 

The Toggery- 

Royai Hotel Building. 
Always Something New. 




A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody & Co., Makers 



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Established 1824 

Troy, N. Y. 



Polytechnic 



and Science Institute 

Counes in Civil Engineering (C. E.>, Mechanical En- i 
gineenng i.M. E->. Electrical Engineering: (E. L.;. t&o 
General Science (R. S. ■. Also Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical. Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue and il'ustrated pamphlets show 1 — 
work of gradua'es and students and views of buildups 
and campus, apply to 

JOEZN W. NUGENT, Registrar. 



ROBB & CONANT 
Photographers 

Work of any description un- 
dertaken, and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 
exteriors. Any time, any place. 

423y 2 East Capitol St. 
Jackson, Miss. 



LOCALS 



Mr. Bell (reading* Chaucer) : 
“A fat swan loved he best of any 
roost (roast)” 

Mr. Savage. ‘‘Bell must think 
he ’s at the century instead of 
Canterbury.” 



Dr. Watkins, (on welcoming 
Bishop Murrah at the ehapel) : 
‘‘We are happy to welcome back 
to Millsaps this old familiar face 
and have it sit on the platform 
here with us.” 



Why are Prof. Lin and ‘‘Pea- 
nut Sam” not on friendly terms? 
Perhaps the junior eo-eds can 
throw some light on the subject. 



Russel: “Did you have a 

menu at the supper last night?” 



“Big” Henry: 
ters, too.” 



“Yes, and oys- 



“ Bilbo” Harrison returned to 
school Monday after a somewhat 
protracted period of absence, due 
to sickness. 



Why don’t the co-eds believe 
in the familiar little song, “Not 
because vour hair in curly.” 



Gee! Didn’t we get Mississippi 
College’s goat? I hope so. 



COMMENCEMENT 

INVITATIONS 

We are offering a great bargain 
in this line. 

Write for sample and price. 
State how many wanted. 

State if wanted all printed or 
part engraved. 

TUCKER 

PRINTING HOUSE 

JACKSON, MISS. 



W. F. WEST 

PRACTICAL 

MERCHANT 

TAILOR 

New Huber Bldg., over Bridge. 
New Phone 583 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



THE 

“WHO-MADE-THEM-FOR-YOU” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

. Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

m all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal” Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 

$6 and $6.50 j 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

5150 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 
TRY THEM 







QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 




Vol. V. 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1913. 


No. 19 



BASEBALL BN TIE BOOM 



Coach Peaster Making Good — 
Candidates for Team on 
the Job. 



Baseball, the most interesting 
and by far the broadest game in 
the world, is attracting the atten- 
tion of every fan in the United 
States. 

It is no less the case at Millsaps 
College. Every afternoon large 
crowds go out to the athletic field 
to encourage the boys in every way 
possible towards getting out a 
winning team, and by the way 
every man, who has put forth the 
least effort, has improved there is 
no doubt but that the team will 
play winning ball. 

Coach Peaster is fast rounding 
into shape a good team and it is 
remarkable how he watches each 
and every man so closely. He has 
long ago seen the weaknesses of all 
the men and shows wonderful pa- 
tience in coaching them. 

The pitchers, Ward and Harris, 
are showing up fine. They seem to 
be getting more speed every day, 
and as to their curves, why they 
- have got the stuff. 

Gaddis and Galloway on first j 
are “eating ’em up.” They cover 
their territory with ease and are 
playing star ball. 

Holloman and Murrah are play- 
ing all over and around second 
base. It is almost impossible to j 
knock one by them. 

In and around short stop is 
well filled by Brown. He handles 
the ball like "a ball of fire. Brown 
is a very clever player and the 
team expects great things from > 
him. 

On third is Jack Condrey. Jack 
is working out like an old leaguer, 
and after the season is over here 
it would not surprise us if he were 
asked to take the place of Baker 
of the Athletics. 

The outfied is being well taken 
care of by Jones, Jackson, Ha- 
thorn, Moore, Baxtrom and Page. 

(Continued on page 2) 



BOBASHELA NOW COMPLETED 



Material in Hands of Publishers — Staff Rests After 
Labors — Praises Due Staff and Dr. Kern. 



Too late! You have neglected the matter a little too long! These 
are the words that will fall upon your ears if you have not heeded the 
warnings of the annual staff and had your picture made or submitted 
your favorite poem or short story with the hope of getting it pub- 
lished. Yes, the work of the annual is closed and the material has 
not only been collected, but is now in the hands of the publishers, who 
are fast shaping it into its final form— the completed annual. 

The staff after several busy weeks are now very properly resting 
upon their laurels, proud in the fact that their task is accomplished 
and that they have rendered a lasting service to their alma mater. 
That is, the members of the staff who have had the care of the literary 
productions of the annual. The business managers are by no means 
so fortunate, as their work in the way of collecting levies and disposing 
of the annuals, is just beginning. 

Scott and his associates deserve unstinted praise for the work 
they have accomplished. The annual is going to be a beauty and will 
go down in the history of Millsaps as one of the best that has ever 
been produced here. 

As usual, Dr. Kern has had a great deal to do with the success 
of the work. He has overlooked the work and has had much to do 
with the promptness and spirit with which the members of the staff 
have worked. 

PROF. BURTON GOES TO ABERDEEN. 



Contracts Signed for Track Meet and Contests — Aber- 
deen People Enthused Over Coming Event. 



Prof. Burton made a trip to Aberdeen last week to perfect plans 
and draw up contracts for the oratorical contest, track meet and 
baseball games to be held there on May the ninth. 

Prof. Burton reports that the people of Aberdeen are very much 
enthused over the coming of the contests to that city and that they 
are making great preparations for entertaining the visitors on that 
day. 

The citizens of Aberdeen are under contract to guarantee six 
hundred dollars gate receipts at the track meet, and in addition they 
furnish grounds for ball game, track for track meet, opera house for 
speaking, a fifty dollar orator’s medal and fifty dollars worth of track 
medals. 

They are well fixed to entertain the contests, having an audito- 
rium that will seat twelve hundred people and an excellent place to 
hold the baseball and track contests. 

On the whole the event promises to be one of the most success- 
ful in the history of the association. Prof. Burton is arranging with 
the railroad company for a special train and a good rate is assured, 
thus enabling all the Millsaps boys to go and show the people in 
northern Mississippi that they are there to win. 



DORMITORY to be REBUILT 



Major Millsaps and Dr. Watkins 
Let Contract. 



Work has just begun on the re- 
building of the prep dormitory 
and ere long it will be replaced by 
a building equipped in most every 
way better than it was before the 
fire. 

At a recent meeting of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the board of 
trustees, Major Millsaps and Dr. 
Watkins were appointed as a 
building committee and they at 
once began to lay plans for an 
early completion of the work. 

Although some friends of Mill- 
saps had hoped that there would 
be some change in the building 
plans of the Millsaps building, it 
has seemed best to replace the 
dormitory along the same lines as 
it was before. 

Although the old structure will 
be used it will have a new appear- 



ance as another wall of brick will 
be added from the lowest founda- 
tion to the top. The inner wood 
work will be renewed and the 
building furnished and equipped 
in the best modern style. 



TKNNIS TOURNAMENT 
DELAYED. 



On account of the recent rainy 
weather the tennis tournament has 
been delayed, but it will be re- 
sumed again as soon as the tennis 
courts become dry enough. The 
tournament started off with some 
mighty good games and some 
equally as good ones are promised 
for the near future. Prof. Burton 
says they hope to get all the sets 
played off within the next two 
weeks. 



Hon. H. V. Watkins, came out to 
chapel last week to invite the boys 
to attend the demonstration meet- 
ing given to Senator Vardaman at 
the Century Thursday night. 




Ct)c Purple anO M3f) ftc 



V 




COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President 

Dr. E. Y. Burton..... Secretary 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz 1 Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis ....Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott..... Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern.—i Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 

Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage.....' President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby ! Secretary 

W. S. Burns ;....Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton,... Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon ....Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 

F. T. Scott President 

C. H. Clewett >.... .Vice-president 

Lusk Secretary 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton Preside at 

W. O. Brumfield Vice-President 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford -..Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt. Vice President 

F. H. McGee Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper.... ; Vice President 

I. W. Howe.... Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom ..Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary ] 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President j 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 
Triangular Debaters. 

■ Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell -Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems.. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

... — Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



Olin Ray 
R. I. Jolly 

-Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

--.Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett Anniversary Orator 

W. E. Morse.-Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

— Mid-Session Debaters 

j W. W. Moore 
| R. C. Edwards 

i — Commencement Debaters 

I N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson. .....Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

H. B F. L Magee n .’’Z Business Managers 
HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 



Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. H. M. King Speaks on 
Vision of God.” 



Of the many treats that have 
come to the members of the Asso- 
ciation, none was more enjoyed 
than the program of last Friday 
night, when the Rev. H. M. King, 
of the Baptist Church of the city, 
discussed ‘‘A Vision of God.” The 
speaker is one of the best in the 
city and is well known to the stu- 
dents of the college, being quite a 
young man himself. This was his 
first appearance at the Millsaps 
Y. M. C. A., but those who heard 
him on this occasion trust that we 
shall have the pleasure of hearing 
him again. 

The speaker read first the tenth 
chapter Of the Acts of the Apos- 
tles, with its story of the visions 
of PeV-ruand Cornelius, and called 
attention to the fact that for each 
of these visions there was a duty 
straightway to be performed. 
From this we readily come to the 
general proposition, namely: That 
for every vision there is a task, 
that for every glimpse into the 
world of imspiration there is en- 
joined the duty of carrying that 
glimpse to an unknowing world. 
Farther attention was called to the 
thought that God could give to 
every man a vision if he wished to 
do it; and that God wishes to re- 



veal himself to men if they "will 
only let him. <- 

The central thought of the dis- 
cussion was taken from the first 
verse of the first chapter of Eze- 
kiel: “As I was among the cap- 
tives by the river of Chebar, the 
heavens were opened and I saw 
visions of God.” Proceeding, the 
speaker said that the darkest hour 
in the history of a nation or an in- 
dividual, was when they had lost 
the power of vision. The dark- 
est hour in the history of Israel 
was this moment when Ezekiel be- 
comes aware that the people of 
Israel have lost their visions of 
eternal truth. But, the question 
comes to us, can God reveal him- 
self to us in this materialistic age 
in which we live? We can answer 
only by citing the workings of 
man’s hands such as the phono- 
graph which enables us to hear the 
tones of men who have been dead 
for ages past, or on the other hand 
the wireless telegraph system by 
which a man in mid-ocean can send 
messages to either shore. If the 
creations of imperfect man be of so 
great power, where shall we place 
the limit of the infinite power of 
man’s Creator? 

Only the men and women in the 
world who have had great visions, 
have done noble deeds in the world 
and have left a noble heritage to it. 
A vision is the ability to see, to 
see the possibilities that lie out in 
the great field of human endeavor. 
Columbus saw a vision of a wes- 
tern route to an eastern world and 
coupled with it the achievement 
necessary for success and gave to 
the fading flowers of European 
glory the dazzling grandeur of a 
new world. Edison saw a mighty 
vision and set the world throbbing 
with music. James Watts saw in 
the simple operation of the steam 
in the tea-kettle the possibilities of 
its latent power. Moody saw a 



j vision''of a lost world and of a re- 
| deeming Christ and so gave his life 
j with wonderful effect to the recon- 
ciliation of God and man. Moses 
was not able to help his people out 
of the land of Egypt until he had 
spent forty years in a strange land 
and there caught a vision of the 
mighty work which he must do. 
Paul turned his misdirected zeal 
from the persecution of the Christ- 
ians to a lifelong devotion to the 
cause of Christ only after he had 
| seen a mighty vision. 

One important point which time 
forbade to discuss fully was the 
voice that came with the vision and 
the bidding of man to his task. A 
beautiful story was told of the wo- 
man who, as she lay dying, said: 
“ Yea, though I walk through the 
valley of the shadow of death, I 
will fear no evil,” since she had 
caught a glimpse of the greater 
vision. 

The vision and the voice work 
together for the destruction of self. 
Shall it not be so in us. May we 
not answer the world’s call for 
men by laying aside self and yield- 
ing to the voice and vision that 
comes- to us, captives of sin by the 
river Chebar? 

! 

(Continued from page 1) 

All of these men are showing won- 
derful ability to play the outfield. 
They are fast, have splendid arms 
and know the game thoroughly. 

With the above mentioned ma- 
terial to choose from we are bound 
to get out a strong team. Some of 
the names rank among the best 
ball players in the state. 

Now just a gentle hint to the 
rooters. Millsaps has one of the 
best chances, or in fact, the only 
chance she has ever had to play 
for the state championship at the 
M. I. 0. A. meet. All she needs 
is your support in every way, for 
with this she is bound to win. 







Cfce purple anO TOite 



3 



LAMAR SOCIETY. 



Enthusiastic Meeting. 

There is no question but that 
the Lamar Society held its best 
meeting of this session, Friday 
night. President Scott being ab- 
sent, Vice-President C. H. Blewett 
presided over the meeting. In re- 
sponse to a request by the Presi- 
dent, the Secretary read the pro- 
gram whereby it was found that 
the Deelaimer and the Orator 
were absent. However, the time 
that might have been consumed by 
the Deelaimer and the Orator was 
very well used by the debaters. 

The question for discussion was : 
“Resolved, That the death penalty 
law should be abolished.” Not 
only is this a well balanced sub- 
ject, but it is a live subject; one 
that should not only be considered 
by a literary society alone, but by 
the people as a whole. 

The affirmative was upheld by 
Hobbs and Perry ; the negative by 
Honeycutt and Jas. McClure. All 
of the speakers were well prepared 
and the speeches that were deliver- 
ed by them will long be remem- 
bered. 

Judging from the enthusiasm 
shown by the members who were 
present, the Lamars have decided 
to make up for the time lost in the 
early part of the session. It is 
earnestly hoped that every mem- 
ber will attend regularly from 
now until the close of this session. 

The committee that was appoint- 
ed to arrange a special program 
has completed a most interesting 
program to be rendered tonight. 
The public is cordially invited to 
attend. The society hopes to give 
a clear demonstration of the good 
work it is doing. 

“Sister” Harris visited home 
folks at Vicksburg last week. 



GALLOWAYS HAVE 

AMUSING PROGRAM. 



Special Program Planned. 

The Galloways did not have 
their regular program Friday 
night, however an extemporaneous 
! debate furnished food for thought 
i and merriment to the members 
| who were present. 

The debate was on the question: 
“Resolved. That the horns of a 
cow are more useful than the 
tail.” It is not often that the 
Galloways allow their debaters to 
indulge in debating such a light 
and frivolous subject, but anyone 
[that heard the speakers on this 
(subject Friday night might easily 
ihave wondered why these usually 
(serious students didn’t turn come- 
jdian and go on the stage. The af- 
firmative was discussed by Melvin 
Johnson and Jean Morse while 
jVete Crockett and Silverstein 
I poured forth bombasts of argu- 
ment for the negative. 

Plans for a special program to- 
night were discussed and the pub- 
lic is guaranteed a most interest- 
ing meeting. All the members 
were requested to bring a lady 
out to the meeting. 

SPECIAL EXAMS. 



DIRECTORY 



The schedule for the special ex- 
aminations was posted this week 
and they will be held in the after- 
noons of the following dates: 

Dr. Sullivan — March 18. 

Dr. Swartz — March 19. 

Dr. Kern — March 20. 

Prof. E. Y. Burton — March 21. 

Prof. J. M. Burton — March 22. 

Prof. Harrel— March 24. 

Dr. Watkins — March 25. 

Prof. Lin — March 26. 

Paul Greenway went home Sat- 
urday. as usual. 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214 J/ 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210|/ 2 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 


The Jones Printing Company 

, DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON.' MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents' Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthaimology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 

Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 

301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 


MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 

i 



BON-TON CAFE 

REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
213 West Capitol Street Jackson 



Miss. 



€bt purple anD White 



Cbe Purple anD <KJI )ite 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Miilsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-inCMef 

F. T. Scott Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J, B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should be address°d to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o'clock on Saturday. 

All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
ran. 2. 1909, at the ,,-jstoffice at Jack 
son. Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



SUPPORT THE TEAMS. 

The number of candidates out 
trying for the baseball and track 
teams, although not as large as it 
might be, is good. The determin- 
ation with which these men are 
working for a place on the team 
shows that they have the proper 
spirit that will enable them to de- 
velop into a fast, snappy team. 

Coach Peaster is working the 
baseball boys hard, and in doing 
so deserves the commendation and 
support both of the players and 
the student body at large. He is. 
right in making them work for a 
place on the team and no man who 
is not willing to undergo the ne- 
cessary preliminary practice and 
training should be given a berth. 

This work has as its ultimate 
end the putting out of a team for 
Miilsaps that will be able, not only 
to hold its own with other teams, 
but to defeat them. We believe 
that Coach Peaster and the boys 
who are working for the team are 
going to do their part inwards 
this end. As to whether or not 
they succeed and the baseball and 
track teams are a success will be 
largely with the student body — 
their success depending on the 
loyalty and spirit with winch tl:e 
boys back the team with their en- 
couragement and financial back- 
ing 

There is no reason why this 
should not be ‘he banner year in 
athletics at Miilsaps. We started 
off well by tieing A. & M. for the 



i state championship in basket hall 
and if the fellows will hut support 
the baseball and track teams as 
they did the basket ball team, w e 
can put the purple and white ban- 
ner in the forefront in other con- 
tests also. Think it over, fellows, 
and lets do our part. 

CULTIVATE THE READING 
HABIT. 

We have heard it said by good | 
authorities that the man who did 
practically nothing during his col- 
lege career but learn to play on 
the football team and form the I 
reading habit, got more lasting 
benefit from his school life than 
one who clung tenaciously to the 
eternal grind of class-room rou- 
tine. While we are not in any I 
! way advocating the abolition of 
( the text -book, yet we cannot help ! 
but believe that there is a great ! 
deal of truth in the above state- 1 
ment. We believe that a man 
should take part in athletics be- > 
i cause the human mechanism de- j 
mands a certain amount of fresh 
air and exercise, and no man’s] 
mind can be properly developed j 
unless his body is developed pro- 1 
| portionately. In the same way, we j 
i believe that no matter how manv 

I 

text-books a man may have studied 
or how many ologies. or languages 
he may have mastered, his educa- 
tion is by no means complete un- 
less he has formed the reading j 
habit. 

No one will question the bene- 1 
! fits to be derived from the reading 
| habit. Stevenson tells us in his 
[ essays that he learned to write by 
j reading and imitating the style of 
I others. Shakespeare, Keats. Burns, 
and so on through the list of all 
the great writers, were pupils of 
the same school. Nothing is more 
developing or broadening to a ] 

, man ’s mind : nothing gives him a ! 
greater insight into the wonders 
and mysteries of nature ; nothing 
brings him into closer touch with 
his fellow-men and nothing will be 
of more genuine pleasure and es- 
sential value to a man in any pro- 
fession of life than the reading 
habit. 

Reading gives a man the essen- j 
tial note and the right word. 
Whether he is writing, making a 
big speech or engaged in con- 
versation/he is hampered unless he 
has broadened his mind and in- 
creased his vocabulary and store 
of knowledge by having read a cer- 
tain number of standard authors. 



Did you ever notice how some 
people seem to know everything ; 
seem to always have a good idea 
to advance on any subject ; how 
they always seem to have the pro- 
per word for the proper place as 
if legions of words swarmed to 
their call, and dozens of turns of 
phrases simultaneously bid for 
their choice? We are sure you 
have ; we meet these people every 
day. Next time you notice these 
qualities in a person, just find out 
if he is not a great reader. The 
odds are ten to one that your in- 
vestigation will prove that he is. 

But when should the reading 
habit be formed? We answer, as 
early as possible. By all means 
during the college career, for it is 
an accepted fact that not one man 
in a hundred forms the reading 
habit after he leaves school. 

We are indeed fortunate in 
having at our disposal one of the 
best libraries in the South. Thou- 
sands of books have been purchas- 
ed especially for us. They are 
ours to use at any and all seasons, 
and should be read until the cov- 
ers literally drop from their sides. 
Yet statistics show that the num- 
ber of books drawn out per capita 
by the students is exceedingly 
small and a number of our stu- 
dents never even think of entering 



the Library. What is the cause of 
this ? 

No doubt some will say that 
their studies take up all their time 
j and they have no time to read, 

] but this is worse than no excuse. 

, Generally, the man who tells you 
that he has no time for anything 
but his studies is one who spends 
j more time getting ready to do a 
thing than he spends in doing it. 
He spends as much time lighting 
j his pipe and gazing out of his win- 
dow as he does in preparing his 
] work. 

Tf you have not formed the read- 
ing habit, let us urge you to do so 
at once. Form the acquaintance 
of the masters of literature; be- 
come familiar with and learn to 
love and cherish the work of good 
authors ; make books your friends ; 
abide with them and you will find 
them not only a source of great 
pleasure and profit, but “a friend 
that sticketh closer than a broth- 
er.” 

We notice from the Union Uni- 
versity Cardinal and Cream, one 
of the best exchanges that comes to 
our desk, that the Union students 
granted their faculty a holiday 
on Washington’s birthday and had 
a grand parade over town, but 
that’s no sign the Millsappers are 
going to try it again. 



“GO!!” 

THAT’S THE SPIRIT OF BASE BALL 
and we keep Base Ball Goods, the kind that “go,” too — the 
I). & M. BASEBALL. GOODS 

They are the best made and last longest — and cost less. Catalogs, 
Score Cards and Rule Books Free — ask about them. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



Big Fresh Stock of 

HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 

The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 




Cl )c purple anD figfrite 



5 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE. 
Manager Boswell Gives Out Ten- 
tative Schedule. 

Although the baseball schedule 
has not yet been entirely com- 
pleted and some dates will proba- 
bly be changed, the Purple and 
White prints below a tentative 
schedule that will resemble the 
final schedule in most respects. 

Boswell has had quite a time 
with the schedule this season as he 
had one schedule practically com- 
pleted when the University of 
Mississippi and Howard College 
got out of the S. I. A. A. and ne- 
cessitated the making of new ar- 
rangements for four or five series. 
However, he hopes to have it com- 
pleted at a very early date and if 
his plans materialize it will be as 
follows : 

Millsaps Preps — 

Jackson League, March 21, 22. 

Mississippi College at Jackson, 
March 27, 28, 29. 

State Normal College at Jack- 
son, April 3, 4, 5. 

Union University at Jackson, 
Tenn., April 10, 11, 12. 

A. & M. at Starkville, April 15, 
16. 

A. & M. at Jackson, April 21. 

M. U. S. at Jackson, April 22, 
23, 24. 

Union University at Jackson, 
April 28, 29, 30. 

Mississippi College at Clinton, 
May 1, 2, 3. 

Probably Millsaps and A. & M. 
at Aberdeen, May 9. 

I. C. Enochs ’ll, of the eity, was 
on the campus one day last week. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 



\ Lamars Will Debate Interesting 
Question. 

The Lamar Literary Society has 
prepared a special program for 
next Friday night and cordially 
invites the public to be present, j 
Some of the best speakers of the J 
society will debate a real live I 
question and a hot time is expect- 
ed. The program is as follows: 

Declaimer — Hillman. 

Orator — H. H. Boswell. 

Debate — ‘ ‘ Resolved, That the 
powers should intervene in the 
Balkan war.” 

Affirmative — Olin Ray, J. R. 
Gathings, J. T. Weems. 

Negative — J. B. Kirkland, C. H. 
Blewett, F. H. McGee. 

SPECIAL EDITION MISS. COL- 
LEGE MAGAZINE. 

The editors of the Mississippi 
College Magazine have just issued 
at a cost of about $450, a special 
edition, known as the alumni edi- 
tion of their magazine. It is got- 
ten out in the interest of the en- 
dowment fund which they are de- 
sirous of raising. 

Congratulations are due them 
on the success of their work. The 
edition is one of which they may 
be justly proud. A short history 
of the college, portraits and 
sketches of the members of the 
faculty and buildings together 
with strong editorials, and numer- 
ous well written short stories and 
other articles of interest to college 
students, go to make up what is no 
doubt the best issue of the maga- 
zine that has ever been published. 



Z. D. DAVIS, President. 



AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 



R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 

Surplus Earned 

>noivided Profits, net 



...$200,000.00 
... 200,000.00 
._ 100,000.00 
_ 43.332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps. W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Wavkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



SPRING OPENING 



DON’T BUY A READY-MADE SUIT FOR 



EASTER 



Come in and select your own cloth and 
have one made to your measure for 



$15.00 



NOW IS THE TIME — Here are the smart styles in suits and top 
coats that you like. English models in two-button sack suits, smart 
Norfolks — the snappy things young men like. 

Our made-to-measure suits and top coats always give a man 
distinction and satisfaction. Call at once and inspect our complete 
line of Spring Suitings. It will be an easy matter to make your 
selection, and one that will please you. 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

IN INSTITUTION OF MANY YEARS STANDING. 

LEO E. COHN, Man* 

500 E. Capitol Street. Jackson, Mississippi. 



Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHERS 
The Quality of Our Goods is Right 



The Prices Will Please You 



WE SELL FOR CASH OR ON EASY PAYMENTS 
AT CASH PRICES 

SEE US FIRST 



TATOM SHOES 



Their supremacy is due 
to* a proper blending of 
correct style, good taste 
and absolute comfort. 

■ _ J 

Tatom Shoe Company 

MISSISSIPPI’S BIGGEST AND 
BEST SHOE STORE 

415 East Capitol Street 



Good Teachers Wanted 



We have on hand right now a dozen good places for teachers 
with proper qualifications — responsible places on good salaries. Let 
us show you to them. 

FREE REGISTRATION TO MILLSAPS STUDENTS. 

Southwestern Teachers’ Agency 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 









6 



Cbe Purple anD fiHfrite 



LAW NOTES. 



Secretary L. Bryan Dabney is 
at his home in Vicksburg for a 
few days. 



Very much to the pleasure of 
their friends and classmates 
Messrs. A. B. and J. E. Johnson 
are back at their work again. 



The judge threatens to go 
“goat” hunting pretty soon. 
Warn your friends. 

Special ! Extra ! ! The New 
Jersey girl who kicked the police- 
man in the face is going into vaud- 
eville. 

Scarborough has returned after 
a few days rest at his home in 
Woolmarket. 

The following frank and largely 
truthful return address appears on 
the envelopes of a West Virginia 
lawyer : 

Return in 3 days to 
James Knox Smith 
Lawyer and National Jail Robber 
Notary Public 
Keystone, West, Virginia. 

Judge Albert Hall Whitfield 
will preach to the class at his res- 
idence on Fortification street next 
Sunday at four o’clock. Let every 
member of the class come out and 
hear a real sermon. 

Much to the regret of his 
friends. Judge Harper is still in- 
disposed. It is hoped, however, 
that he will soon be able to return 
to Jackson. 

Captain Frank Johnston, as- 
sistant attorney general, will de- 
liver an address to the class at an 
early date. His address will deal 
largely with laws and lawmakers 
of Reconstruction times. 

This is a progressive age. Judge 
Featherstone got a new conception j 
of the word, “epigram,” the other] 



day when some descendant of Ham 
asked that his epigram be made as 
short as possible. The judge saw 
straightway that he was in the 
presence of a gentleman and 
scholar. Hence the following : 
“Epigram?” “Yas-sar, jedge, 
aint a epigram a short sentence 
about which we kin giv’ consider- 
able thinkin’?” He got thirty 
days. 

P. A. Roper, the efficient busi- 
ness manager of the Mississippi 
College Magazine, was on the cam- 
pus recently conferring with Prof. 
Burton about securing a special 
train to carry the Millsaps and 
Mississippi College boys to Aber- 
deen. They are working on the 
proposition and no doubt the two i 
schools will make the trip together i 
as usual. We are glad to go With 
Mississippi College, but here’s 
hoping they won’t be able to sing, 
“Pope Won,” again. 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 




EAT ACME BAKERY’S 
WRAPPED BREAD 

Made Clean, Baked Clean and Sold Clean. Wrapped in 
Waxed Paper, absolutely germ proof and dust proof paper. 
For something different in Gents’ Furnishings, Hats, Caps and 

It Costs No More, 5c* 










DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class'Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” comer Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

Only Place for Millsaps College Stationery, 
Penants, Pillows, Hats, 

Wirts Fountain Pens 

JOHN W. CHISOLM, Manager 



Z. D. Davis, President. W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. S. C. Hart, Cashier. 

CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Eer Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 




MONOTYPE MACHINE PLANT 



Of the Tucker Printing House, Jackson, Miss. These machines are 
used on the highest grade of catalogue and book work. 





C&e purple anD Mi tt 



Grand Opera Stars Choose TUXEDO 




LEO SLEZAK 



Leo Slezak, famous for his singing of the 
title role in “Otello,” says: 

1 1 Tuxedo means tobacco superior- 
ity. It easily holds first place in 
my opinion on account of its won- 
derful mildness arid fragrance .** 




PUTNAM GRISWOLD 



Putnam Griswold, known to all opera 
lovers as “Konig Marke "in “Tristan und 
Isolde”, says: 

**A smoke of Tuxedo adds zest 
to my work . / swear by it and 

endorse it above all other tobaccos. * * 




The favorite tobacco of 

the world’s best singers 

T HE world’s great singers, the bright stars of 
grand opera, men whose voices' are their 
fortunes, must have confidence in the 
tobacco they smoke, must choose a tobacco that is 
mild and fragrant, a tobacco that has no harmful 
effect on their throats. 

Leading singers at the Metropolitan Opera 
House during the current season — Leo Slezak, 
Karl Jorn, Dinh Gilly, Adamo Didur, Putnam Gris- 
wold, Herbert Witherspoon — find Tuxedo the one 
tobacco they can smoke with thorough enjoyment 
and absolute safety. 

Tuxedo cannot sting, bite, or irritate the delicate 
membranes of the mouth or throat. 




The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 



Skillfully treated under the famous “Tuxedo 
process,” Tuxedo burns slowly, and affords a cool, 
mild, pleasant smoke. 

Leading men in every walk of life testify to the 
soothing, energizing, helpful influence of Tuxedo. 
Business men find Tuxedo restful. Authors and 
journalists smoke it while they write. Doctors 
enjoy it and recommend it. Lawyers, ministers, 
and others, use it regularly. 

If you try Tuxedo for a month and cut out 
other smokes, you will find that you are getting 
the utmost satisfaction and enjoyment possible out 
of your smoking, and at the end of the month youi 
general health will have improved. 



YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 




KARL JORN 

Karl Jorn, who sings the role of “ The 
King’s Son” in “ Koenigskinder." says: 

“ Tuxedo is the ideal smoke in 
my opinion. If you find your 
energy sagging, try a pipeful of 
Tuxedo. It's a wonderful bracer. ’ ’ 




HERBERT WITHERSPOON 

Herbert Witherspoon, celebrated as “The 
King” in "Lohengrin.” says: 

“ Tuxedo is a good , wholesome 
tobacco with a mildness and fra- 
grance all its own. It adds many 
degrees to my pipe pleasure." 





ADAMO DIDUR 



Adamo Didur, f irnous bass, well-known 
as “Marcel'’ in “ The Huguenots.” says: 
"I’ve compared Tuxedo -with 
other tobaccos, much io the advan- 
tage of Tuxedo . It leads br a wide 
margin in purity and mildness." 





Convenient pouch, inner- 
lined with moisture-proof paper 



Famous green tin, with gold 
lettering, curved to fit pocket 



Illustrations 
are about one- 
half size of 
real packages. 







DINH GILLY 



Dinh Gilly, the famous "Tonio" in “ Pag- 
liacci,” says: 

‘ ‘ Pipe smoking gives added pleas- 
ure when the pipe is Hlled with 
Tuxedo. Tuxedo provides more 
keen enjoyment than any other to- 
bacco I know.” 




c? 



8 



Cbe Purple attO 03bite 



LOCALS. 



We regret to state that Jack 
Gaddis was forced to remain at 
home the first of the week on ac- 
count of illness. 



D. J. Savage, accompanied the 
preparatory basket hall team to 
Crystal Springs and Hazlehurst 
last week. 



J. N. Huntington, of last year’s 
sophomore class, and now a stu- 
dent at the Georgia School of 
Technology, visted “Jerry” Mont- 
gomery last week. 

Frank Sharborough of Mont- 
rose, Miss., spent Sunday with 
Waldo Moore. 



Weems says he can’t get the 
connection between geology and 
“ sully ologv. ” Perhaps he had 
better combine the two before the 
June examinations. 



Mrs. C. H. Alexander made the 
students a splendid talk at chapel 
exercises Wednesday morning in 
the interest of the working girls’ 
home in this citv. 



We are very glad to state at this 
writing that V. H. Sessions, one 
of our students who has been con- 
fined to his bed with smallpox, has 
recovered and has now gone to his 
home in Crystal Springs to spend 
a while prior to returning to col- 
lege. 

Ford Bufkin of Hazlehurst, for- 
mer Millsaps student, was here 
last week arranging to return to 
school next year. Ford is a good 
man and we gladly welcome him 
back to our ranks. 



Mr. A. S. Henry of Phoenix, 
visited his brother-in-law, R. E. 
Selby, last Saturday. 



Say, fellows, have you heard the 
stories of the King of Siam and 
the big ants, yet? 



Prof. Harrell (turning electri- 
cal machine) : “Now, this machine 
is being turned by a crank.” 



Prof. Lin (in Eco.) : “Mr. 

Morse, is the present condition a 
permanent or a temporary one?” 
Morse: “Permanent at present, 
I think, ’Fessor.” 



Dan Bufkin, “the human 
windmill,” is still on the campus, 
and occasionally starts a whirl- 
wind of talk that ends with the in- 
suring of some one of the boy’s 
life and more money in Dan’s 
pockets.. 



SCHOOL 

COMMENCEMENT 
j INVITATIONS 

Very pretty and at 
reasonable price 
Send for samples and 
prices 

TUCKER 

Printing House 

Jackson, Miss. 



“Biz” Clark is spending a few 
days with home people at Hatties- 
burg. He will return in a week or 
ten days to resume his work in 
school. 



Miss Steen (reflecting) : “I was 
born in the last part of the eigh- 
teenth century.” 

W. C. Mathis and Garroway, two 
alumni of the local order of Phi 
Delta, came -back Saturday night 
and were initiated into the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. 



Bob Montgomery of last year’s 
freshman class, visited friends on 
the campus several days the first 
part of the week. 



Dr. Watkins filled the pulpit at 
the Second Methodist Church last 
Sunday. As usual, he preached 
a masterly sermon which was en- 
joyed by a large congregation. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold by supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 




You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 

i 



vy JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Remingtons 





You are cordially invited to visit our Repository and investigate the 
superior advantages to be had in our 



BUGGIES 
SURRIES 
FARM WAGONS 
BUGGY HARNESS 



HORSE BLANKETS 
BUGGY WHIPS 
CARRIAGES 
SPRING WAGONS 



TEAM HARNESS 
COLLARS, BRIDLES 
LAP ROBES 
AND PLOW GEAR 



Oscar Lamb Sales Co. 



PHONE NO. 1082, REPOSITORY, 140 EAST CAPITOL STREET 
JACKSON, MISS. 






R. 


E. HARLAND 




. 

Proprietor 




PALACE BILLIARD HALL 


j DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC ; 




CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 
COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 




JACKSON, MISS. 






PREP LOCALS. 

— 

V The prep basket ball team de- 
feated the high school team last 
week. Hurrah for the preps. 

> 

J. C. Riddell has returned to 
school, greatly to the delight of 
his many friends. 



The prep basket ball boys went 
off on a trip last week but greatly 
to the consternation of the boys at 
home as well as themselves, they 
were unable to hang any scalps to 
their belt at Crystal Springs and 
Hazlehurst. 



PREPS DEFEAT HIGH 
SCHOOL. 



Whitson and Ely Star in Game 
Which Ends in 18-10 Vic- 
tory for Preps. 



The preps defeated the Jackson 
High School in a closely contested 
game of basket ball last week. The 
game was a good one all the way 
through, both sides making some 
spectacular plays and staying with 
the ball all the time. 

The Jackson boys numbered 
among their number some good 
athletes — fellows who are good in 
most any kind of athletic sports 




THE GRUNEWALD AND ANNEX 

NEW ORLEANS 

“Unquestionably the Best Kept Hotel 
in the South.” 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 

Main Building: Rooms without bath, 
One Dollar per day and Upw. rds 
Rooms with hath, Two Dollars and 
Half per day and Upwards. 

Annex: Rooms wihout hath, One 

Dollar and Half per day and Upwards. 
Rooms with hath, Three Dollars per 
day and Upwards. 

When two or more persons occupy 
the same room an extra charge of 
One Dollar per day per each extra 
person is made. 



Cfte Purple anD COjrite — 9 



• "■ 

and the preps were indeed fortu- 
nate in defeating them. 

The preps played in better form 
| than they have exhibited on any 
former occasion this . season dis- 
, playing good team work both in 
advancing the ball and defending 
their goals. 

The stars for the High School 
were Ball and Mosely, and those 
for the preps Whitson and Ely. 

The final score was 18-10 in fa- 
vor of the preps. 

The line-up was as follows: 

High School. Preps. 

Jones Ely 

Center 

Ball Willingham 

Forward 

McDowell Wheeler 

Forward 

Smith Whitson 

Guard 

Mosely Davis | 

Guard 

Time of Halves — 8 minutes. 
Goals — Wheeler 1, Whitson 2. 
Ely 2. Ball 3, McDowell 2. 


THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 


Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 




The Only White Spot in Jackson 

ROYAL CAFE 


Special Dining Room for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 

FRANK GLICK, Mgr. 


The baseball team looks like a 1 
sure winner and if some people 
don’t look out Millsans will not 
only play at the contest but will 
— you know. 

If you are awakened in the wee 
small hours of the night by hide- 
ous howls and noises do not be- 
come frightened. It’s only the 
freshmen training for the medal 
contest. 


FOR - THE - YOUNG - MAN 


“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s Clothing, rep- 
resenting the highest standard of wormanship and tailoring. 
We guarantee a perfect fit and the quality will please you. 
Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the City. 

COME TO SEE US. 


DOWNING- LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720. 

1 • 1 


1 1 

(tnuurimruniT 


COMMENCEMENT 




INVITATIONS 

We are offering a great bargain 
in this line. 

Write for sample and price. 
State how many wanted. 

State if wanted all printed or 
part engraved. 

TUCKER 

PRINTING HOUSE 

JACKSON, MISS. 


J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDON & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 

1 


W. F. WEST 

PRACTICAL 

MERCHANT 

TAILOR 

New Huber Bldg., over Bridge. 
New Phone 583 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




LISTEN! SOMETHING NEW! 

Come and See 

New! MILLSAPS COLLEGE Stationery 
Pennants — Main Building Reproduced. 

New Lot Fountain Pens. 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY, John W. Chisolm, Manager 



10 




CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



FOR 

Something differ- 
1 erent in Gent’s 
Furnishings, Hats, 
Caps and High 
Class Tailoring 
See 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 
Always Something New. 




A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody Sc Co., Makers 



Rensselaer 
Polytechnic | 

Engineering flicfiflltg> 

and Science illallllllC 

Courses in Civil Engineering fC. E.\ Mechanical En- u 
gineenng (M. E.), Electrical Engineering <E. and 
Genera! Science (E. £ A!so Special Courses. 

Unsurpassed new Chemical, Physical, Electrical, Me- 
chanical and Materials Testing Laboratories. 

For catalogue end illustrated pamphlets showing 
work of gmdua"'s and students and views of buildings 
and campus, apply to 

JOSN W. NUGENT. Registrar. 



ROBB & CONANT 
Photographers 

Work of any description un- 
dertaken, and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 
exteriors. Any time, any place. 

423i/i> East Capitol St. 
Jackson, Miss. 



C be purple anti mbite 



SPECIAL PROGRAM. 



Galloway’s Will Hold Extraordi- 
nary Session — College 
Orchestra to Play. 



The Galloways are planning a 
big time for tonight. Owing to 
lack of interest in society work 
lately they have decided to get up 
a special program just to show 
their members and the public in 
general what they are capable of 
doing. 

Some of the very best speakers 
of the society will turn loose their 
eloquence and logic in the society 
hall tonight. In addition to this 
and by way of a very special at- 
traction the college orchestra will 
be present and will help to pass 
the time away by dispensing sweet 
melody. 

Surely the event will be one 
which the most fastidious might 
enjoy. Everybody is cordially in- 
vited to be present. The program 
starts at eight o’clock sharp. 

The following is the program for 
the evening. 

Declaimer — Henry, R. T. 

Orator — Tatum, F. M. 

Debate — ‘ ‘ Resolved, That the 
present revolution in Mexico is 
justifiable. ’ ’ 

Affirmative — Crockett, Broom, 
Clark. 

Negative — Regan. Cain, Broom- 
field. • 

Extemporaneous Debate — Sub- 
ject to be announced. 

J. B. Cain left Wednesday for 
his home where he expects to re- 
cuperate from a slight illness. 
Here’s hoping he will soon he able 
to return. 



QCIETY 
PINS & 
EMBLEMS 




WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 



RICHARDSON 
JEWELRY CO. 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



THE 

“WHO-MADE-THEM-FOR-YOU” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap" Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal" Shoes 
the College Boys’ 



$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

l - ■ 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 

$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$ 1 . 50 , $ 1 . 75 , $2 

TRY THEM 









- 




QUA-E FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 




Voi. V. 




JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1913. 


No. 20 



SPECIAL MEETING 
TONIGHT 



VARSITY SWAMPS HIGH SCHOOL commencement 

hX Pj Ki y 



Lamars Will have Interesting Pro- 
gram — Public Invited. 

The Lamar Literary Society 
has prepared a special program for 
tonight and promises to give some- 
thing good to all who attend. The 
Millsaps orchestra has kindly con- 
sented to give the benefit of its 
music, and those who heard it at 
the Galloway meeting last Friday 
night know that this in itself will 
be a treat worth coming for. 

The best speakers and debaters 
in the society have been placed on 
the program. All of above have 
proven their ability on previous 
occasions. 

The Lamars are expecting this 
to be the best meeting of the year 
and everyone is cordially invited 
to come and bring a friend. 

The following is the program for 
the evening: 

Declaimer — Hillman. 

Orator — Boswell. 

Debate: “Resolved, That the 
powers should intervene in the 
Balkan war.” 

Affirmative — Olin Ray, J. R. 
Gathings, J. T. Weems. 

Negative — J. B. Kirkland, C. H. 
Blewett, F. H. McGee. 

GALLOWAY SOCIETY. 



Galloways Have Big Night — 
Special Program a Success — Or- 
chestra Adds Much to Evening’s 
Enjoyment. 



The friends of the Galloway 
Literary Society were given a real 
treat last Friday night where they 
gathered in the college chapel to 
enjoy the special program gotten 
up by the Galloways to show the 
public the class of work which they 
are doing. The Galloways ably 
demonstrated to the large crowd 
that was present that they are able 
to conduct their society and carry 
out their programs in a strong and 
commendable manner. 

(Continued on page 2) 



Practice Game Played On Cold Day — Team Shows Up Well — Many 
Improvements Noted. 

Last Friday afternoon, there was a large crowd out to witness 
the first practice game of the year for the Varsity team. The game 
was full of ginger despite the fact that the evening was cold, and 
that there was a raw north wind blowing across the diamond. 

When the dust had cleared away at the close of the seventh 
inning it was discovered that the Varsity had run up a total score of 
17, while the High School had only 1. This score was made in the 
first inning, when Bernie Smith knocked a long fly, which was caught 
by the wind and carried over Jackson’s head. Before he could recover 
it, Smith had circled the bases for a home run. There was only one 
other hit made by the High School and this is credited to Otto 
Williams. 

The Millsappers hit Taylor freely, but not until the fourth inning 
were they able to circle the bases freely. The only run made up to 
this time was made on a homer, by Cassibry. 

However, in the fourth they manage to get three men on bases, 
then Jones, with his war club, swatted the ball for a homer. Cassibry 
followed him with a three bagger and before the slaughter could be 
stopped three more runs were made. In the fifth inning there was no 
scoring by either side. In the sixth, however, the fireworks broke 
loose, the team batted around, and only got out because they were 
tired running around the bases. They made a total of six runs, while 
in the seventh three more were made. This making up a total of 17 
runs: 

The Varsity this year is composed of a bunch of stars, and each 
one vied with the other in showing their brilliance, but they all worked 
together with dexterity and skill. It is conceded by all that Captain 
Cassibry will be the best catcher of college ball in the state. He has 
a cool head and will handle his men to* the best advantage. As for 
our pitchers, they are the best on the market. The cold weather did 
not permit an -exhibition of their steam and curves, but as it was, 
Harris struck out thirteen men out of eighteen that faced him, and 
allowed only two hits, while in two innings Ward struck out five and 
did not allow any hits. 

The infield is faster this year than ever before, t his being brought 
about by the introduction of two fast men there. Brown at short, 
and Murrah at second. 

Galloway at first looked good, he handled everything with ease 
and was in the game at all times. This makes the third year that he 
has held the keystone hag against all comers. 

At third base Condry showed up well, he handled the ball well 
and had his eye on the ball, when batting, securing a two bagger. 

The race for second base is a warm one between Holliman and 
Murrah. Both are good men. 

The outfield is good this year, two of the old regulars are out 
there, Jones and Jackson, while centerfield is being contested for by 
Hawthorne and Backstrom. Both of these men showed up well in 
the practice game, each securing the same amount of hits. 

Too much praise cannot be given to Coach Peaster, who has 
labored hard with the men. He has shown what a good coach can 
do with a bunch of raw material. Taking the team as a whole, Mill- 
saps is proud of it. They showed their ability to bunch hits and to 
work together. 

(Continued on page 3) 



Bishop Kilgo to Preach Com- 
mencement Sermon — Hon. G. T. 
Fitzhugh Delivers Address — 
Seniors to Participate in Im- 
pressive Ceremonies. 

Plans are being made for one of 
the biggest and best commence- 
ments in the history of Millsaps. 
The commencement sermon will 
be preached by Bishop John C. 
Kilgo at the college chapel on the 
morning of June the eighth. 
Bishop Kilgo is one of the most 
noted divines in the Methodist 
church and an orator and minister 
of great ability. 

On the morning of the ninth 
representatives of the senior class 
will contest for the senior oratori- 
cal medal, and announcements of 
the winners of other prizes will be 
made. 

The commencement address will 
be made on the morning of June 
the tenth by Hon. G. T. Fitzhugh, 
of Memphis, Tenn. Mr. Fitzhugh 
is an orator of well known ability 
and the student body are looking 
forward to a great treat in his ad- 
dress. As is known to most of the 
students he is the senior member 
of the firm of Fitzhugh and Briggs 
of Memphis, who have just recent- 
ly won the celebrated case of 
bishops of the Methodist Church 
against the trustees of Vanderbilt 
University. Mr. Fitzhugh is a 
brother of Mrs. Bishop Murrah. 
He also married one of Maj. Mill- 
saps daughters. These two facts 
make him of particular interest to 
Millsaps students. 

In addition to the above pro- 
grams the senior class is prepar- 
ing some exercises that will be of 
an appropriate character in bid- 
ding their alma mater farewell. 



The Thirteen Club held a very 
interesting meeting last Monday 
night. A volume of college poetry 
was discussed and greatly enjoyed 
by the members present. 





2 



Cfte Purple and Mite 



College Directory 



Olin Ray 

R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 
J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

COLLEGE FACULTY. ! Galloway Speakers. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins President j p w'roten Anniversarian 

Dr. E. Y. Burton Secretary g l Crockett Anniversary Orator 

Dr. A. A. Kern Librarian \y. p Morse..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President r Harmon 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer ^ Broom 

FRATERNITIES. 



Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N, F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 



Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 



S. B. Lampton Secretary j j p Spinks President 

Kappa Mu. j A. B. Holder Vice President 

Miss Mary Shurlds Secretary S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

Phi Zeta. J A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary j L. H. Gates Football Manager 

Preparatory School. I p - E - Whitson Track Manager 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master | W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce Matron} SCIENCE CLUB. 

v m P A H. H. Lester President 

n. J. Savage...'. .1 ! President | Lampton Vice President 

F. T. Scott Vice President • Magee secretary 

R. E. Selby Secretary 



W. S. Burns Treasurer 



PUBLICATIONS. 
Purple and White. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 1 



Bobashela. 

F . T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 



DR. J. M. SULLIVAN LEC- 
TURES ON “A VITAL 
FAITH.” 



F. T. Sc<m hlet . i . C .. ASS0Ciati0n i>resident J - B - Ki^^d-.-.^Business Manager 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager Q , 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager ?L' l, Business Managers 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager "• • - “unNnD rnilwrii 

N - F - Track Mana ^ er J. T. Weems N0 . R . C . OUN . C ! .Chairman 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. g. L . Crockett Clerk 

Lamar. ■ - 

F. T. Scott President 

C. H. Clewett Vice-president 

Lusk Secretary 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton Preside at 

W. O. Brumfield .Vice-President i 

J. B. Cain Secretary . ... . , , , 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer I he Association is to be congrat- 

Prentiss. ulated on the several excellent lec- 1 

C. W. Alford Vice President ( tures we have had this year trom i 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary J f] le prominent business men and 

L. H. Gates Treasurer , „ , 

CLASSES I educators ot our state. Promptly 

Senior. at seven o’clock on last Friday 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President '‘veiling quite a number ot the stu- 

F. H. McGee Secretary dents together with several visi- 

. , tors assembled in the 1 . M. C. A. 

Junior. [ 

D. J. Savage President Hall, for the regular weekly exer- 

9, ooper Vice Presi( J ent : cises. We were very fortunate in 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer having as speaker of the evening 

SOPHOMORE. a man who plays a strong and ac- 

K. M. Broom Vice President Lve part in the ^ . M. C. A. work 

C. Bullock Secretary of our college, and whose dailv 

G. W. Harrison Treasurer . ,. ... , ‘ i 

FRESHMAN walk among us together with his I 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt daily conversation with us, stand 

J. N. McNeil . ..... .Vice President out as a e i ear p r0 of of his eapabil- 

Law i lty and fitness to advise and direct 



T. L. Bailey President us concerning manv of the pro- i 

— . — . Dabney Secretary Mcms ot lit6 Dr. «J. M. Sullivan. 

F. Thompson Treasurer I)r. Sullivan had selected as his j 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 



Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
'R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 



subject, “A Vital Faith.” He 
read as a lesson some verses from 
the third chapter of Titus. If one 
part of this lesson was stressed 
more than another it was the third 
verse which reads as follows: “For 
we ourselves also were sometimes 



F. T. Scott ..Anniversary Orator ; foolish, disobedient, deceived, serv- 1 

J.T. Weems .Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters , , ,. .. ,, 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator , a,1< hating one another. 



J ing diverse lusts and pleasures, 
living in malice and envy, hateful, 



Here the speaker showed that 
j the right sort of pleasure and re- 
| creation is a thing to be sought 
for ; but he also made it clear that 
| no one should be a seeker of vain 
| pleasures. 

Then taking up the main sub- 
jest, “A Vital Faith,” he pointed 
| us to the high accomplishments 
j possible to him who possesses a 
strong faith in himself, in his fel- 
J lowman, and in God. He also 
showed us that faith is the key to 
| all high aspirations and noble am- 
| bitions ; that only by Ijaith in the 
| justice of their cause and the puri- 
ty of their purpose men are in- 
I spired to do noble deeds. Through 
| all this was woven the idea and 
the truth that faith without works 
is dead. Our cause may be a just 
one, our faitli may be a strong one, 
but unless we have works, unless 
we make an effort we shall not ac- 
complish. 



T~ 

(Continued from page 1) 

One of the most enjoyable treats 
of the evening was the delightful 
music furnished by the orchestra 
composed of college Boys and 
girls. Those furnishing the music 
were Miss Edmonds, pianist ; Her- 
bert, violinist ; . Perry, violinist ; 

Capps, cornet; Edmonds, — * — ; 

Watkins, mandolin. 

The program was a good one 
from start to finish and every one 
had prepared his part as carefully 
as he would have done for the an- 
niversary occasion. 

The first thing under the head 
of literary exercises was a decla- 
mation by R. T. Henry. Henry 
was well prepared for the event 
and declaimed in a most credita- 
ble and laudable manner. 

F. M. Tatoin was then called for 
as orator and rendered an oration 
which was entirely in keeping with 
the excellence of the rest of the 



In the end, it was made clear 
to everyone present that he who 
would accomplish in life must have 
a strong faith in his ability to ac- 
complish and must also put forth 
a strong effort toward accomplish- 
ing; that he who would be inspired 
to do noble deeds must have a 
strong faith in his cause; that he 
who would live a noble Christian 
life must have a strong faith in 
God and the cause of Christianity. 



program. 

The debate was pu an interest- 
ing subject that is occupying the 
attention of the world today. 

The subject was, ‘ ‘ Resolved, that 
the present revolution in Mexico 
is justifiable.” 

Messrs. Morse, Crockett and 
Broom were the advocates of the 
justification theory and showed 
that they had been keeping up 
with the events and were well pre- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



R. E. HARLAND 

Proprietor 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 
DEALER IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

COLD DRINKS A SPECIALTY 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Che purple and Wire 



pared to uphold their side. 

No less urgent were Broomfield, 
Harmon and Wroten in advocat- 
ing the claims of the negative side. 

An interesting impromptu de- 
bate was then eugaged in greatly 
to the amusement of the visitors 
present. 

The Lamars held no meeting 
Friday night but joined in in 
swelling the crowd that attended 
the Galloway celebration. 



Jerry Ryan, whom the old stu- 
dents remember as the winner of 
the two-mile race here in ’ll, is 
captain of the track team at Cen- 
tenary College. They are arrang- 
j ing for a track meet to be held in 
Shreveport, La., between the col- 
leges of Louisiana, Mississippi and 
Texas and Millsaps will probably 
be represented. 

Democracy reigns supreme over 
the land — and at Millsaps. 



DIRECTORY 



VARSITY SWAMPS HIGH SCHOOL 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



Millsaps — 



SCORE. 

AB. R. H. PO. A. E. J. H. S.— 



AB. R. H. PO. A. E. 



Jackson, r. f 3 2 1 0 0 0 Ball, c 2 0 0 9 1 1 

Brown, s. s 5 110 2 1 Herring, c. f 3 0 0 2 0 0 

Condrey, 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 Smith, s. s 3 1110 4 

Jones, 1. f. 4 2 1 0 0 0 Taylor, p 3 0 0 1 1 0 

Cassibry, c 5 3 3 17 1 1 Frisbie, lb 3 0 0 4 0 2 

Harris, p 3 0 0 1 0 0 Jones, 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 

Galloway, lb 3 2 0 3 0 0 Brady, 1. f 2 0 0 3 0 1 

Murrah, 2b 3 1 0 0 0 0 0. Williams, 3b 301112 

Hawthorne, c. f 3 1 2 0 0 0 F. Williams, r. f 2 0 0 0 0 0 

Ward, p 2 1 1 0 0 0 Hebron, r. f 1 0 0 0 0 0 

Backstrom, c. f 2 2 2 0 0 0 

Holliman, 2b 120000 



Total 39 17 13 21 3 2 1 Total 25 1 2 21 3 11 

SUMMARY. 

Innings played, 7. Score: Millsaps 17, Jackson High School 1. 
Home runs: Smith, Cassibry and Jones. Three base hits: Cassibry. 
Two base hits : Cassibry. Hits off Harris, 2 ; off Ward, 0 ; off Taylor, 
1 3. Base on balls : Off Harris. 2 ; off Taylor, 3. Hit by pitched ball : 
Jackson. Struck out : By Harris, 13 ; by Ward, 5 ; by Taylor, 7. 

Umpire: Fletcher. Time: 50 minutes. 

PREPS DEFEATED SATURDAY. 

Saturday afternoon Coach Peaster’s bunch engaged in a little 
practice game with the Preps. Coach Quin brought the Preps out 
with the determination of giving the Varsity a good game and the 
score indicates that they did so. The score was eight to five in favor 
of the Varsity. Errors were plentiful on both sides and a great deal 
of time was taken up by Coach Peaster telling the boys how they 
ought to do. The Preps showed up well and it is believed that Quiu 
will turn out a good team. 



Big Fresh Stock of 




HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 

PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 



The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE. 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 



DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 



T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214J4 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 



Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 



DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 



DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

210J4 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 

The Jones Printing Company 

• DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 



We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 

WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 

The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 
Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 

ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 



Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 



JACKSON, 



MISSISSIPPI. 



109 North State St. 



JACKSON, MISS. 



OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 
Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 
Century Building, Down Stairs 
Jackson, Miss. 



LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 



V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jackson, Miss. 
THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 

Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



MAGEE - HAWKINS COMPANY 

Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 
West Jackson Mississippi 



BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 






4 



Cbe l^ucple anD White 



Cfre Purple anD Mite 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Millsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 



H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott. .Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry Athletic Editor I 

G. H. Moore. Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor j 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 



S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 



dollar, he should be waited on by 
his fellow students. 

Mrs. Watkins has done a great 
service to the college in buying 
this piano for us and it is nothing 
but right and just that we should 
show our appreciation of her 
thoughtfulness by helping her in 
her efforts to pay for it. 

We feel confident that the stu- 
dents will respond nobly to any 
appeals that she may make to 
them in the future. 



Matter intended for publication 
should be addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



ON GENERAL CONDUCT 
ABOUT THE CAMPUS. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the joetoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 



One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



A WORTHY CAUSE. 



While we are not given to knock- 
ing, we must say that the response 
given to the appeal to the students 
to attend the entertainment for 
the piano fund was about as poor 
an exhibition of college spirit as 
we have ever seen. 

This lack of interest manifested 
on the part of the student body, 
we believe, could have come from 
only two sources: The one that 

the entertainment came on a 
school night when the students 
were busily engaged with their 
work; the other that the students 
neglected to go just through pure 
and unadulterated laziness. We 
hope that it was occasioned by the 
former. 

As we said before, these are the ] 
only reasons that we can deduce 
for this condition. It could not 
have been on account of the char- 
acter of the performance, for all 
who have ever heard these gifted 
people know that anything given 
under their supervision could be 
nothing short Of the best. 

It could not have been on ac- 
count of the cause, for we know of 
no more worthy cause for which 
a student might spend his money. 
Lastly, it surely was not on ac- 
count of the price of admission, for 
if there is a student in Millsaps 
College who is too close to part 
from twenty-five cents to promote 
a good cause and at the same time 
get the benefit of an entertainment 
that would ordinarily cost him a 



It is not our purpose to try to 
dictate what the conduct about the 
campus shall be, but it is the duty 
and the sphere of every good news- 
paper to attack the evils that exist 
in its community. We think that 
the students of this college are as 
orderly and gentlemanly as those 
of any college of which we have 
any knowledge, more so than those 
of a great many. But that some 
things, some objectionable things, 
things that could be omitted and 
not take any of the pleasure or 
benefit from the college life of 
those who do them, are done here 
no one will for an instant deny. 

One of the evils above mentioned 
is the habit of throwing peanut 
hulls on the walks of the campus 
and on the floors of the buildings. 
Now, we realize that peanuts are 
good. The delicious flavor ex- 
tracted from them is unparalled 
in its effects on the organs of taste. 
And we do not deny that the rich 
sustenance derived from them is 
welcomed by the too often lightly’ 
fed stomach. But we maintain 
that the privacy of one’s own j 
chamber is the proper place to 
masticate them. Besides being the 
proper place, an additional ad- 
vantage would be that you would 
not be liarrassed on every side by 
the familiar request, ‘Give me a 
peanut.” 

Another objectionable habit is a 
very old and a very much to be 
lamented one: that of cutting up 
the desks and writing on the walls. 
The objectionable qualities of these 
are too well known to need discus- 
sion. One special phase, however, 
we wish to call attention to, and 
that is the habit of writing gibes 
about the professors in public 
places. These do not hurt the pro- 
fessors, they are men of too large 
a caliber to take any notice of 
them, knowing the only source 
from which they come, but they do 



1 hurt the men who put them up 
there. They lower them, if not in 
their own estimation, certainly in 
! the estimation of all their right 
thinking fellows. 

We are here to better and build 
up ourselves, not to degenerate. It 
would be pitiable, indeed, if any 
of us should deteriorate into the 
tribe of mammels of canine dispo- 
sition. We don’t known what it 
indicates, but certainly it is almost 
impossible for any number of Mill- 
saps boy’s to gather together in 
chapel or anywhere else on the 
campus without there being some 
among them who insist on imita- 
ting the familiar sounds frequent- 
ly emitted by the animals above 
referred to. This is unfortunate 
in the extreme. It is especially 
embarrassing when we have visi- 
tors. It is also of some concern to 
us what our neighbors think about 
us. We suspect some of them are 
frequently’ disturbed from their 
peaceful slumbers as one can gen- 
erally hear these sounds at almost 
any time during the night. 

Now, fellows, lets cut these ob- 
jectionable things out, if not for 
ourselves, for the love we have for 
our college. 



.“A LENTEN RECITAL.” 



Mrs. Alfred Franklin Smith Gives 
Beautiful Recital to Millsaps 
College Boy’s and Their Friends. 



On Thursday night of the sixth, 
Mrs. Alfred Franklin Smith gave 
an exquisite recital to a Millsaps 
College audience in the college au- 
ditorium. Mrs. Smith had asso- 
ciated with her Mrs. Willis David 
Hannah, pianiste ; Mrs. Chess Bond 
Wymond, violiniste; Mr. Albert B. 
Philp, clarionetist. The audience 
thus, had four artists before them, 
and their talent and presence cap- 
tivated everyone present. 

Because of the thought lying 
back of this recital, the sentiment 
animating those interested and be- 
cause of the high grade of talent 
which made every number a joy 
and an inspiration, the whole even- 
ing was of unusual interest and 
charm, and the audience was simp- 
ly carried away with pleasure and 
enthusiasm. In arranging the pro- 
gram, which was called, “A Len- 
ton Recital,” the four-leaf clover 
was used as the emblem, and in the 
introductory talk which Mrs. 
Smith made to the students, she 
referred to this, and hoped that 
the musicians were bringing 



“luck.” She said, however, that 
“luck” might be found by all of 
them who were willing to work and 
study and sacrifice for its sake. 

Mrs. Smith had grouped her 
numbers in four ‘ ‘ Songs for the 
day,” three “Songs for Easter- 
tide,” and in the four “Songs of 
Pathos,” her own arrangement 
and interpretation of “The Rosa- 
ry” met with cordial apprecia- 
tion. 

Mrs. Wymond ’s violin numbers 
were most exquisite, her Traumerie, 
especially, finding its way into the 
hearts of the hearers; and Mr. 
Philp, always a delightful perfor- 
mer, surpassed himself on this oc- 
casion. 

It was through the instrumen- 
tality of Mrs. A. F. Watkins, the 
wife of our president, that this 
recital was secured. The proceeds 
were used on the payments on the 
piano which Mrs. Watkins bought 
for the college sometime past. 

The following program was ren- 
dered : 

Songs for the Day: 

“The day breaketh in splendor 
and beauty.” 

Today Kroeger 

Morning Speaks 

Cherry Ripe (from Paul Pry) 

Horn 

The Four Leaf Clover Coombs 

Songs of Sentiment: 

Three Red Roses Norris 

Romance Tarnoffsky 

O, Happy Day! Goetz 

Violin Solo: 

(a) Polonaisa Allen 

(b) Traumerei Schumann 

Songs of Eastertide: 

Meditation Broekhoven 

My Redeemer and My Lord...B«cfe 
(From the “Golden Legend,” 
Scene V. Night. Elise 
Praying.) 

O, Rare as the Splendor of Lilies, 
Old Scotch Air. 

(Arrangement and Accompani- 
ment by Mrs. Smith.) 

Songs of Pathos: 

Dear, When I Gaze., Rogers 

Just A-Weary’in’ For You Bond 

The Rosary Nevin 

Forgotten Cowles 

Clarinet Solo: 

Polonaise .. Missup 

Songs of Humor: 

Obstination Fontenailles 

To My First Love Lohr 

You’d Better Ask Me Lohr 

Songs for the Eventide: 

“And night descendeth and a 
peaceful stillness pervades the 
earth. ’ ’ 

The Wanderer’s Night Song.Xiszf 



fcfre purple and mWt 



Prayer of the Night Von Fielitz 

The Hour of Dreaming. Hahn 

The Sea of Sleep Coombs 

Oh, That We Too Were Maying 

3 Nevin 

SHAKESPEARIAN PLAY. 

“As You Like It,” to Be Given by 

Students — Miss Smith and Jack 

Gaddis Assume Leading Role. 

Prof. Noble is hard at work now 
getting things ready to pull otf an 
innovation in the form of a Shakes- 
pearian play. 

The well known play, “As You 
Like It,” will be given under the 
same stage directions as it is play- 
ed by the Ben Greet players. The 
entire cast of characters has not 
been selected yet but Miss Smith 
will take the part of Rosalind and 
Jack Gaddis the part of Orlando. 

The play promises to be one of 
the biggest successes of the college 
year and its presentation is anx- 
iously awaited by the student body 
and friends in Jackson. 



PREP BASKET BALL TEAM 
ENTERTAINED. 



-The most delightful evening J 
spent by the boys on the Millsaps j 
prep basket ball team while on j 
their trip was, when they were en- 
tertained at the hospitable home 
of Mrs. J. T. Coney, of Hazlehurst. 
Here these young gentlemen were 
introduced to some of Hazlehurst ’s 
charming girls and were made J 
royally welcome. Nothing could 
have been more delightful than the J t 
hours spent in such a manner and | 
the lovely courtesy extended to* the 
team by Mrs. Coney and her j j 
daughters is one which will not [ j 
soon be forgotten. 

Although no schedule games 3 
have been played yet, the prep 3 
team puts up a great deal better i 
showing thah it did at the first of 
last season. With big Pear man 
on first and little Pearman behind 
the bat the team will be a great 
deal stronger than it was last year. 






m 



II -r.-V: 















(gHSGMS&m? 












You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



“Cram,” for the “specials” are 
coming soon. 



TT JACKSON'S BEST STORE, 

Kenn/ngtons 







Z. D. DAVIS, President. 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. 



AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 
W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK SPRING OPENING 



Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
* CITY DEPOSITORY. 

Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

undivided Profits, net 43.332.13 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Wavkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

L. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



DON’T BUY A READY-MADE SUIT FOR 



EASTER 



Come in and select your own cloth and 
have one made to your measure for 



$15.00 



NOW IS THE TIME! — Here are the smart styles in suits and top 
coats that you like. English models in two-button sack suits, smart 
Norfolks — the snappy things young men like. 

Our made-to-measure suits and top coats always give a man 
distinction and satisfaction. Call at once and inspect our complete 
line of Spring Suitings. It will be an easy matter to make your 
selection, and one that will please you. 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 

AN INSTITUTION OF MANY YEARS STANDING. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 



500 E. Capitol Street. 



Jackson, Mississippi. 



Good Teachers Wanted 



We have on hand right now a dozen good places for teachers 
with proper qualifications — responsible places on good salaries. Let 
us show you to them. 

FREE REGISTRATION TO MILLSAPS STUDENTS. 

Southwestern Teachers’ Agency 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



TATOM SHOES 



Their supremacy is due 
to a proper blending of 
correct style, good taste 
and absolute comfort. 

Tatom Shoe Company 

MISSISSIPPI’S BIGGEST AND 
BEST SHOE STORE 

415 East Capitol Street 





£bc Purple ano SUijite 



LOCALS. 

Melvin Cain visited relatives at 
Adams, Miss., Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

“Jerry” Montgomery spent sev- 
eral days of last week in Memphis 
on business. 

Dr. Kern went to Tylertown 
Saturday to referee in a high 
school meet. 

R. Edward Steen of Pearl, Miss., 
was a pleasant visitor on the cam- 
pus last Friday. 

Jim Wilburn of Pickens, visited 
friends and frat mates on the cam- 
pus recently. 

Y. B. Hathorne spent several 
days of last week with home peo- 
ple, at Bassfield, U. S. A. 

— 

“Biz” Clark returned to school 
Monday, after a week’s stay with 
■home people at Hattiesburg. 

Hendricks (passing down walk) : 
“Good morning, gentlemen, and 
you too, Dr. Sullivan.” 

Several visitors from town were 
out to attend the Galloway socie- 



ty’s special program Friday night. 

Prof. “Ducky” Lin was absent 
from college two days of this week, 
attending to business in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

Rev. Wroten and Ray filled 
their appointments at Duck Hill 
and Grenada, respectively, last 
Sunday. 

Luke Neil, the principal of the 
Madison Station High School, vis- 
ited friends and frat mates on the 
campus last week. 

Quite a number of the students 
attended the concert given in the 
chapel Thursday evening. All re- 
ported a good program and an en- 
joyable time. 

Henry: “That was a great base- 
ball game yesterday. ’ ’ 

Miss Bertie G. Steen: “What 

did you sav it was last night?” 



It is lots of fun and 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 






COMMENCEMENT 

INVITATIONS 

Very pretty and at 
reasonable price 
Send for samples and 



TUCKER 

Printing House 

Jackson, Miss. 



SAY BOYS! 



Help us by giving your 
laundry to the 

JACKSON 

STEAM LAUNDRY 

and oblige yours 

S. L. CROCKETT 
R. J. SPINKS 



| EAT ACME BAKERY'S f 

| WRAPPED BREAD 

I f 

Made Clean, Baked Clean and Sold Clean. Wrapped in V 
Waxed Paper, absolutely germ proof and dust proof paper. *»' 

It Costs No More, 5c* f 



DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores In the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles, Rubber goods. Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone “109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

Only Place for Millsaps College Stationery, 
Penants, Pillows, Hats, 

Wirts Fountain Pens 

JOHN W. CHISOLM, Manager 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 

DIRECTORS — R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHERS 
The Quality of Our Goods is Right 



The Prices Will Please You 



WE SELL FOR CASH OR ON EASY PAYMENTS 
AT CASH PRICES 

SEE US FIRST 









7 



Che purple anO mbite 



The Authors Club was enter- 
tained by Miss Stella McGehee on 
last Wednesday evening and the 
meeting was as usual profitable 
and delightful. 

Dr. Watkins (in Logic) : “Mr. 
Weems, what is a phenomena?” 
Mr. Weems: “Well, sir, it is 

something strange like — a cow sit- 
ting on a thistle singing like a 
mocking bird.” 



blessedness, had become a bene- 
dict. Congratulations and best 
wishes, “Fish.” 

LAW NOTES. 

Owing to the inclemency of the 
weather Judge Whitfield was 
forced to postpone Sunday’s ser- 
mon to the class. He will give it, 
however, on next Sunday, if cir- 
cumstances permit. 



Well! Well! No one got sick, 
and we did have the Lyceum en- 
tertainment Wednesday evening. 
It was simply fine, and was enjoy- 
ed by all. 

Young Lady (walking down 
Capitol street with Frazier) : ' 
“Why, now, don’t those oranges 
smell good.” 

“Frazier (excitedly): “Yes. 

let ’s walk along a little closer to 
them, so you can smell them bet- j 
ter.” 

Wm. Myers Colmers, of last | 
year’s sophomore class, now one of | 
the prominent educators of the 
state, was on the campus Saturday 
and Sunday. “Bill” is the same 
good fellow as of old, and his many 
friends were delighted to see him. 

“Kiddus I.” Cain left Wednes- 
day for home where he will spend 
a couple of weeks taking a rest be- 
fore returning to school to take up 
his many duties. 

The Commercial Appeal of re- 
cent date contained the interesting 
news that “Fish” Rodgers of last 
year’s soph, class, tired of single 



The great and only Jas. Marion 
'• Morse, Jr., lawyer et-cetera, was 
transacting legal business in Jack- 
son the first days of the week. 
Morse is located at Gulfport and 



Mr. C. E. Johnson, of Union, 
Miss., was in the city of legal bus- 
iness Tuesday. Mr. Johnson is a 
graduate of both law and literary 
departments of our college and it 
is gratifying to his old college 
friends to know that he is rapidly 
forging ahead. 

Much to the regret of his many 
friends and classmates, Mr. Grady 
Butler has withdrawn from school. 
The- unfortunate killing of his 
wife’s father last week necessitates 
his going to take charge of the bus- 
iness. It is not Butler’s purpose 
to give up law, so we shall hear 
from him again. 

As to the Moot Court, we are 
having very excellent meeting un- 
der the guidance of Mr. G. Ed- 
ward Williams, a prominent Jack- 
son lawyer. Mr. Williams has cer- 
tainly been generous to the class 



“GO!!” 

THAT’S THE SPIRIT OF BASE BALL 
and we keep Base Ball Goods, the kind that “go,” too — the 

I). & M. BASEBALL GOODS 
They are the best made and last longest — and cost less. Catalogs, 
Score Cards and Rule Books Free — ask about them. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



University of Virginia 

UNIVERSITY, VA. 

EDWIN A. ALDERMAN, LL. D., President. 

Departments Represented: 

THE COLLEGE, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

Loan funds available. All other expenses reduced to a minimum. 
Send for catalogue. 

HOWARD WINSTON, Registrar. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

Star Steam Laundry 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING. 
MISSISSIPPI’S LARGEST LAUNDRY. 
Phones 415. GALLOWAY, Agent. 

The Only White Spot in Jackson 

ROYAL CAFE 

Special Dining Room for Ladies and 
Gentlemen. 



FRANK GLICK, Mgr. 





F 


■OR - THE - YOUNG - 


MAN 



“KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES” 

We have on display the latest styles in Men’s Clothing, rep- 
resenting the highest standard of wormanship and tailoring. 
We guarantee a perfect fit and the quality will please you. 
Finest line of Gents’ Furnishing Goods in the City. 
COME TO SEE US. 



DOWNING-LOCKE COMPANY 

100 E. Capitol Street. Phone 720. 



J. D. GORDON, President. L. M. GORDON, Manager. 

Cumberland Phone 66. Home Phone 366. 

J. D. GORDON & SON 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Wholesale and Retail 

COAL AND WOOD 

HERRIN EGG AND RED ASH COAL 
A SPECIALTY. 



JOHN MOSAL, Prest. E. W. STRAUSS, Secy-Treas. 

ELECTRIC SUPPLY & PLUMBING CO. 

Everything usually sold hy supply houses in our line and a great 
many things carried only by the most progressive people. Novelties 
of all kind. Your trade solicited. 

119 SOUTH PRESIDENT ST. 

ELKS BUILDING. JACKSON, MISS. 




8 



Che purple anD Wlbitt 




BOXES AT 

tOc, 20c, 25c, 40c, 50c, 80c and $1.00 

CORNER DRUG STORE 

Capitol and Farish Sts. 



in that he gives his time and the 
j use of his office to us and we ought 
to show our appreciation by hav- 
ing a full attendance. Then, too, 
it is worth while to the student. 



FOR 

Something difler- 
ferent in Gent’s 
Furnishings, Hats, 

Gaps an d High 

Glass Tailoring 
See 

The Toggery 

Royal Hotel Building. 
Always Something New. 




A NEW 



ARROW 

COLLAR 

2 for 25c Cluett. Peabody & Co., Makers 

ROBB & CONANT 
Photographers 

"Work of any description un- 
dertaken, and best results guar- 
anteed. 

Photographs for catalogues or 
samples. Banquets, interiors and 
exteriors. Any time, any place. 

423*4 East Capitol St. 
Jackson, Miss. 




A man driving along a street in 
| a North Carolina town was struck 
by a baseball, receiving injuries 
from which he died. On the trial 
of a suit for damages against the 
municipality it was proved that 
the village boys had played in the 
streets for two years without inter- 
ference. The supreme court affirm- 
ed a judgment of non-suit on the 
ground that the municipality was 
not responsible for the negligence 
of its officials, whether or not there 
was an ordinance preventing ball 
playing. 



ociEry 

pins & 

EMBLEMS 



The Supreme Court of Massa- 
chusetts had a case involving a 
dog, an ice wagon and an automo- 
bile. The auto and the ice wagon 
were passing on a public highway, 
bound in opposite directions, when 
the dog ran out barking at the 
auto. He went under a wheel and 
the auto skidded in front of the 
ice wagon. The ice wagon horse 
reared and came down on the auto, 
causing injuries for which the 
owner of the dog was sued. The 
trial judge held that the dog was 
the cause of the injury, and his 
ruling is sustained by the highest 
court. 



WE CARRY IN 
STOCK FULL 
LINE 

of Millsaps College emblem 
buttons, fobs, medals, etc. 
We do all kinds of Watch 
and Jewelry repairing at 
moderate prices. Give us a 
look. 

RICHARDSON JEWELRY CO, 

Second door east of Ken- 
nington’s big store 
Jackson. Miss. 



Some interesting points of law 
from here and there: 

The question of whether a juror 
should be disqualified who does not 
believe in future punishments or 
in the Bible lias been decided by 
the Supreme Court of Iowa in fa- 
vor of the juror. The trial judge 
in the case of the State vs. Jackson 
(refused to discharge the juror on 
(the ground that because of his re- 
| ligious beliefs he could not take 
an oath that would be “binding 
upon his conscience.” The court 
j holds that “under our law any 
person otherwise competent may 
take an oath and act as a juror, no 
matter what his religious belief, 
provided that the oath is in a form 
which persons wllo take it regard 
as binding upon their conscience.” 

The college baseball team de- 
feated the prep school team in a 
practice game Saturday. The 
score being 5 to 7. 

Green visited home folks last 
week. 



THE 

“WHO-MADE-THEM-FOR-YOU” 

KIND OF CLOTHES 



They excite the flattering comment of your 
friends — the homage men pay to style and fit. 
Alfred Benjamin Clothes — our clothes — have that 
look — the expensive tailor look — and they cost no 
more than ordinary clothes bought elsewhere. 

Particularly seasonable styles for Fall and 
Winter wear. 

Try on tomorrow. 

Manhattan Shirts. 

Jno. B. Stetson and Crofut-Knapp Hats. 

Johnston & Murphy and Heywood Shoes. 

Underwear, Ties and Hosiery. 

For men and young men who want to dress 
correct. 



NYE WILSON 

Opposite Edwards House. 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.00 

in all the new 
Fall Styles 



JACKSON’S GREATEST STORE 

S. J. JOHNSON 

COMPANY 



“Regal" Shoes 
the College Boys’ 
Friend 

$3.50 to $5 



We Clothe the Well Dressed College Gentlemen. 
If you are not acquainted with our 

“SCHLOSS BROS.” 
CLOTHES 

Come in and let us show you the line, they are the 
Standard of Perfection. 



Edwin Clapp 
Shoes, they lead 
the world 
$6 and $6.50 



PRICE 



$15 to $25.00 



Manhattan Shirts 
known as the best 
Price 

$1-50, $1.75, $2 

TRY THEM 





QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. V. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1913. No. 21 



BASE BALL SEASON. 



Team Ready for Opening of Sea- 
son — Jackson League Today, 
Mississippi College Next Week. 



After exerting every effort and 
at the same time keeping his eagle 
eye wide open, Coach Harry 
Peaster has at last rounded into 
shape a winning team for Mill- 
saps. It is due to his untiring ef- 
forts to instruct and the willing- 
ness of the boys to learn that he 
was able to put out a good team, 
for he has imparted a vast amount 
of base ball knowledge to the 
boys. If the team does not hold 
together after his departure, the 
blame can not be placed on Peas- 
ter, because he certainly has told 
and showed the game to the boys 
in every detail. 

Such, however, will not be the 
case, for every man on the team 
realizes that he is a valuable as- 
set to the team and intends to 
give everything there is in him to- 
wards helping to make a winning 
team. 

Last week the team did not get 
to practice but three afternoons 
owing to the fact that it rained 
nearly every day, but this week 
the boys have had a hard workout 
every afternoon and it is remark- 
able to see how every man has im- 
proved. 

Next Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday three games are to be 
played with Mississippi College, 
which will mark the opening of 
the season. Both teams will just 
be out from under two good 
coaches and are expected to be in 
first class shape, which of course, 
means that hard fought battles 
will ensue. 

The diamond is being over- 
hauled and will be in fine condi- 1 
tion. The infield has been work- 
ed over and an inch and a half of 
sand has been added. 

(Continued on page 6.) 



WILL HAVE A GRAND ATHLETIC BALLY. PREPS WIN DEBATE. 



Monster Mass Meeting, Bubbling Over With Enthusiasm 
and Spirit, to be Held Night Before Mississippi 
College Plays Here — Orchestra Will Supply 
Music — Call for Every Millsapper to 
Be Present. 

The night of Wednesday, March the twenty -sixth, will be a big 
night at Millsaps College. Plans are under way whereby one of the 
biggest, grandest and most enthusiastic mass meetings ever pulled off 
at Millsaps will take place in the chapel that night. 

As everybody knows Mississippi College opens up here on the 
twenty-seventh for a three game series of baseball and as everybody 
knows Millsaps, without any ifs and ands about it, has got to win 
those three games, and every student of Millsaps College who has the 
least spark of college spirit and pride about him has got to help her 
do this. 

Everybody from the lowest class prep to the most solemn member 
of the law class must be present at the mass meeting. It is going to 
be a corker and no one can afford to miss it. 

Although the particulars of the meeting have not as yet been 
arranged it will very probably take the form of mass meetings held 
in the chapel in former years with the exception that it will be bigger 
and better than any other held before. 

The faculty will be on hand and a number of them will be called 
on to speak. The members of the ball team will also be given a chance 
to say a few words. Others will be there with a line of talk that will 
help to instil spirit into the team and the college in general. 

College songs and yells will take up a large part of the evening 
and best of all the college orchestra will be there to put life and 
spirit into the meeting with some good snappy music. 

The students are looking forward to the occasion with anticipa- 
tions of a most enjoyable and delightful evening, nor will they be 
disappointed as this meeting will be worthy to go down in history 
of Millsaps and remain in the memory of Millsaps students so long as 
they may live. 



BE IT RESOLVED, THAT MILLSAPS SHALL 

DEFEAT MISSISSIPPI COLLEGE THREE 

■ 

GAMES OF BASEBALL NEXT THURSDAY, 
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, AND THAT EVERY 
MILLSAPS STUDENT SHALL AID THE TEAM 
IN THE VICTORY BY THEIR ENTHUSIASM 
AND SUPPORT. 



Clegg and Golding Victorious 
Over F. C. A. 



The Millsaps preps pulled off 
one of the best debates heard in 
the college chapel this session, on 
Monday night, when they downed 
the debating team from French 
Camps. 

Both teams were well prepared 
for the event and went into it 
with all their might, but the 
preps had their adversaries best- 
ed at every stage of the game. 

I This was evidenced by the fact 
I that although French Camps got 
one vote for the debate, Millsaps 
got every vote for best speech 
and best speaker. 

The program was a most credi- 
table one and the debaters ac- 
quitted themselves in such a man- 
ner that they might easily have 
been taken for college debaters. 

Prof. Noble acted as president 
of the occasion, Willingham as 
secretary and Clark and Bufkin 
as time keepers. 

The question for debate was, 
“Resolved, That Mississippi 
should adopt the Initiative and 
Referendum.” French Camps up- 
held the affirmative while the 
preps were staunch defenders of 
the negative side. 

The first speaker on the affirm- 
ative was Pierson, who made a 
strong appeal for the Initiative 
and Referendum on the grounds 
that it would furnish a more dem- 
ocratic government. 

Next came Clegg on the nega- 
tive. and before he had gone very 
far it was quite evident that he 
was not only a speaker of excep- 
tional ability, but that he had a 
speech that was chuck full of 
clear, lucid arguments outlined 
and summarized in a perfect man- 
ner. 

That Clegg made a fine impres- 
sion was clearly shown by the 
fact that two of the judges award- 







2 



€be purple ano mbitt 



College Directory 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 



Dr. A. P. Watkins President j 

Dr. E. Y. Burton. Secretary } 

Dr. A. A. Kern. Librarian | 

Dr. J. M. Sullivan Vice President 

Dr. M. W. Swartz Treasurer 

FRATERNITIES. 

Kappa Alpha. 

Jack T. Gaddis Secretary 

Kappa Sigma. 

N. F. Harmon Secretary 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Frank T. Scott Secretary 

Sigma Upsilon. 

A. A. Kern Secretary 

Gamma Delta Epsilon. 

S. B. Lampton Secretary 

Kappa Mu. 

Miss Mary Shurlds... Secretary 

Phi Zeta. 

Miss Birdie Grey Steen Secretary 



Preparatory School. 

Prof. S. G. Noble Head Master 

Mrs. M. E. Joyce — Matron 

Y. M. C. A. 

D. J. Savage President 

F. T. Scott Vice President 

R. E. Selby Secretary 

W. S. Burns Treasurer 

Athletic Association. 

F. T. Scott President 

S. L. Crockett Vice President 

E. Y. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

H. H. Boswell Baseball Manager 

Jack T. Gaddis Football Manager 

J. B. Kirkland Basketball Manager 

N. F. Harmon Track Manager 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Lamar. 



F. T. Scott. 



.President 



Olin Ray 

R. I. Jolly 

Commencement Debaters 

R. E. Selby 

J. B. Kirkland 

Triangular Debaters 

Galloway Speakers. 

J. D. Wroten Anniversarian 

S. L. Crockett....:...Anniversary Orator 
W. E. Morse. Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
R. H. Harmon 

K. M. Broom 

Mid-Session Debaters 

W. W. Moore 

R. C. Edwards 

Commencement Debaters 

N. B. Harmon 

S. H. Frazier 

Triangular Debaters 

Tennis Club. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. M. Burton Secretary-Treasurer 

Prep Athletic Association. 

J. R. Spinks President 

A. B. Holder .Vice President 

S. G. Noble Secretary-Treasurer 

A. B. Holder Baseball Manager 

L. H. Gates Football Manager 

P. E. Whitson Track Manager 

W. M. Willingham Basketball Mgr. 

SCIENCE CLUB. 

H. H. Lester President 

S. B. Lampton Vice President 

H. F. Magee Secretary 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Purple and White. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager j 

Bobashela. 

F. T. Scott Editor-in-Chief 

J. T. Weems (Chairman) 

I. F L Magee n ..::::: Business Managers 

HONOR COUNCIL. 

J. T. Weems Chairman 

S. L. Crockett Clerk 



C. H. Clewett Vice-president 

Lusk Secretary 

Galloway. 

S. B. Lampton President 

W. O. Brumfield Vice-President 

J. B. Cain Secretary 

Clarence Bullock Treasurer 

Prentiss. 

N. Golding President 

C. W. Alford Vice President 

L. B. Bufkin Secretary 

L. H. Gates Treasurer 

CLASSES. 

Senior. 

S. B. Lampton President 

J. C. Honeycutt Vice President 

F. H. McGee - Secretary 

W. M. Cain Treasurer 

Junior. 

D. J. Savage President 

T. M. Cooper Vice President 

I. W. Howe Secretary 

H. L. Lassiter Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE. 

R. H. Harmon President 

K. M. Broom Vice President 

C. Bullock Secretary 

G. W. Harrison ......Treasurer 

FRESHMAN. 

T. L. Carraway Presidnt 

J. N. McNeil Vice President 

Miss Fannie Buck Secretary 

Law. 

T. L. Bailey President 

J. A. Blount Vice President 

— . — . Dabney Secretary 

F. Thompson Treasurer 

MILLSAPS REPRESENTATIVES. 
Millsaps-Hendrix Debaters. 

J. T. Weems W. E. Morse 

Triangular Debaters. 
Millsaps-A. & M. Debaters 
R. E. Selby. 

Millsaps-Mississippi College Debaters. 
J. B. Kirkland. 

Lamar Speakers. 

H. H. Boswell Anniversarian 

F. T. Scott Anniversary Orator 

J. T. Weems..Millsaps-Hendrix Debater 
C. A. Williams, Jr. 

J. M. Talbot 

Mid-Session Debaters 

C. H. Blewett Mid-Session Orator 



ed him best speech and voted for 
! him as best speaker of the even- 
ing. 

Bennett then came forward for 
the affirmative and delivered an 
excellent speech which was great- 
ly enjoyed by the audience. 

Golding, the last speaker on the , 
negative also proved to be a gun 
of a big calibre, for he bombarded 
the arguments of the opposing 
speakers and added many points 
to aid in a victory for the negative. ! 

The rejoinders were short and 
spirited, both sides contesting ; 
every point for all that it was 
worth. 

AVhen it was announced that ! 
the negative had won pandemo- j 
nium broke loose and the preps J 
and their college friends literally 
woke the dead in their effort to 
show their pleasure, while the vie- ( 
torious debaters were swept off j 
their feet by their enthusiastic J 
friends in their efforts to shower 
congratulations on them. 

As Prof. Noble predicted at the 
beginning of the contest, the 
French Camps boys proved them- 
selves formidable rivals and the 
preps deserve unstinted praise in 
defeating them. 

The French Camps boys, both 
on and off the stage, made a very 
favorable impression by their 
courteous manner and we. hope 



college chapel when Chas. W. 
Newcomb gave a delightful en- 
tertainment entitled, “A Unique 
University,” or ‘‘A College 
Course in Ninety Minutes.” The 
entertainment was one of the 
most laughable and enjoyable 
seen here in a long time and was 
roundly applauded by the large 
audience present. 



SOPH EDICT AT UNION: 

‘‘FRESHMEN, BEWARE.” 



The sophomores at Union Uni- 
versity, in addition to claiming 
everything contestable in that 
university and defying the other 
classes to dispute their claim, 
have issued the following ‘‘black 
hand” notice for the ‘‘verdant” 
freshmen : 

‘‘Beware that you let the foli- 
age of your craniums grow too 
luxuriantly; the sacred shears are 
still at their shrine. After due 
Professor Trip’s large audience deliberation we have decided a 
was due partly to the great hit he elipped head gives a freshman 
made last year in Twelfth jjj s p r0 p er a j r 0 f humility, so at 
Night,” before the Shakespeare- first rustle of spring - s garments, 
an Club of Jackson. Very few get to your denSj verdant ones.” 
who heard him last year faded to The p urple and white adds; 
hear him this time. Millsaps was “Freshmen, beware the first of 
interested in him because he is the ^ prd ” 

former teacher of Mrs. Swartz. 

u ho has delighted many of us xhe C0Ulds 0 f Mississippi had 
" ith her own readings. the ease 0 f a judge who told . a 

The performance was all that p e tit jury when it was impaneled 
was expected. In the opinion of that he intended to make the term 
the writer, Professor Trip was 0 f e0U x-t a business term and also 
better in Dickens than in Shakes- intended to make the court self- 
peare. He was wonderful in mak- sustaining. The case of Butler vs. 
ing the different characters dis- state W as appealed because of er- 
tinctive. His ability in th^s ea- ror by the court in lecturing the 
pacitv was amply demonstrated jury, on the ground that he ad- 
in his distinctive presentation of vised the jury to convict those 
the noble character of Tom Pinch charged with crime in order to 
and the humorous character of raise revenue for the county. The 
Miss Cherry Pecksniff. supreme court holds that although 

Last Lyceum Entertainment. . the judge exceeded his powers, his 
The last number of the Lyceum 1 statements did not justify a rever- 
Course took place last night in the ;sal of the judgment. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 

Millsaps College offers Courses leading to two 
Collegiate degrees, B. A. and B. S. 

A well equipped Law School offers courses 
leading to the Professional Degree of B. L. 

Ample provision is also made for those who 
are not candidates for any degree. 

For Catalogue or further information, address 

A. F. WATKINS, President 



they will come to Millsaps again. 

J Clegg and Golding have demon- 
strated that they have exception- 
al talents and much is expected 
of them when they come up in j 
j college. 

The result of the debate at C. 
H. A. could not be had at the time 
of going to press, but will appear 
in next issue. 



LYCEUM EVENT QUITE A 
SUCCESS. 



Mr. Trip’s Performance Highly 
Entertaining. 

On Wednesday night of the 
twelfth the fourth Lyceum at- 
traction was given before an ex- 
ceptionally large audience con- 
sidering the inclemency of the 
weather. The attraction was a 
reading by Professor Walter Trip 
of Dieken’s popular novel. “Mar- 
tin Chuzzlewit.” 




€&e purple anD TOite 



3 



DR. EDMONDS LECTURES PRENTISS LITERARY 

AT THE Y. M. C. A. SOCIETY. 



Splendid Address to Large and 
Appreciative Audience. 



On last Friday evening we had 
as speaker at the Y. M. C. A. one 
of the foremost preachers of our 
city, Reverend Dr. Edmonds, pas- 
tor of the First Christian Church, 
of Jackson. 

Dr. Edmonds had selected as 
his subject, “The Necessity of a 
School Preparation.” lie opened 
liis Bible at the twenty-fifth 
chapter of Mathew, and read as 
a lesson the parable of the Ten 
Virgins, five of whom were wise 
and five of whom were foolish. He 
read to us how the five foolish 
virgins who had no oil in their 
lamps were not admitted to the 
feast of their Lord, and likened 
race of life with hands unskilled 
them unto the man who enters the 
and mind untrained. Such an 
one, like the foolish virgins, is de- 
feated e’er he begins. 

Here we note that it isn’t al- 
ways the everyday events but. 
rather, the unusual emergencies 
of life that test the strength and 
character of men. Many of us 
master the easy lessons and grap- 
ple with the weak disadvantages, 
but melt down before the more 
difficult problems of life. Oh 
let it not be so ! But. rather, let 
us do both the easy and difficult 
task for the loudest call today is 
for men and women who can con- 
quer the strongest evils and 

mould the disadvantages into op- 

portunities. Here the speaker 
emphasized the fact that the fool- 
ish virgins were denied entrance 
at the feast because they came 
too late. Why did they come t-oo 
late? They came too late be- 
cause, having wasted their time 

of opportunity, they were unpre- 
pared. Just so in life. Not lack 
of opportunity, but lack of pre- 
paration explains our failures. 
Then, let us not be as the foolish 
virgins, but, rather let us, by 
grasping every opportunity that 
comes to us. prepare ourselves to 
meet all the demands of the day. 

In the end it was made clear to 
every one present that he who 
would live a life worth while 
must be thoroughly prepared with 
that knowledge and strength that 
will conquer disadvantages, for 
such comes to everyone. 



Splendid Meeting Held Friday 
Night — Preliminary to Tri- 
angular Debate. 



The Prentiss Literary Society 
held one of the most enthusiastic 
meetings Friday night that has 
ever been held in the college 
chapel. The two teams that de- 
bated against French Camps 
Academy and C. H. A. Monday 
night held a preliminary debate 
between themselves on Friday 
night. 

The college orchestra was pres- 
ent and furnished delightful mu- 
sic for the occasion. In addition 
to the numbers originally sched- 
uled many enchores were render- 
ed by the obliging orchestra. 

To add further enjoyment to 
the ocasion the preps had bowls 
of the finest and most delicious 
fruit punch which was served to 
the visitors. 

The program was an unusually 
strong one and everybody on it 
proved beyond the shadow of a 
doubt that they were well pre- 
pared for the event. 

Miss Elizabeth Watkins de- 
lighted the audience with an in- 
teresting reading delivered in a 
most charming and gracious 
style. 

C. W. Alford, as orator of the 
occasion, then came forward and 
delivered an excellent oration 
that was a treat to the many visi- 
tors. 

The debate exceeded the expec- 
tations of the piost sanguine well- 
wishers of the preps. Not only 
were the men on the debate all 
good speakers but they were right 
there with the goods when it 
came to producing arguments. 
The question was: “Resolved, 

That the Initiative and Referen- 
dum should be adopted in Missis- 
sippi.” 

Williams and Wooten were on 
the affirmative, while Clegg and 
Golding were on the negative. 
The question was decided in favor 
of the negative. 



We are very glad to have V. 
II. Sessions, who it will be remem- 
bered has been confined to his 
room with smallpox for several 
weeks, back at school. 



“Skeate” Williamson was in 
the city recently. 

« 



DIRECTORY 


DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
Second Floor Kress Building 
Phone 316 


We Keep Busy by Printing to Please. 

HEDERMAN BROS. 

JOB PRINTING 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Estimates on any kind of Printing 
Furnished Promptly. 

Mail Orders Solicited and Given 
Special Attention. 

PRICES JUST RIGHT. 


DR. W. R. WRIGHT 

DENTIST 

207-8-9 Century Building 
Cumberland Phone 325 
Jackson, Miss. 


WATKINS & WATKINS 
Attorneys at Law 

Watkins & Easterling Building. 

Jackson, Miss. 


T. H. COTTEN 

DENTIST 

214i/ 2 W. Capitol Street 
Office Phone 482 
Residence Phone 1705. 


The American Shoe Shining 
PARLORS 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 
Shine 5 Cents. 6 Shines 25 Cents. 

Tan Shoes Dyed Black 25 Cents. 
LIBERIS BROS., Proprietors. 

202 W. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


Ingrowing Nails Destroyed 

HALL’S REMEDY 
Does the trick 

Mailed for Half Dollar. 


ALLEN & JEFFERSON 
Barbers 

In New Huber Building 
Hair Cut 25c 


! 

DR. E. A. MAY 

DENTIST 

408-411 Century Building 
Phone 2007. JACKSON, MISS. 


Jackson Mercantile Co. 

Cigars, Cold Drinks and Stationery. 
One Block from Campus. 

Phone 1117. 

JACKSON, MISS. 


DR. W. L. BRITT 
Office Practice 

21014 West Capitol St. 
JACKSON, - - MISSISSIPPI. 


DR. F. P. WALKER 
Dentist 

Phone 670. Croom Building. 

East Capitol Street. 
JACKSON, - - - MISSISSIPPI. 


The Jones Printing Company 

DOES A 

GENERAL PRINTING BUSINESS 

109 North State St. JACKSON, MISS. 


LOGAN PHILIPS 

Clothier, Hatter, and Gents’ Furnisher 
— Sole Agent For — 

DUNLAP HATS, BOYDEN’S SMART 
SHOES FOR MEN, AND MAN- 
HATTAN SHIRTS. 

Your Patronage Solicited. 

108 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss. 


OPTOMETRY 

The science of adopting and applying 
Lenses to the Human Eyes for im- 
provement of vision and relief of eye- 
strain. 

E. R. v. SEUTTER 

-Dr of Optics — Dr. of Opthalmology. 


V. OTIS ROBERTSON, Jack*on, Miss. 

THOS. S. BRATTON, Jackson, Miss. 

S. V. ROBERTSON, Hattiesburg, Miss- 

Robertson & Robertson 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 



Century Building, Down Stairs Jackson Office Hattiesburg Office 
Jackson, Miss. 301-303 Century Bid. 206-208 Carter Bid. 



MAGEE - HAWKINS 


" 1 

COMPANY 


Gents Furnishings, Merchant Tailoring 


West Jackson 


Mississippi 



BON-TON CAFE 
REGULAR DINNER 35 CENTS 
Lunch Room, Cigars, Confectionery 
DINING ROOM FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Four Doors East of Edwards. Telephone 291 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

213 West Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 





4 



€fre purple and SQjrite 



Cljc Purple and CObtte 

Published weekly by the Athletic 
Association of Miilsaps College. 
Founded by the Junior Class in 1909. 

H. H. Boswell Editor-in-Chief 

F. T. Scott. Associate Editor 

Miss Stella McGehee Social Editor 

N. L. Cassibry .Athletic Editor 

G. H. Moore Special Reporter 

S. L. Crockett Local Editor 

T. L. Bailey Law Editor 

J. B. Cain Y. M. C. A. Editor 

A. B. Holder — Prep. School Editor 

J. B. Kirkland Business Manager 

L. H. Gates 

S. B. Lampton Asst. Bus. Managers 
W. W. Moore 

Matter intended for publication 
should he addressed to the Editor-in- 
Chief, and must be in his hands be- 
fore 3:00 o’clock on Saturday. 



them in body and spirit as they 
go into battle. 

Lets choose a leader for our 
yells and then lets every loyal 
Miilsaps man not only attend the 
mass meeting, but gather at every 
game and with our cheers and en- 
couragements, assure our team 
that we are with them and that 
we expect them to win. 

ANOTHER PHASE OF COL- 
LEGE LOYALTY. 



All business communications should 
be sent to J. B. Kirkland, Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second class matter, 
Jan. 2, 1909, at the postoffice at Jack- 
son, Miss., under act of Congress, 
March 3, 1879. 

One year’s subscription $1.50 

Each additional subscription 1.00 

Extra copies to subscribers 05 

Extra copies to non-subscribers 10 



THE MASS MEETING. 



We have not had a genuine en- 
thusiastic heart to heart, soul in- 
spiring, patriotic mass meeting 
this year, and the announcement 
that such an one is to take place 
within the near future is an omen 
of good things to come. 

A mass meeting — the kind 
where the students enter into the 
spirit of the occasion and fairly 
bubble over with enthusiasm and 
college spirit — do more to bind a 
man’s affections to his school 
than most any other one thing. 

In the first place, they create in 
a man a love for his alma mater 
that he fails to get elsewhere. 
They create in him a spirit and 
enthusiasm over his college’s wel- 
fare that bubbles up on every oc- 
casion where an exhibition of gen- 
uine college spirit is needed. They 
make him want to support the in- 
stitutions of the college. They 
create in him a college spirit, not 
the kind that finds its expression 
in mere noise and hurrah, but the 
kind that makes him desire to see 
his college excel and that makes 
him desire to have a part in the 
work that brings his college to 
the front. 

We believe that such a meeting 
will mean much to our team, just 
now beginning another season of 
hard games. They need our sup- 
port; not only do they need our 
financial aid, but they need also to 
hear our college songs and yells 
and to know that we are with 



Elsewhere in this issue will be 
I found a complete list of the ad- 
vertisers in this year’s “Boba- 
shela.” It is up to every man in 
college to patronize these firms. 
(Without the aid of these adver- 
( tisers it would be impossible for 
us to get out either of our publi- 
cations. You will find, too, that 

■ these men are interested in us. 
They are the men who put up the 
prizes for the track meet con- 
tests. They are the men who give 
work to Miilsaps boys and aid 
| them in every way they can. 

We don’t know why it is, but 
the fact remains that we are not 
able to get as many ads as other 
institutions. Take Mississippi 
College, for example. They al- 
ways have about twice as many 
ads in their annual as we have. 
This seems paradoxical when the 
fact of the location of the former 
institution is considered. There 
is a reason for it and we believe 
have discovered it. In talk- 
to several different business 
men in Jackson who advertise 
with Mississippi College and wh« 
do not advertise with us. the 
writer has been told that the rea- 
I son for it is that the boys from 
Clinton patronize their advertis- 
] ers and the Miilsaps boys do not. 

We know that it is a fact that 
i those fellows pay more attention 
I to this proposition than we do. 
They not only post their advertis- 
ers but they announce their 
names in chapel, and when they 
come to the city, they call on the 
men who help them out with their 
i publications. 

We should never fail to buy our 
goods from our advertisers and 

■ should always take care to let 
them know where we are from. 

SEASON TICKETS. 



! Owing to the small number of sea- 
|son tickets sold last year and the 
consequent loss thereof, it was 
thought best not to offer season 
' tickets this year. However, in re- 
sponse to a number of appeals 
from the student body the man- 
agement has decided to offer the 
tickets. 

Now this means just this: The 
students will be offered the op- 
portunity of buying tickets to the 
1 ball games at less than the one- 
half the customary price and if 
we cannot sell a ticket to practi- 
cally every student of the college 
it will be a losing proposition to 
offer the tickets. The tickets are 
offered for the good of the stu- 
dent body and the management 
expects the students to take ad- 
vantage of the opportunity to get 
tickets at half price and buy 
enough to justify the sale of 
same. If they don’t do this, as 
we have said before, it will prove 
a losing proposition and the as- 
sociation will end up the season 
in debt. 

Let us appeal to every Miilsaps 
student to show their college 
spirit and pride and at the same 
time benefit themselves by taking 
advantage of this opportunity 
and aiding the association. 



LAMARS POSTPONE 

SPECIAL MEETING. 



In order that the preps might 
[ have a clear field for their debate 
last Friday night, the Lamars, 
realizing that the preliminaiy 
contest would be of inestimable 
value in aiding the preps to win 
over their competitors, very cour- 
teously postponed their special 
meeting. 



BASE BALL. 



Miilsaps Again Defeats High 
School in Practice Game. 



The ball team engaged in a lit- 
tle practice game Monday after- 
noon with the Jackson High 
School. The most notable feature 
of the game was the listless way 
in which the Collegians played. 
Only once did the High School 
have a chance of winning and 
that was in the fourth inning 
when the score was 3-2 in their 
favor. In the first of the fifth, 
however, the Collegians seeing 
that runs were needed got the 
proper “pep” into their playing 
and with a bunch of hits includ- 
ing a three bagger by Condrey, 



we 

mg 



“GO!!” 

THAT’S THE SPIRIT OF BASE BALL 
and we keep Base Ball Goods, the kind that “go,” too — the 
D. & M. BASEBALL GOODS 

They are the best made and last longest — and cost less. Catalogs, 
Score Cards and Rule Books Free — ask about them. 

FRANSIOLI’S ROOKERY— The Place— Of Course 



If you want a chance to show 
your college spirit you can not 
do so better than by buying a 
season ticket to the ball games. 



Big F 


resh Stock of 




HUDNUT’S 
COLGATE’S and 
ANDREW JERGEN’S 
PERFUMES AND TOILET PRE- 
PARATIONS HAVE JUST BEEN 
RECEIVED BY 


- 

The Eclipse Drug Company 

Next Door to Fransioli’s Rookery. 

232 E. Capitol Street. 

QUICK DELIVERY SERVICE.' 
Cumberland Phone 2190. Home Phone 538. 




Cbe purple anD mWt 



5 



they ran up four score in about 
as many minutes. 

The High School boys were 
game to the last and fought hard i 
all through the game. 

“Big Foot” Jones captured the j 
batting honors, getting four hits , 
out of five times up. 

C'offy and Brady got two base 
hits for the High School team. 

Score. 



Millsaps — 


AB 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


Jackson, rf 


.... 5 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Brown, ss 


.... 4 


1 


1 


0 


3 


2 


Condrey, 3b 


.... 5 


2 


2 


2 


1 


0 


Jones, If 


.... 5 


1 


4 


0 


0 


0 


Cassibry, c 


.... 5 


1 


2 


11 


0 


0 


Holloman, 2b 


.... 4 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


Galloway, lb 


.... 4 


0 


1 


8 


0 


1 


Hathorne, cf 


.... 3 


0 


0 


1 


0 


ol 


Ward, p 


.... 3 


0 


0 


3 


0 


0 


Harris, p 


... 1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 1 


Total 


.39 


7 


12 


27 


5 


4 


High School — 


AB. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


Ball, c 


. 4 


1 


1 


10 


0 


0 


Herring, cf 


... 3 


0 


0 


1 


0 


0 


Smith, ss 


9 

... o 


0 


0 


1 


0 


1 


Taylor, p 


... 4 


0 


0 


0 


3 


1 | 


Frisby, lb 


... 4 


0 


1 


8 


0 


3 


Jones, 2b-cf 


... 4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


0 


Coffey, 3b 


... 4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


0 


Brady, If 


... 4 


0 


1 


1 


0 


0 


Williams, rf 


... 3 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Hebron, 2b 


... 1 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


Williams, O., 3b. 


... 1 


0 


0 


1 


1 


1 



Total 35 3 5 24 9 6 j 

It 





You’ll find Walk-Over Shoes, Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx Clothes, and lots 
of other good things to wear at 



W JACKSON'S BEST STORE 

Kemngtons 



The following are advertisers 
in -the “Bobashela” for 191:1. We 
appeal to all loyal Millsaps stu- ;j 
dents to patronize them, for they ,| 
are the ones who are helping us 
support our publications.: 

S. J. Johnson Co. 

Hunter & Magee. 

The Daniel Studio. 

Capital National Bank. 

Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. [ 
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Citizens' Savings Bank and 
Trust Co. 



NOTICE. 



Electric Supply and Plumbing 
Company. 

The Toggery. 

W. F. West. Tailor. 

E. T. Chambers Typewriter Co. 
The First National Bank. 

J. W. Chisolm. Millsaps Book 
Depository. 

The Eclipse Drug Co. 

Dr. E. If. Galloway. 

T. B. Doxey. Tailor. 

Smith & Lamar, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Luderbach Plumbing Co. 



/ Z. D. DAVIS, President. AMOS R. JOHNSTON, Cashier 

R. W. MILLSAPS, Vice President. W. N. CHENEY, Teller. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

Jackson, Mississippi 

UNITED STATES, HINDS COUNTY AND 
CITY DEPOSITORY. 



Capital Paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ Liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus Earned 100,000.00 

/naivided Profits, net 43.332.13 



ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. 

OUR FIVE CARDINAL PRINCIPLES: Safety, Stability, Accuracy, 

Courtesy and Promptness. We will be glad to receive 
your business on this basis. 

DIRECTORS 

R. W. Millsaps, W. J. Davis, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, B. Watkins, 
C. A. Alexander, W. B. Jones, R. L. Saunders, S. J. Johnson, 

Li. B. Moseley, W. C. Ellis, A. A. Green, Logan Phillips 
W. D. Hannah, F. E. Gunter, E. Simpson. 

Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent, $3 Per Year and Up. 



Reliable Tailoring 



Attention, Gentlemen! A man is judged by his personal ap- 
pearance. Look classy and you'll be first served every time. Our 
$15 suits and top coats pay big dividends. They are built to stand 
wear and tear — not a one-season investment. They have that costly 
imported appearance; that snappy, elegant cut and finish that only 
comes with perfect art tailoring. 

SUIT TO ORDER $ J5 TOP COAT TO ORDER 

■ — — " ■ 

And don’t forget that our guarantee for style and quality of our 
tailoring is strictly correct and dependable. 

Drop in any time and look over our line. You are always welcome 
whether you buy or not. 

Remember, our tailors will not let you go until your garments 
carry the Standard's reputation for up-to-the-minute perfection. 

STANDARD WOOLEN CO. 



AN INSTITUTION OF MANY YEARS STANDING. 

LEO E. COHN, Manager. 

500 E. Capitol Street. Jackson, Mississippi. 




Good Teachers Wanted 

We have on hand right now a dozen" good places for teachers 
with proper qualifications — responsible places on good salaries. Let 
us show you to them. 

FREE REGISTRATION TO MILLSAPS STUDENTS. 

Southwestern Teachers’ Agency 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



T A T O M SHOES 

Their supremacy is due 
to a proper blending of 
correct style, good taste 
and absolute comfort. 



Tatom Shoe Company 

MISSISSIPPI’S BIGGEST AND 
BEST SHOE STORE 

415 East Capitol Street 













6 



Ci)c Purple anD Mtt 



Tatom Shoe Co. 

Jackson Steam Laundry. 

Paul Miller. 

Star Steam Laundry. 

Bellhaven Collegiate and In- 
dustrial Institute. 

II. K. Hardy. 

J. M. Black Grocery Co. 

Tom E. Taylor. 

Hall-Miller Decorating Co. 

Geo. B. Power. 

.John B. Ricketts. 

Bon Ton Cafe. 

Watkins and Watkins. 

Longino and Ricketts. 

Millsaps College. 

TRACK TEAM. 



The Merchants Association of 
Shreveport, La., are planning to 
have a grand track meet in that 
city on May 1, 2 and 3. All the 
colleges of Mississippi, Louisiana 
and Texas, have been invited to 
participate. Millsaps will doubt- 
less send a team to compete and 
bring back some of the trophies. 

The track team is doing excel- 
lent work under Coach Fletcher 
and Manager Harmon expects to 
make a good showing both at 
Shreveport and at Aberdeen. 

THE MILLSAPS ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION. 



for a banquet for the association 
during commencement. A com- 
mittee consisting of Prof. G. L. 
Harrell as chairman, Miss Hem- 
ingway, and Mr. W. F. Logue, was 
appointed to work this up. The 
exact date has not been set for the 
banquet but, as was said, it will 
be sometime during commence- 
ment. Every member of the As- 
sociation is expected to be present, 
consequently we may expect to see 
a great many old Millsaps men 
here at commencement time. Sev- 
eral matters of importance will 
come up before the Association at 
this time. 

Another important matter taken 
up at last Thursday’s meeting was 
the matter of buying a lens for the 
observatory. Mr. Robert Ricketts, 
president of the Association, and 
Prof. G. L. Harrell were placed on 
the committee to work this up. 
This should be a matter of interest 
to every Millsaps man, as a lens 
will give him a great deal of pleas- 
ure and benefit when he becomes 
a senior and studies astronomy. 
Prof. Harrell is behind this move- 
ment and, on this account, we feel 
sure that it will be successful. 
Prof. Harrell deserves a great deal 
of credit for the interest he is man- 
ifesting. 



Movement to Buy a Lens — Ban- 
quet at Commencement. 



Nothing but rain can keep our 
ball team from winning. 



The Millsaps Alumni Associa- 
tion held an important meeting 
last Thursday afternoon in the 
Board of Trade rooms. * The pur- 
pose of the meeting was to arrange 

It is lots of fun and | 
pleasure you are miss- 
ing in not having a 

KODAK 

Let Eyrich & Co. 

show you 



(Continued from page 1) 

The following men are the ones 
whom Coach Peaster has selected 
to win fame for their alma mater: 
Cassibry. catcher. 

Harris and Ward, pitchers. 
Galloway, first base. 

Murrah, second base. 
Hollowman, second base. 

Brown, short stop. 

C’ondrey, third base. 

Jones, left field. 

Hathorn,. center field. 

Baxtrom, center field. 

Jackson, right field. 

Gaddis, utility. 






EAT ACME BAKERY'S 
WRAPPED BREAD 



i 
* 
i 

t 

Made Clean, Baked Clean and Sold Clean. Wrapped in X 

r Y 

Waxed Paper, absolutely germ proof and dust proof paper. X 

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W 



U Costs No More, 5c. 






DRUGS! DRUGS!! DRUGS!!! 



The College boys desiring to visit a first class Drug Store will 
call at “The Old Reliable,” corner Capitol and State Streets, where 
they will find one of the best and most up-to-date Drug Stores in the 
South. Upon inquiring from any of the clerks, who are willing to 
be as accommodating as their ability will allow, will be pleased to 
show them our entire line such as the best and latest goods on Foun- 
tain Pens, Stationery, Brushes of all kinds; complete line of Toilet 
articles. Rubber goods, Pipes and the best assortment of Cigars, 
Cigarettes and Smoking Tobaccos in the city. 

We make a specialty of our Prescription work, only the best and 
purest of Drugs used by Graduates and Registered Druggists. 

If you can’t come, telephone "109” and our messenger boy will 
come on a bicycle. 

Hunter & McGee 

“The Old Reliable” • 

Corner of State and Capitol Streets. 



Also Mangum will take care of your orders for your Recep- 
tions. He makes it a business to serve Receptions just as they 
should be served, furnishing everything complete. 

His line of Whitman’s and Nunnally’s Candies are always 
fresh. These Candies are especially popular with the young 
ladies. 

When down town make our Store your headquarters, where 
you are always welcome. 

J. S. MANGUM, at Hunter & McGee 



MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

Only Place for Millsaps College Stationery, 
Tenants, Pillows, Hats, 

Wirts Fountain Pens 

JOHN W. CHISOLM, Manager 



Z. D. Davis, President. 

R. W. Millsaps, Vice-President. 



W. M. Buie, 2nd Vice-President. 

S. C. Hart, Cashier. 



CITIZENS SAVINGS BANK & TRUST CO. 

' CAPITAL, $50,000.00. SURPLUS, $5,000.00. 

4 Per Cent Paid on Deposits from $1.00 Up. Interest Compounded 

Semi-Annually. 



DIRECTORS- 



-R. W. Millsaps, S. J. Johnson, Z. D. Davis, Ben Hart, 
A. A. Green, W. M. Buie. 



Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHERS 
The Quality of Our Goods is Right 
The* Prices Will Please You 



WE SELL FOR CASH OR ON EASY PAYMENTS 
AT CASH PRICES 

SEE KB FIRST 







€Se Purple anD Witt 



7 



Y ou Smoke a “Better” T obacco^ 



Why Not Smoke The Best? 




WALLACE IRWIN 



Wallace Irwin, writer and lyricist, author 
of “ Letters of a Japanese Schoolboy.” 
etc., says : 

"Tuxedo is always welcome. A 
pleasant smoke , a mental bracer — 
the ideal tobacco 




JAMES W. LOYND 



James W. Loynd, superintendent of the 
Prudential Insurance Co. at Philadelphia, 
says: 

"I could not smoke a pipe until 
I smoked Tuxedo . I found it a cool 
— mild — even-burning tobacco of 
delightful flavor. As a solace and 
relief after a strenuous day , it is 
the 'Real Thing ' .” 




WM. COATES 



Wm. Coates, Chief Engineer of the Pitts- 
burgh Fire Department, says : 

‘ ‘ Tuxedo is mild, with no tongue- 
bite and no throat irritation . I like 
it as well as any tobacco that I have 
ever used." 



T HE tobacco you now smoke you consider 
“better tobacco than you ever smoked before.” 
Naturally, you kept trying untii you found a 
“better” one. 

But it stands to reason that since there is a 
difference in tobaccos you may be missing still 
greater pleasure in a still better smoke — in the 
BEST smoke, in fact. 

We know that Tuxedo is the best smoke because 
we know that no better tobacco leaf grows, and 
that no process of treating tobacco leaf equals the 
Tuxedo process. 

^Tuxedo 

\ The Perfect Tobacco for Pipe and Cigarette 

We know that Tuxedo is made of the BEST 
tobacco — rich, mellow, perfectly aged Kentucky 
Burley. None better can be bought , because none 
better is grown. 

Tuxedo is pure tobacco , through and through 
— handled under the cleanliest conditions. 

It is treated by the famous original “Tuxedo 
process” for removing the sting and bite of the 
natural vegetable oils. 

Tuxedo was born in 1904. Its first imitator 
appeared two years later. Since then a host of 
imitations have sprung up. 

No other tobacco can give the unique pleasure 
of Tuxedo because no other maker has yet been 
able to equal the Tuxedo quality! 

Only by smoking the original can you get 
complete satisfaction in pipe or cigarette. 

YOU CAN BUY TUXEDO EVERYWHERE 

Famous green tin, with gold “I A Convenient pouch, inner- C 
lettering, curved to fit pocket 1UC /inec/with moisture-proof paper DC 





HENRY HUTT 



Henry Hutt. whose “American Girl” cre- 
ations have made him famous, says: 



“ A pipeful of Tuxedo puts new 
life into me. The mildest and 
purest tobacco grown." 



/th^r 




GEORGE E. PHILIPPS 



George E. Philipps, Mayor of Covington, 
Kentucky, says: 

“ A good pipe, and Tuxedo to 
fill it, and I'm satisfied. The to- 
bacco in the little green tin has no 
rival as far as I am concerned . ” 







W. HAYDEN COLLINS 

W. Hayden Collins, prominent in real 
estate and member of the Chamber of 
Commerce of Washington, D. C-, says: 

“ I've compared Tuxedo with 
other tobaccos, much to the advan- 
tage of Tuxedo. It leads by a wide 
margin in purity and mildness .” 






u 



8 



€be purple anD &3ftite 



LOCALS. 



Special examinations have been 
“the order of the day’’ this week. 

* * # # 

We are glad to report that Mrs. 
R. S. Ricketts, who has been ill for 

several days, is rapidly improving. 

* * * * 

Someone wants to know just 
what Prof. E. G. Burton said when 
he heard that the preps had de- 
feated the Varsity? 

* * * * 

Brother Lewis, the oldest living 
member of the Mississippi Confer- 
ence, conducted chapel exercises 
and made a highly interesting 
talk to the student body one day 
last week. 

* * # * 

Isn’t it time for the students to 
organize and elect cheer leaders 
for the Mississippi College games 
next week? Lets get up some en- 
thusiasm. We’ve got to get their 
baseball goat, too, you know. 

* * * • 

We regret to report that 
“Bish” Murrah has been confined ] 
to his bed for several days from | 
an attack of lagrippe. He is now j 
improving and. in all probability. , 
will soon be out on the baseball 
field again. 

* * * * 

We hear that Mrs. Hull, the 
popular wife of our former presi- 
dent is soon to be a visitor on the j 
campus. We can assure her of a 
glad welcome from every boy on 
the campus, especially those who 
knew her best during her two 
years stay among us. 

* * # * 

John Vettle, of the city, who { 
has for the past several years held 
a position in the U. S. land office j 
and who took the law course at 
Millsaps last year, is going to 
Chicago in June to pursue the 



SCHOOL 

COMMENCEMENT 

INVITATIONS 

Very pretty and at 
reasonable price 
Send for samples and 
prices 

TUCKER 

Printing House 

Jackson, Miss. 



study of law in the University of 
Chicago. 

4 * * * 

Gilbert Cook, a graduate of 
Millsaps and a brother of “Dr.” 
Holloman Cook, paid a visit to his 
brother last week. Cook is prin- 
cipal of the High School at Lake, 
Miss., where he is held in high es- 
teem. We are always glad to hear 
of Millsaps men making good. 

* # # # 

Judge Thomas L. Bailey has an- 
nounced his intention of settling 
in Meridian to practice law. Bailey 
is one of the leading members of 
the law class, is endowed with 
qualities of leadership and organi- 
zation and would be a great asset 
to any community in which he 
casts his lot. The Queen City may 
well be proud of his choice. 

* • * * 

A letter from Rocoe Berry 
brings the information that “Ros” 
is going to study law next year. 
He is at present principal of the 
Shelby Graded School at Shelly, 
Miss. Roscoe says the people up 
there hate to give him up but that 
he must follow the call to the bar. 
Here is hoping that he will be as 
successful in this as he has in his 
former undertakings. 

* * * # 

Hon. Samuel B. Lampton. the 
distinguished president of the 
senior class, made a business trip i 
to his home in Tylertown the lat - 1 
ter part of last week. Mr. Lamp- 1 
ton. on being interviewed by a re- 
porter of this paper, reported a 
successful trip. He says that the 
people in that section of the state 
are making rapid preparations for 
the coming-crop. The signs are 
hopeful. 

HIGH SCHOOL MEET WILL BE 
HELD ON APRIL 19. 



Prof. Burton has been actively 
agaged in getting out literature 
) the various high schools con- 
?rning the Mississippi Inter- 
•holastic Oratorical Contest and 
rack Meet to be held here on 
pril 19. 

Plans are being devised where- 
v this meet will be made bigger 
ad better than ever before. En- 
raraging reports have • been re- 
vived from a number of schools 
ad everything points to .the most 
iceessful meet in the history of 
le association. 

A full writeup and prospectus 
t the meet will appear in an early 



“Dunlap” Hats 

$ 5.0